Mombu the Cuisine Forum sponsored links

Go Back   Mombu the Cuisine Forum > Cuisine > Study Says Going Veggie can Lead to Brain Shrinkage
User Name
Password
REGISTER NOW! Mark Forums Read

sponsored links


Reply
 
1 19th September 14:44
dragonblaze
External User
 
Posts: 1
Default Study Says Going Veggie can Lead to Brain Shrinkage


Scientists have found that consuming vegetarian, meat-free diet leads
to brain shrinkage.

According to researchers, vegans and vegetarians are the most likely
to be deficient because the best sources of the vitamin are meat,
particularly liver, milk and fish.

Vitamin B12 deficiency can also cause anaemia and inflammation of the
nervous system.

Yeast extracts are one of the few vegetarian foods which provide good
levels of the vitamin, reports Courier Mail.

The finding was made by Oxford University scientists who used memory
tests, physical checks and brain scans to examine 107 people between
the ages of 61 and 87.

When the volunteers were retested five years later the medics found
those with the lowest levels of vitamin B12 were also the most likely
to have brain shrinkage.

It confirms earlier research showing a link between brain atrophy and
low levels of B12.

Also, in a new study it was found that drinking too much alcohol can
lead to brain shrinkage.

Brain scans of more than 1,800 people found that people who downed 14
drinks or more a week had 1.6 per cent more brain shrinkage than
teetotallers.

Women in their seventies were the most at risk.

http://www.medindia.net/news/Study-Says-Going-Veggie-can-Lead-to-Brain-Shrinkage-41809-1.htm
  Reply With Quote


  sponsored links


2 19th September 14:44
pearl
External User
 
Posts: 1
Default Study Says Going Veggie can Lead to Brain Shrinkage


No they haven't.

'Commenting on the findings, Vogiatzoglou said:

"Many factors that affect brain health are thought to be out of our control,
but this study suggests that simply adjusting our diets to consume more
vitamin B12 through eating meat, fish, fortified cereals or milk may be
something we can easily adjust to prevent brain shrinkage and so perhaps
save our memory."
...
Vitamin B12 deficiency is a recognized public health problem, particularly
among older people, so increasing B12 intake could help to reduce the
problem.
...
Read the abstract: http://www.neurology.org/cgi/content/abstract/71/11/826 http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/120899.php


Where do the researchers say this? Show us an actual quote.

'Are You Vitamin B12 Deficient?

Nearly two-fifths of the U.S. population may be flirting with marginal
vitamin B12 status - that is, if a careful look at nearly 3,000 men and
women in the ongoing Framingham (Massachusetts) Offspring Study
is any indication. Researchers found that 39 percent of the volunteers
have plasma B12 levels in the "low normal" range - below 258
picomoles per liter (pmol/L).
...
The researchers found no association between plasma B12 and meat,
poultry, and fish intake, even though these foods supply the bulk of B12
in the diet. "It's not because people aren't eating enough meat," Tucker
says. "The vitamin isn't getting absorbed."

The vitamin is tightly bound to proteins in meat and dairy products and
requires high acidity to cut it loose. As we age, we lose the acid-secreting
cells in the stomach.
...'
http://www.ars.usda.gov/is/AR/archive/aug00/vita0800.htm

'Shrinkage is usually associated with the development of dementia.
...
- 1 in 3 people over 65 will die with dementia.

- 700,000 people in the UK have a form of dementia, more than half have
Alzheimer's disease. In less than 20 years nearly a million people will be
living with dementia. This will soar to 1.7 million people by 2051.
...'
http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/120797.php

Are these "1 in 3 people" veg*n?

'Studies have shown that risk for AD is greater in people who consume
diets high in cholesterol, saturated fats, and total calories and low in fiber,
vegetables, and fruits.3,4,5 Such diets seem to play a role in the formation
of beta-amyloid plaques and in causing oxidative damage to neurons.6,7,
8,9 This is also supported by data demonstrating a decreased risk of AD
with use of lipid-lowering medications10,11 and by preliminary findings
in one study, which showed an increased incidence in dementia in heavy
meat eaters compared with vegetarians.12
...'
http://www.pcrm.org/health/prevmed/diet_alzheimers.html
  Reply With Quote
3 19th September 14:44
External User
 
Posts: 1
Default Study Says Going Veggie can Lead to Brain Shrinkage


You have in the past explained how you think non-existent
frogs survive the draining of rice fields, etc. Think about that...
  Reply With Quote


  sponsored links


4 19th September 14:44
rudy canoza
External User
 
Posts: 1
Default Study Says Going Veggie can Lead to Brain Shrinkage


Goo - ****wit David Harrison, Stupidist SPAMMER, stupid pig-****ing
cracker - woke up and said, "How can I be even *more* stupid today than
I was yesterday?", and so he lied:


You have in the past blabbered that non-existent animals can be "denied"
something; how they can experience "unfairness"; how they can experience
"loss" and "deprivation". Those are your true thoughts, not "mistakes".

Think about that, then realize what a stupid ****ing cracker you are.
  Reply With Quote
5 19th September 14:44
systemx
External User
 
Posts: 1
Default Study Says Going Veggie can Lead to Brain Shrinkage


That is a lie.

Q.Where in the ORIGINAL study does it come to that conclusion?

snipped BS.
  Reply With Quote
6 19th September 14:44
rudy canoza
External User
 
Posts: 1
Default Study Says Going Veggie can Lead to Brain Shrinkage


Sorry, ShitstainX - once again, you ****ed up.

http://www.neurology.org/cgi/content/abstract/71/11/826?maxtoshow=&HITS=10&hits=10&RESULTFORMAT=&fulltext=b12&andorexactfulltext=and&searchid=1&FIRSTINDEX=0&sortspec=relevance&resourcetype=HWCIT

Vitamin B12 status and rate of brain volume loss in community-dwelling
elderly
A. Vogiatzoglou, MSc, H. Refsum, MD, PhD, C. Johnston, S. M. Smith,
DPhil, K. M. Bradley, FRCR, FRCP, C. de Jager, PhD, M. M. Budge, MD and
A. D. Smith, DPhil, FMedSci

From OPTIMA (A.V., H.R., C.J., K.M.B., C.d.J., M.M.B., A.D.S.),
Department of Physiology, Anatomy and Genetics, University of Oxford,
UK; Institute of Basic Medical Sciences (A.V., H.R.), Department of
Nutrition, University of Oslo, Norway; Oxford University Centre for
Functional MRI of the Brain (S.M.S.), UK; and Department of Geriatric
Medicine (M.M.B.), The Canberra Hospital and Australian National
University Medical School, Australia.

Address correspondence and reprint requests to Anna Vogiatzoglou,
Department of Physiology, Anatomy and Genetics, University of Oxford, Le
Gros Clark Building, South Parks Rd., Oxford OX1 3QX, UK
anna.vogiatzoglou@dpag.ox.ac.uk

Objectives: To investigate the relationship between markers of vitamin
B12 status and brain volume loss per year over a 5-year period in an
elderly population.

Methods: A prospective study of 107 community-dwelling volunteers aged
61 to 87 years without cognitive impairment at enrollment. Volunteers
were assessed yearly by clinical examination, MRI scans, and cognitive
tests. Blood was collected at baseline for measurement of plasma vitamin
B12, transcobalamin (TC), holotranscobalamin (holoTC), methylmalonic
acid (MMA), total homocysteine (tHcy), and serum folate.

Results: The decrease in brain volume was greater among those with lower
vitamin B12 and holoTC levels and higher plasma tHcy and MMA levels at
baseline. Linear regression ****ysis showed that associations with
vitamin B12 and holoTC remained significant after adjustment for age,
***, creatinine, education, initial brain volume, cognitive test scores,
systolic blood pressure, ApoE {varepsilon}4 status, tHcy, and folate.
Using the upper (for the vitamins) or lower tertile (for the
metabolites) as reference in logistic regression ****ysis and adjusting
for the above covariates, vitamin B12 in the bottom tertile (<308
pmol/L) was associated with increased rate of brain volume loss (odds
ratio 6.17, 95% CI 1.2530.47). The association was similar for low
levels of holoTC (<54 pmol/L) (odds ratio 5.99, 95% CI 1.2129.81) and
for low TC saturation. High levels of MMA or tHcy or low levels of
folate were not associated with brain volume loss.

Conclusion: Low vitamin B12 status should be further investigated as a
modifiable cause of brain atrophy and of likely subsequent cognitive
impairment in the elderly.


It isn't being vegetarian per se; it's being deficient in B12, something
vegetarians *commonly* are unless they take supplements.
  Reply With Quote
7 19th September 14:44
systemx
External User
 
Posts: 1
Default Study Says Going Veggie can Lead to Brain Shrinkage


Well done, go to top of the class, now FOAD.

The study, bum-breath, was about the elderly, the elderly are *commonly*
deficient of B12, if they eat meat or not.

There was NO evidence of a link between vegetarian and brain waisting, NONE.
  Reply With Quote
8 19th September 14:44
rudy canoza
External User
 
Posts: 1
Default Study Says Going Veggie can Lead to Brain Shrinkage


YOU **** off and die, 2nd Jizzstain of Chris or Marks de Shitbag or
whatever ****y nym of yours I've forgotten.


Prove it, jizzstain.
  Reply With Quote
9 19th September 14:44
systemx
External User
 
Posts: 1
Default Study Says Going Veggie can Lead to Brain Shrinkage


You can look as well as I can; lazy boy.

Here's a few:

(1) Vitamin B-12 deficiency in the elderly: current dilemmas

SP Stabler, J Lindenbaum and RH Allen
Department of Medicine, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center,
Denver 80220, USA.

Vitamin B-12 deficiency is present in up to 15% of the elderly
population as do***ented by elevated methylmalonic acid with or without
elevated total homocysteine concentrations in combination with low or
low-normal vitamin B-12 concentrations.

(2) Metabolic evidence that deficiencies of vitamin B-12 (cobalamin),
folate, and vitamin B-6 occur commonly in elderly people [published
erratum appears in Am J Clin Nutr 1994 Jul;60(1):147]

E Joosten, A van den Berg, R Riezler, HJ Naurath, J Lindenbaum, SP
Stabler and RH Allen
Department of Internal Medicine, University Hospitals KU Leuven, Belgium.

Measurements of the serum concentrations of the metabolites
homocysteine, cystathionine, methylmalonic acid, and 2-methylcitric
acid, which ac***ulates when vitamin B-12-, folate-, and vitamin B-6-
dependent enzymatic reactions are impaired, should provide a better
indication of intracellular deficiency of these vitamins.

(3) Prevalence of cobalamin deficiency in the Framingham elderly population

J Lindenbaum, IH Rosenberg, PW Wilson, SP Stabler and RH Allen
Department of Medicine, Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center, New York, NY 10032.
The prevalence of cobalamin deficiency was > or = 12% in a large sample
of free-living elderly Americans. Many elderly people with "normal"
serum vitamin concentrations are metabolically deficient in cobalamin or
folate.
  Reply With Quote
10 19th September 14:44
jerry
External User
 
Posts: 1
Default Study Says Going Veggie can Lead to Brain Shrinkage


http://www.naturalnews.com/News_000285_Vitamin_B12_vegans_vegetarians.html
--- [ begin quote] ---
Health Ranger comment: Sometimes the media is so downright stupid, you
gotta wonder if their writers are on crack. This article from
IndiaTimes quotes research about vitamin B12 deficiency to claim that
vegetarians and vegans suffer from "brain shrinkage." Nobody told
them, I guess, that Vitamin B12 is made by bacteria! You can get all
the B12 you need from non-animal sources. It's a no-brainer (ahem!).
But I guess for the journalists who eat a diet of dead meat, processed
cheese and homogenized milk, their brains aren't functioning well
enough to be able to handle a little nutritional logic in the first
place... In the war between the smarts of vegans vs. the smarts of
steak eaters, there's simply no competition...
--- [ end quote ] ---
  Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools
Display Modes




Copyright 2006 SmartyDevil.com - Dies Mies Jeschet Boenedoesef Douvema Enitemaus -
666