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1 9th July 04:17
cheryl
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Default Standard Bread Pan Size?


Hi-

Can anyone tell me what size a standard bread pan is? I've searched on
Google, and so far have come up with:

10 1/2 x 5 1/4 x 2 3/4

9 x 5 x 3

8 1/2 x 4 1/2

I'm afraid to look anymore...lol.

I'm in the US (if that matters as far as measurements go) and I'm just
looking for pans for a basic white bread recipe. I've never made bread, but
remember how good my mother's was. Unfortunately, neither she or the pans
are here anymore.

Thanks for any help!
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2 9th July 04:17
renzo
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Default Standard Bread Pan Size?


Here's what "The All New Joy of Cooking" has to say on the issue:
"Pans vary in size, but here are some general guidelines: a large 9x5x3 inch
pan holds about 2 pounds of dough; a medium 8x4x2 inch pan holds about 1-1/2
pounds of dough; a small 7x3x2 inch loaf pan holds about 1 pound of dough."

I found this interesting since I have never seen an 8x4x2 inch pan, so I'm
assuming an 8-1/2x4-1/2-2 is equivalent. This size is appropriate for a
recipe calling for 3 cups of flour.

renzo
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3 9th July 04:17
cheryl
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Default Standard Bread Pan Size?


Thanks renzo! I've copied that for future reference.
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4 9th July 04:17
dick margulis
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Default Standard Bread Pan Size?


I beg to differ with The All New Joy of Cooking, but that's a load of
something you wouldn't want to put in bread.

A "standard" one-pound loaf of commercial bakery white bread takes 17.5
or 18 oz of dough and yields 16 one-ounce slices, each a half-inch
thick. Allowing for heels and random alignment to the slicer blades,
this loaf is baked in a 8.5 x 4.5 pan that may be 2 or 2.5 in tall. Now
there is no reason in the world to assume that all breads must be the
same density; and I'm sure there are a lot of breads that ought to take
1.5 lb of dough for a loaf of those dimensions (assuming you want
something denser and chewier, made with a variety of whole grains). But
for TANJoC to be promoting dense bread as "a general guideline" is a
bunch of hooey.

A 9 x 5 x 3 loaf pan is probably more suitable for a meatloaf than
bread, but if you want a wide slice you can certainly use it. However,
it would not hold more than 24 oz of standard white bread dough (again,
more for a denser bread is fine).

As for 8 x 4 x 2, yes they exist. In one bakery where I worked we used
them for more expensive (and, coincidentally) denser breads that we
wanted to sell at a price point not too much higher than the white
bread. So, for example, we made a very rich whole wheat (lots of butter
and honey = $$), and by putting 19.5 oz in the small pan, we sold a
18-oz loaf that was proportional (same slice shape) to the white bread
but enough denser that we needed the smaller pan to keep the weight
(cost) down. It would have taken 22 oz of dough in the regular pans.
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5 9th July 04:17
graham
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Default Standard Bread Pan Size?


****:
Thanks for clarifying the N.American breadpan sizing. I have pans of the
the 3 sizes mentioned by Renzo above but rarely use them. I find them too
shallow for the type of tinned loaf that I like to make and bought deeper
pans in the UK. The "1lb" size measures about 6"x4"x2.875" and I usually
put about 400g of dough in these. The "2lb" measures about 7.5"x4.75"x3.25"
with which I use about 800g of dough .
Judging by the size and proportions of supermarket bread, commercial tinned
loaves must use a much deeper pan than is readily available for us amateurs.
As you say, the larger are only suitable for meatloaf - something I never
make:-)

Graham
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6 9th July 04:17
dick margulis
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Default Standard Bread Pan Size?


Well, of course if those really are intended to be 1 lb and 2 lb pans,
then the amount of dough you are putting in them is quite a bit less
than the nominal amount, suggesting either that your bread is quite a
bit lighter in density than whatever is "standard" in the UK or that it
is somewhat lower in profile. ("1 lb" baked weight corresponds to about
500 g of dough.)

As for the depth of commercial pans, now that I think about it, 2 inches
does sound quite short. I suspect most of our pans were 3 or 3.5 inches
tall, but don't hold me to that. Pullmans are deeper, of course, because
the bread does not rise above them.

Regarding meat loaf, I never make it in a loaf pan; I shape it by hand
in the middle of a large, flat Pyrex dish. However loaf pans are the way
to go for most patés, leberkase, headcheese, etc., where the raw mixture
is too soft to hold its shape freeform.
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7 9th July 04:17
graham
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Default Standard Bread Pan Size?


I wondered about that since I make a standard 60-63% dough for everyday use
and these pans, I suspect, are a bit smaller than British commercial sizes.
I'll have to check that out in the village bakery on my next visit.


Have you tried the poor man's version of "Boeuf en croute"? Replace the
whole beef fillet with a suitably shaped "loaf" made from minced beef.
Graham
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8 9th July 04:17
dick margulis
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Default Standard Bread Pan Size?


Would boeuf en croute be what we on the left side of the pond call Beef
Wellington? Or is it made with a different sort of dough?
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9 9th July 04:18
graham
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Default Standard Bread Pan Size?


Yes. It's the same - I wonder where the Wellington name comes from - the
Duke perhaps? Since fillet is used, it would hardly be named after the
boots;-)
If one uses a fillet, it's seared and allowed to cool before being wrapped
with puff-pastry or brioche dough (with mushrooms cooked in butter on top of
the fillet). The minced beef must be cooked more thoroughly and I don't
bother to cool it before wrapping. The pastry still puffs up nicely. I
have yet to make it with brioche dough as think that, in this instance,
pastry is easier to handle.
Graham
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10 15th July 12:07
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Default Standard Bread Pan Size?


Lets split the difference. To be precise, 1 pound is 454 grams, as we
in Canada get to see all the time, and 1 kilo is 2.205 pounds (2.2 in
our normal conversion). So 400 grams is under and 500 grams is over
by about the same distance.

454 grams is one pound, avoirdupois weight
681 grams is 1.5 pounds
908 grams is two pounds

I agree that one of you is talking about unbaked, or raw dough, being
used to bake a loaf, from the context, and the other is talking about
baked weight and the amount of unbaked dough required to produce that
pound of baked bread. So you are not talking about the same pound as
the 400 grams of raw dough, when baked, will likely produce a loaf of
about 360 grams weight, which is about three quarters of a pound.

Anyway, at be clear, how much unbaked white bread dough, in weight,
would you normally put in the various sizes of breadpan? If we get
agreement on that we will all be talking the same language.

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