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1 28th December 11:06
shunaari
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Default Acetic Acid


I want to make a pickle, but on alot of ready made pickles, it states
Acetic Acid on the indredients. Is that another word for vinegar?
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2 28th December 11:06
david anthony
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Default Acetic Acid


Vinegar is a type of acetic acid. The solution they use in manufacturing is
probably differenct from supermarket vinegar, but you will get much the same
result.


David
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3 28th December 11:06
dave fawthrop
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Default Acetic Acid


| > I want to make a pickle, but on alot of ready made pickles, it states
| > Acetic Acid on the indredients. Is that another word for vinegar?
|
| Vinegar is a type of acetic acid. The solution they use in manufacturing is
| probably differenct from supermarket vinegar, but you will get much the same
| result.

More accurately all vinegars *contain* Acetic Acid. This gives the
preservative effect, othe things give the taste. For traditional taste, I
would use Supermarket Malt Vinegar. After that you can use whichever
vinegar you like. --
Dave Fawthrop <dave hyphenologist co uk> Sick of Marketing SMS
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4 28th December 11:06
john
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Default Acetic Acid


What is the difference in taste between white and brown vinegar ?
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5 28th December 11:06
bryan wallwork
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Default Acetic Acid


all vinegars will contain acetic acid, in its purest form, acetic acid is
flammable! and will freeze quite easily (the pure stuff is called glacial
acetic acid). Most vinegars contain about 5% acetic acid. They can either be
produced industrially, by which I mean the raw acetic acid is diluted to
around 5%, or brewed, when they take on different flavours. Look on a bottle
of vinegar, usually it will say whether it has been brewed or not. 'Brewed'
malt is best for fish and chips, but usually too flavoured for other foods.
Then there is cider vinegar, fine for Goan cooking, and wine vinegars. The
Chinese have black sweetened rice vinegar, and one of my favourites, called
Chiankiang vinegar, also made from rice, but full of flavour. You can make
your own. Leave wine long enough and it will turn into vinegar, as will
cider. (most of the beer around here already has turned!). Or dilute acetic
acid with other things, I like mint vinegar, fresh mint leaves (many
different kinds are best); and elderberry, just squash fresh elderberries
into a non-flavoured non-brewed vinegar, or dilute acetic acid.
Just by coincidence, I'm starting to marinate some pork for a vindaloo I'll
add a little port for authenticity....................
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
..
boom!

hope that helps
cheers
Wazza
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6 28th December 11:06
bryan wallwork
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Default Acetic Acid


<d.anthony@talk21.com>


caramel
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7 28th December 11:07
ace
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Default Acetic Acid


And malt. Or is it that that produces the caramel? In any event, there
is a noticeable difference in flavour between a decent malt vinegar
and a white one.

--
Ace in Basel - brucedotrogers a.t rochedotcom
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8 28th December 11:07
dave fawthrop
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Default Acetic Acid


| On Mon, 19 Apr 2004 19:14:18 +0000 (UTC), "Bryan Wallwork"
| <Bryan.Wallwork@btopenworld.com> wrote: |
| >
| >"John" <jmort@despammed.com> wrote in message
| >news:c60f27$3lr$1@newsg3.svr.pol.co.uk...
| >> What is the difference in taste between white and brown vinegar ?
| >
| >caramel
|
| And malt. Or is it that that produces the caramel? In any event, there
| is a noticeable difference in flavour between a decent malt vinegar
| and a white one.

Malt is produced by damping and sprouting barley, which produces sugars,
then baking the result.
http://brewery.org/brewery/library/Malt_AK0996.html

Caramel is overheated sugar solution.

So malt vinegar probably contains caramel, at least Malt Extract tastes, of
caramel to me. --
Dave Fawthrop <dave hyphenologist co uk> Sick of Marketing SMS
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9 28th December 19:04
bryan wallwork
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Default Acetic Acid


but he didn't say malt, he said brown, malt is brown, but brown is not
necessarily malt. The point is that one can have an acetic acid solution
which has no taste at all. Brown is lovely in the right place, and can be
brewed, but brown vinegar could be a 'non-brewed condiment'.
cheers
Wazza
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10 28th December 19:04
bryan wallwork
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Posts: 1
Default Acetic Acid


I rather think caramel is formed from sugar without water, it needs the
higher temperature.
cheers
Wazza
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