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1 27th May 21:08
aaron nelson
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Posts: 1
Default Importing large .eps images


Often when I import an .eps image from Illustrator to Photoshop I get strange artifacts. Funny black shapes and the like. At first I thought it might be my computer's attempt at an inkblot test, but the novelty of the situation quickly wore off. I only get problems when I'm trying to import at a very high resolution, like 16" x 8" at 600 dpi. There are workarounds, and overall I'm able to live with this particular bug, but I was curious as to whether anyone else has experienced similar problems, and what, if anything, they were able to do to remedy the situation.
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2 27th May 21:09
aaron nelson
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Posts: 1
Default Importing large .eps images


Often when I import an .eps image from Illustrator to Photoshop I get strange artifacts. Funny black shapes and the like. At first I thought it might be my computer's attempt at an inkblot test, but the novelty of the situation quickly wore off. I only get problems when I'm trying to import at a very high resolution, like 16" x 8" at 600 dpi. There are workarounds, and overall I'm able to live with this particular bug, but I was curious as to whether anyone else has experienced similar problems, and what, if anything, they were able to do to remedy the situation.
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3 30th May 00:39
bludvlz
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Posts: 1
Default Importing large .eps images


How are you importing the image? From the clipboard or via the Open dialog?

Do the artifacts change depending on your magnification level? If so, it could be a video issue.

If the artifacts don't change, it could be a (bad) RAM issue.

A bit more of an explanation of your steps (and the workarounds you have) might shed a bit more light on the situation.
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4 30th May 00:40
bludvlz
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Posts: 1
Default Importing large .eps images


How are you importing the image? From the clipboard or via the Open dialog?

Do the artifacts change depending on your magnification level? If so, it could be a video issue.

If the artifacts don't change, it could be a (bad) RAM issue.

A bit more of an explanation of your steps (and the workarounds you have) might shed a bit more light on the situation.
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5 7th June 14:13
aaron_nelson
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Posts: 1
Default Importing large .eps images


Okay, the specifics are as follows:

I have had the opportunity to teach our engineer some basics of photoshop and illustrator. He can't seem to understand the concept of vector vs. raster, and so bounces continually between photoshop and illustrator. By doing this he has uncovered or caused problems I have never even heard of, as neophytes are wont to do. This particular problem he brought to me saying photoshop had put a thumbprint on his image. Sure enough, when I came to investigate, there was a big black splotch on the top edge of his image roughly the same shape as a thumb. Upon inspection, the splotch revealed itself to be present on all channels. My first instinct was to check the original .eps file in illustrator. Nothing doing. There were no phantom elements that had come back from the dead to haunt us. So, the next step was to import the same .eps at a lower resolution. Presto, no problem. So I tried importing at the higher resolution once more, just for fun. Our phantom bug got it's grubby little hand on the image again, and the thumbprint was back. How our engineer can't stand all them jaggy edges when he zooms into the image at 1000%, so it turns out he was trying to import the image at WAY to high a resolution to begin with. No problem, I tried to explain once again what a raster image was, and that it was unnecessary to import things at a zillion dpi to get smooth-looking edges in print. But the cat came back. A few days later, he had the same problem, but this time it was some crazed inkblot pattern that looked for all the world like an 11-legged tarantula eating a watercress sandwich. Again our skookum engineer had imported at 600 dpi (if 300 is good, 600 is better, right?), and we found if we just imported at 300 dpi things were fine. In both cases the physical dimensions of the image were about what I quoted in my original post. So the upshot was that it didn't turn into a problem. Yet I was left with the nagging reminder that I don't know everything about my tools, and that I find bothersome.
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