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1 10th July 06:47
elaine jones
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Default Which little pot of yoghurt drink?


In Corwen it makes no difference - there's only the one available.

However in other places there is a multitude of little pots of yoghurt
drink, each stating that it contains a particularly beneficial strain of
bacteria.

So, of these numerous lacto-bacilli, is any one more beneficial than the
rest (or do the yoghurts contain a few bacteria but only one is being
mentioned)?

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2 10th July 06:48
mark blewett
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Posts: 1
Default Which little pot of yoghurt drink?


I doubt it.. call me a cynic but man/womankind has survived for the
last few thousand years without small plastic pots of yoghurt.

Tho I haven't done a scientific research.. my guess is that its
marketing.. in my quiick searches lactobacilli is used to produce
youghut (http://www.dairyconsultant.co.uk/pages/yoghurt.htm).. it also
appears in the intestine .. so I fear the sales people took over )

I'm no expert.. that just my personal opinion.
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3 10th July 06:48
dave fawthrop
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Default Which little pot of yoghurt drink?


| In Corwen it makes no difference - there's only the one available.
|
| However in other places there is a multitude of little pots of yoghurt
| drink, each stating that it contains a particularly beneficial strain of
| bacteria.

*All* Lacto bacilli are good for you. The rest is marketing and best
ignored. Eat whichever yogurt tastes best to you.

Note especially that non of the adverti*****ts say "our bacteria is better
than others" because they would have to prove that to the Advertising
Standards Authority, and they can not do that.

| So, of these numerous lacto-bacilli, is any one more beneficial than the
| rest (or do the yoghurts contain a few bacteria but only one is being
| mentioned)?

All yoghurts are cram jam full of bacteria. They are produced in fairly
sterile conditions using a starter, so each tub will contain almost
exclusively one strain of bacteria.

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4 10th July 06:48
ophelia
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Posts: 1
Default Which little pot of yoghurt drink?


Damn there was a report in yesterday's paper and it has gone with the
binman There was only one good probiotic and it was a powder or pill I
think. (Can't remember the name sorry) Of the yoghurty ones only Yaccult
(sp) was found *satisfactory*
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5 10th July 06:48
larrylard
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Posts: 1
Default Which little pot of yoghurt drink?


But they are all 'great tasting', the adverts say so!

I cannot be alone in being somewhat sceptical of the taste of a
foodstuff we are so ********ly *told* tastes nice. I bet the reality
is different

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6 10th July 06:48
mc_emily
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Posts: 1
Default Which little pot of yoghurt drink?


You're right, we have! However, one of the reasons we need it now is that
we use antibiotics extensively, and these kill off the probiotics found
naturally in the gut. It'd a good idea to eat a couple of potfuls of live
yoghurt after a course of antibiotics, just to re-introduce the 'good'
bacteria back into the gut. Otherwise, there's not a lot of point as the
gut is teeming with them anyway. Like you said, it's all a lot of
advertising hype!!

Jaqy


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7 10th July 19:18
mark blewett
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Posts: 1
Default Which little pot of yoghurt drink?


Thats what I would of thought... but there was an interesting
paragraph in the link I posted
(http://www.dairyconsultant.co.uk/pages/yoghurt.htm) about the starter
culture;

"The starter culture for most yogurt production is blend of
Streptococcus salivarius subsp. thermophilus (ST) and Lactobacillus
delbrueckii subspecies bulgaricus (LB). Although they can grow
independantly, the rate of acid production is much higher when used
together than either of the two organisms grown individually. ST grows
faster and produces both acid and carbon dioxide. The formate and
carbon dioxide produced stimulates LB growth. On the other hand, the
proteolytic activity of LB produces stimulatory peptides and amino
acids for use by ST. These microorganisms are responsible for the
formation of typical yogurt flavour and texture. The yogurt mixture
coagulates during fermentation due to the drop in pH. The streptococci
are responsible for the initial pH drop of the yogurt mix to
approximately 5.0. The lactobacilli are responsible for a further
decrease to pH 4.0. The following fermentation products contibute to
flavour:
lactic acid
acetaldehyde
acetic acid
diacetyl"

Regards
Mark
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8 10th July 19:18
mark blewett
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Posts: 1
Default Which little pot of yoghurt drink?


Thanks.. I didn't know that antibiotics upset the body's normal
balance of gut microbes. You learn something new everyday!

Hardly surprising since I purposely rarely take any medicine unless
absolutely needed.. for example I'm more likely to find that a pack of
asprin has gone out of date than actually use them )

I'd still question how affective a couple of pots of live yoghurt are,
after all the stomach is quiite a hostile place... then again even if
a few thousand out of billions make the journey.. they will still
multiply in the gut.

Just another thought.. since milk production/home hygiene is become so
sterile compared to say upto 50 years ago (when commonly a jug of milk
would have be left out in a cool place), does this mean that
healthwise we are loosing out now, because we don't get the natural
intake of various useful bacteria?
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9 10th July 19:18
nik&andy
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Posts: 1
Default Which little pot of yoghurt drink?


Its a common theory that the rise in allergies is partly down to an increase
in home hygiene. Also, less children are brought up with animals these days
and apparently there is a correlation between asthma and pet free homes.
(Although I suspect the correlation between parental smoking and childhood
asthma is stronger!)

Nik

Notice I didn't climb too high on my soapbox in my current condition ;-)
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10 10th July 19:18
dave fawthrop
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Posts: 1
Default Which little pot of yoghurt drink?


| On Wed, 27 Oct 2004 06:45:23 +0100, Dave Fawthrop
| <hyphen@hyphenologist.co.uk> wrote:
| >All yoghurts are cram jam full of bacteria. They are produced in fairly
| >sterile conditions using a starter, so each tub will contain almost
| >exclusively one strain of bacteria.
|
| Thats what I would of thought... but there was an interesting
| paragraph in the link I posted
| (http://www.dairyconsultant.co.uk/pages/yoghurt.htm) about the starter
| culture;
|
| "The starter culture for most yogurt production is blend of
| Streptococcus salivarius subsp. thermophilus (ST) and Lactobacillus
| delbrueckii subspecies bulgaricus (LB).

OK two strains.

AFAIK the various manufacturers hold the strains of these bacteria used
very close to their chests because they define the taste of the finished
product.

--
Dave F
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