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1 5th June 00:46
tim w
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Published on the website of Gourmet Magazine, six recipes by Richard
Bertinet all based on his basic 'sweet dough'. Excellent.

http://tinyurl.com/agq5al

There is also a video of the preparation of the dough with the strange
french 'slap and fold' kneading technique, although I am finding it very
slow to download.

http://www.gourmet.com/magazine/video/2008/03/bertinet_sweetdough

Tim w
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2 5th June 00:46
graham
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His basic recipe for sweet dough in his book is:

250g full fat milk (~=250ml)
15g yeast (fresh if poss.)
500g of strong bread flour
60g US butter at room temp
40g caster sugar (=berry or extra fine)
10g salt
2 large eggs

The Gourmet recipe lists 1 cup plus 2 tablespoons whole milk. What a
***bersome measure this is!
Graham
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3 5th June 00:46
boron elgar
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S'easy to me, much more so than getting out the scale and putting
various zeroed out containers on it for a mise en place such as he
had.

Boron
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4 5th June 00:46
barry harmon
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Graham,

The yeast looks like a possible source of confusion.

If it's 15 grams of fresh yeast, it should be 6 grams of active dry
yeast, or about a packet.

15 grams of active dry yeast would be about 2 packets.

Barry
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5 5th June 00:46
graham
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All part of my current annoyance with N. American recipes! I have just
taken out a book from the library with lots of great French recipes
(savouries) and then the chapter on sweet and puddings gives recipes that
start with 7 Tbsp of butter etc. I find that so frustrating, especially as
the book was first published in England and the measurements have all been
"translated" rather than equivalents given in brackets.
Rant over{;-)
Still, with the temperature going down to -30C with the windchill this w/e,
I intend making the version of Cassoulet in the book. Real,
stick-to-the-ribs stuff!
Graham
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6 5th June 00:46
barry harmon
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Carroulet should be the state dish of New Jersey, since we have so many
geese here. <g>

Barry
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7 5th June 00:46
graham
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The recipe is straight from his second book and I suppose it is misleading.
He prefers to use fresh yeast (all his basic dough recipes use it) but in
the intro, he says if you use instant, use half the amount that they
recommend on the packet. His first book doesn't have the "fresh, if
possible" addendum.
Graham
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8 5th June 00:46
boron elgar
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I have to laugh... at almost 60, I am too old to have absorbed much in
the way of consciousness about metric measures in my youth, and I had
to look up a conversion of -30C to F to know exactly how much you were
freezing your ass off!

Cassoulet sounds good. In fact, I was reading a blog I check once in
awhile and it just described a cassoulet, although with no specific
recipe. Nice photos, though. Scroll down a bit.
http://www.lastnightsdinner.net/

As one who has done her best to convey recipes from previous
generations to this one, I am as much at ease with directions such as
"about a handful" or "small teacup of..." as I am with ounces or
grams. It take a bit of work when making cakes, but I have few
problems now with breads, having it done it for so long. Printed
recipes are so error-prone anyway that I take it all in stride.

Boron
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9 5th June 00:46
bertie doe
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Over Xmas I purchased Bertinet's books 'Dough' and 'Crust'. I got them via
Amazon used traders, and both books are in mint condition. The sound quality
on one of the videos was poor, but they quickly replaced it. In his book
'Crust' he includes a lot more sourdough recipes.

I've tried his 'slap and fold' method, straight onto the worktop. I found it
fairly easy with 100% white. However, if the dough weight was above 2.5
lbs, you were perspiring heavy, after 5 mins. !!!
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10 5th June 00:46
graham
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I have an old excercise book that is at least 100 yrs old and contains a
couple of generations' recipes, all hand written in the most beautiful
copper plate. There are such recipes as Mrs. Ford's plum cake with a list
of ingredients (including the use of the gill, now, of course, an obsolete
measure) but no instructions as to mixing and baking - they were general
knowledge.
Graham
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