Mombu the Chevrolet Forum sponsored links

Go Back   Mombu the Chevrolet Forum > Chevrolet > Help- what tool for 2000 silverado caliper? Torx? Allen?
User Name
Password
REGISTER NOW! Mark Forums Read

sponsored links


Reply
 
1 25th May 18:26
cwr43
External User
 
Posts: 1
Default Help- what tool for 2000 silverado caliper? Torx? Allen?


I need some help folks- I'm just trying to remove the old brake pads
in my 2000 silverado 4x2, and to do that I need to remove the caliper
mounting bolts, which appear to be a torx bolt, although an allen
wrench could also fit. The largest torx bit I can find at home depot
or lowes is a T50 bit, and it's too small. A 10 mm allen is too big,
and an 8mm feels too small, and like I said, the bolt looks like it's
supposed to be for a torx and not an allen. Anybody want to send me an
email and tell me the proper tool? Anyone know who sells extremely
large torx bits? Thank you.


On a side note (but I'll still take your advice ,
Regarding the 'caliper mounting bracket bolts' which are 17 mm I think
(and not the same as the 'caliper mounting bolts' torx problem I ask
about above) - anyway, they have never been removed, and today I tried
to remove them applying 170 ft-lbs of torque and the damn things
wouldn't budge. Anyone else have a problem with these being
overly-tightened from the factory and what did you do?


Please email me at cwr43@yahoo.com at your earliest covenience.
I want to finish out the job tomorrow morn. thanks-
Chris
  Reply With Quote


  sponsored links


2 25th May 18:26
shiden_kai
External User
 
Posts: 1
Default Help- what tool for 2000 silverado caliper? Torx? Allen?


I believe it is a 55 torx bit.

a side note (but I'll still take your advice ,

Never had a problem with them being "overly-tightened" from
the factory...but....I have found them to be extremely tight due
to the heavy duty lock-tite they use on those bolts from the
factory. It's just the way they are...I use a quality socket and
a 30 inch swing handle....they come off....

Ian
  Reply With Quote
3 25th May 18:26
mike levy
External User
 
Posts: 1
Default Help- what tool for 2000 silverado caliper? Torx? Allen?


I think GM may be somewhat standard across the board, my 94 Jimmy is a
3/8" hex or allen wrench. You can buy one that goes on a ratchet like
a socket does, only the business end has the allen wrench. Best bet,
go to a parts store, say you need the brake tool or wrench to take the
caliper off and tell them the truck. Any parts person worth his or
her weight should know exactly what one you need...
  Reply With Quote
4 25th May 22:47
cwr43
External User
 
Posts: 1
Default Help- what tool for 2000 silverado caliper? Torx? Allen?


Thanks to Shiden-kai and and Tom for responding. For all those wanting
to know, it was a torx T-55 bit for the caliper guide pin. Interesting
note is that I drive my truck hard and brake hard, but don't haul many
loads and at 50k my front pads were still at 70%. Rears were about
40%. Anybody else have input about front brake pad wear in a 2000 1/2
ton siverado? Wondering if I got lucky...
Chris
  Reply With Quote
5 25th May 22:47
shiden_kai
External User
 
Posts: 1
Default Help- what tool for 2000 silverado caliper? Torx? Allen?


No, this is normal for the new style trucks. I have yet to actually
replace front brake pads on these trucks for being "worn out".
I've seen trucks with 100,000 miles on them that still have over
50% pad left. What I'm finding is that the front pads usually
start to stick on the sliding surfaces of the caliper support and
then one or more of the pads no longer is in contact with the
rotor. Then the surface of the rotor begins to rust. So then
we end up performing a front brake job due to this
"seizing" problem, rather then actual front brake pad
wear.

Personally, if I owned one of these trucks, I would be
dis-assembling my front calipers and pads, cleaning up
the sliding surfaces (which are actually removable shims)
and lubricating all the moving points every couple of
years. I suspect that you would never have to replace
the pads over the life time of the truck if this was done.

Rears are another story. Usually, the right inner pad
is the first to go. We do rear brakes all the time on
the new trucks. Thank goodness, or brake jobs would
simply be non-existent on these new trucks. Wouldn't
want that, now, would we?

Ian
  Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools
Display Modes




Copyright 2006 SmartyDevil.com - Dies Mies Jeschet Boenedoesef Douvema Enitemaus -
666