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11 20th August 06:35
roger halstead
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Default High Altitude operations (Turbo charge???)


Ummmm..no, that;'s not what I said.
I said it requires a rather healthy mixture which helps with the
cooling (need created by the NOS)

Roger Halstead (K8RI EN73 & ARRL Life Member)
http://www.rogerhalstead.com
N833R World's oldest Debonair? (S# CD-2)
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12 20th August 06:35
roger halstead
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Default High Altitude operations (Turbo charge???)


I need to measure the pressure, but I'd guess the one I have with the
200 mph exhaust is about 15 inches or more.

However were it deadheaded, I don't know what it could do.

Roger Halstead (K8RI EN73 & ARRL Life Member)
http://www.rogerhalstead.com
N833R World's oldest Debonair? (S# CD-2)
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13 20th August 06:35
richard lamb
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Default High Altitude operations (Turbo charge???)


How about building a 2180.

Personally, I'd not fly a turbocharged VW.

Ever.

Richard

htp://www.flash.net/~lamb01
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14 21st August 03:52
ernest christley
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Default High Altitude operations (Turbo charge???)


First, how much you paid for it has absolutely nothing to do with how
much pressure it will produce.

Second, where are you finding $40 gas powered leaf blowers. I need one.

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15 21st August 03:52
rj cook
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Default High Altitude operations (Turbo charge???)


If your blower has an exhaust velocity of 200 MPH the maximum pressure
recovery in a diffuser would be about .7 pounds/in2, realistically about .5
lbs/in2.

RJ
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16 21st August 12:00
robertr237@aol.composit
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Default High Altitude operations (Turbo charge???)


In article <vgird8seuhjl61@corp.supernews.com>, "Morgans"
<jisumorgan@charterdotjunkdotnet> writes:


With all this talk of using a gas powered blower would someone please explain
how that blower is going to overcome the effects of altitude and maintain the
same velocity of air. It is going to drop off in power just as the engine will
and at altitude its effect will be nil.

Bob Reed
http://www.kisbuild.r-a-reed-assoc.com (KIS Builders Site)
KIS Cruiser in progress...Slow but steady progress....

"Ladies and Gentlemen, take my advice,
pull down your pants and Slide on the Ice!"
(M.A.S.H. Sidney Freedman)
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17 22nd August 02:45
ernest christley
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Default High Altitude operations (Turbo charge???)


Bob, they've told you already. They're going to put a turbo on the
blower. Sheesh! 8*)

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18 22nd August 02:45
bonomi@c-ns. (robert
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Default High Altitude operations (Turbo charge???)


30" of mercury is nominally 14.7 psi.

For rough approximations just use a factor of 2
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19 22nd August 02:45
morgans
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Default High Altitude operations (Turbo charge???)


"> With all this talk of using a gas powered blower would someone please
explain

the

will


"IF" you hook a leaf blower to pressurize the carb, and IF the carb was the
type that could deal with the pressure without building an airtight box
around it, and IF the CFM of the blower was high enough to be greater than
the CFM of the engine at WOT, and IF the blower had a carb that could adjust
to the altitude without going lean, and IF the blower still had a few inches
of mercury pressure left over after all of that, it would supply a sensation
of boost to the engine to raise the manifold pressure back up to what it was
at sea level while it was buzzing along at, say, 8,000 feet.

Yes, the blower wooould have lost some of its power compared to sea level,
but what I would propose is turbo normalizing, so the increased power is of
no use at sea level. Of course, it could be used to provide a boost for
take off and such.

Now, for all of the "IF"s !!! Not that many induction systems would
take the added pressure without modification. Then there is the regulating
valve for the turbonormalizing to deal with. I don't believe the CFM would
be enough to keep up with more than a small (40 -50 HP ?) engine. No one
has taken a pressure measurement from the home depot blower yet, so "I"
doubt that it could produce more than one or two inches of additional
pressure. (if that much)

More reasons why I doubt the validity of such a Rube Goldberg setup.

The superchargers that can do a good job of increasing manifold pressure use
more HP than a 31 cc motor could ever produce.

There is a reason the superchargers turn 80,000 RPM (some less, some more)
They have to, to produce enough boost pressure.

The superchargers also have very sophisticated impellers to deal with
airflow at these speed, and the home depot blower does not have any
sophistication.

Now I put out a disclaimer. This was not any of my idea, nor would I do
such a thing, but it is a semi-interesting mental exercise!

How's that? :-)
--
Jim in NC
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20 22nd August 02:45
rich s.
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Posts: 1
Default High Altitude operations (Turbo charge???)


<snip>

<resnip>

But Jim. . . If the engine is just returned to sea level conditions, where
is the pressure? At your given example of 8000', the manifold pressure would
still be less than atmospheric pressure, would it not?

Rich S.
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