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1 22nd April 03:49
wayne boatwright
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Default FibraMent Baking Stones?


Anyone using one of these? I have to replace a broken pizza stone and wonder
if the FibraMent is really an improvement over the average baking stone.

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2 22nd April 03:50
chris marksberry
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Default FibraMent Baking Stones?


wonder

Wayne,

I don't have a Fibrament, so I can't answer that (but I did look them up).
Just a thought that might save you a few bucks and provide an excellent
stone would be the pizza stone that is made by the Big Green Egg people.
Very thick and sturdy and made to withstand high temps.

Chris in Pearland, TX
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3 22nd April 03:50
wayne boatwright
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Default FibraMent Baking Stones?


Oh pshaw, on Sun 22 Oct 2006 07:20:23p, Chris Marksberry meant to say...


up).


Thanks, Chris. I'll take a look at it. The Fibrament is a bit pricy.


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4 22nd April 03:50
green mtn. griller
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Default FibraMent Baking Stones?


Have you "googled" them? I took just a quick look, but some of the returns
are for sites that have forums, pizzamaking.com for one, which have some
favorable posts. Perhaps you could get some "testimonials" from the
company? They are a bit pricey, but free shipping, 10 yr. warranty (didn't
see any details, though) and the thickness of the stone (durability and heat
retention) may tip the scales a bit...?
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5 22nd April 03:50
wayne boatwright
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Default FibraMent Baking Stones?


Oh pshaw, on Sun 22 Oct 2006 10:40:35p, Green Mtn. Griller meant to say...

Yes, actually I have. However, I was interested in hearing from some
people I "know" on rfe. Given the specs and the warranty it seems like a
better quality stone than most I've looked at.

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6 22nd April 03:50
chris shenton
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Default FibraMent Baking Stones?


After my two round ceramic stones cracked, I got a rectangular
Fibrement that fits just right in my oven. Seems to work well. No
sign of stress, even after repeated long heatings at 555F with
convection on. Yeah, a bit more pricey than I wanted to spend. :-(
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7 22nd April 03:50
ray_manor
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Default FibraMent Baking Stones?


Quik thought. Have been baking bread (including flat bread) daily for
over five years with steam and on a sandstone . The stone is sort the
sort widely sold as a baking stone for around $30, Williams Sanoma.

When reading the FAQ's at Fibrament's website I was disatisfied with
their non-answer to the question whether Fibrament would absorb
moisture. They begged the question, responding that water would
evaporate at 500 degrees is no answer. One of the things porus
sandstone does is permit water vapor to leave the dough and enter the
stone. This aids in acheiving a crisper crust on the bottom of the
loaf/ pie. Apparantly the Fibrament is not porus. I will stick
with a porus stone. (The quary tile I have tried are not in the same
category as sandstone.)

While on the subject of stones, an observation on rectangular vs
round. I have found it helped to have the retangular shape because
midway through baking the laof/pie can be moved to the other side of
the stone which will not have given its heat to the dough. This
provides better control of the loaf/pie bottom. A crisper crust.

bon a petit
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8 22nd April 03:51
wayne boatwright
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Default FibraMent Baking Stones?


Oh pshaw, on Mon 23 Oct 2006 03:19:04p, Chris Shenton meant to say...


Thanks, Chris. It's nice to hear from someone who has actually used one.

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9 22nd April 03:51
wayne boatwright
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Default FibraMent Baking Stones?


Oh pshaw, on Mon 23 Oct 2006 09:25:03p, meant to say...


You raise a good point, Ray. One of the reasons I use a baking stone at
all is to wick away moisture from the dough, especially for pizza, French
bread, and rustic loaves. Bakings stones i've used in the past have been
porous. hmm...

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10 22nd April 19:16
kent
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Default FibraMent Baking Stones?


I agree. I have used a stone for years and thousands of pizzas.
The stone must be porous to absorb moisture from the dough.
The thick heavy stone retains more heat throughout the cooking period.
A thin wimpy stone loses heat and the surface temp. drops from the moment
the pizza
is placed on it.
Kent
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