Mombu the Culture Forum sponsored links

Go Back   Mombu the Culture Forum > Culture > CUBA: Speech by U.S. Chief of Mission James C. Cason on the Occasion of the Fourth of July Celebration
User Name
Password
REGISTER NOW! Mark Forums Read

sponsored links


Reply
 
1 15th July 16:02
pm
External User
 
Posts: 1
Default CUBA: Speech by U.S. Chief of Mission James C. Cason on the Occasion of the Fourth of July Celebration


Objet: Eng/Esp: Date: mercredi 6 juillet 2005 21:48

(Discurso en español abajo)


Senior U.S. Official in Cuba Says Change Is Inevitable Departing Chief of Mission Cason reflects on efforts to support democracy

-Speech by U.S. Chief of Mission James C. Cason
on the Occasion of the Fourth of July Celebration


Change is inevitable in Cuba, and the United States and others will work with the Cuban people as they build a democratic and prosperous country, says James Cason, chief of mission at the U.S. Interests Section in Havana.

In his July 4 final remarks to the U.S. Interests Section before leaving his post, Cason outlined U.S. efforts to encourage a democratic, free and prosperous Cuba, focusing in particular on efforts to assist Cuban pro-democracy activists.

As part of these efforts, Cason noted, the United States has increased the amount of uncensored information available to Cubans, including books, radios, newspapers, and extensive free and uncensored Internet access. The U.S. official pointed out that the United States also engages Cubans via video-conferences on issues such as democratic transitions, rule of law, and market economies.

Within this context, however, Cason stressed that the U.S. Interests Section has not given -- and does not give -- money to members of Cuba's civil society.

Cason also defended U.S. efforts against complaints that they are overly "provocative."

He said: "Is it provocative to point out that Cubans live under one of the most repressive regimes in the world? Is it provocative to remind Western journalists of Cuba's 300 political prisoners? Is it outside the scope of normal diplomatic activity to provide uncensored information to Cubans? [Is] holding events for pro-democratic Cuban dissidents or their family members provocative? Should we instead abandon Cubans to isolation from the real world?"

Cason added that nothing has come from being polite to Cuban dictator Fidel Castro. Moreover, he indicated that if the United States thought keeping quiet or lifting the U.S. embargo on Cuba would encourage political reforms, the United States would be quiet and resume commercial ties with Cuba.

Reflecting on Cuba's future, Cason said that the Castro regime is on its last legs, and significant change is inevitable.

"I'm confident that the Cuban people will not be satisfied with a partial economic opening, but will demand that Cuba undergo a thorough democratic transition," he said.

In the meantime, Cason encouraged the Cuban people to be ready to work for democratic change, adding that they can count on continued U.S. support.

"When that time comes, the United States and others will be at your side to help you build a democratic, prosperous Cuba -- a Cuba where all Cubans can realize their dreams," he said.

Following is the text of Cason's prepared remarks:

By Scott Miller
Washington File Staff Writer

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Speech by U.S. Chief of Mission James C. Cason
on the Occasion of the Fourth of July Celebration

Havana, Cuba
July 4, 2005


Ladies and gentlemen, after almost three years in Cuba, this will be my last opportunity to address you. I'd like to share with you some reflections on my time here.

Despite my best efforts to prepare for my job in Cuba, the island took me by surprise.

I arrived under the illusion that I might be able to pragmatically engage Cuban officials on issues of mutual concern. Fidel, it appears, didn't trust his officials meeting with me. So I was assigned a MinRex [Ministry of Foreign Affairs] "handler" incapable of straying from the world according to [Cuban government newspaper] "Granma."

My initial dealings with the Cuban regime quickly brought home to me that in Cuba appearances are fundamentally deceiving. Castro's Cuba is one big Potemkin village. If you go more than three blocks behind the main tourist thoroughfares, you will see the shabbiness and decay of the real Cuba. If you reach out to average Cubans, you will understand what this place is all about. And that is precisely what the Cuban regime does not want us to do.

To better learn about the real Cuba, I traveled seven thousand miles across the island in my first six months. I met with hundreds of average Cubans. All were proud to be Cubans. All were intensely curious about the world, especially about the United States. Many asked for greater global attention to pro-democracy efforts on the island. Many others asked how they could immigrate to the United States.

I remember meeting a group of balseros [rafters] the U.S. Coast Guard had picked up at sea and returned to Cuba. One man told me that he had tried 26 times to raft illegally to the United States. He vowed to keep on trying until he got there, or the sharks ate him. You have to admire that kind of determination. I later learned that all those balseros were arrested for having met with me.

For a person who has not lived under totalitarian rule, it is hard to grasp what life is like when the State dominates all facets of society. Simply put, ****ytically understanding how a totalitarian regime functions is not the same thing as seeing people bound by its shackles. I now understand that:

-- To appreciate the sterility of the Castro regime's propaganda, one has to hear it day-in and day-out, week after deadening week.

-- To comprehend this regime's enormous wastage of human talent, one has to see how it stifles all independent initiative and freedom of expression.

-- To understand why two million Cubans have forsaken everything they cherish on the island to start new lives abroad and millions others want to join them, one needs to see the threadbare, intolerant environment that confines them.

My conversations with a wide spectrum of Cubans sharpened my own thinking about what I could accomplish in Cuba. I wanted to encourage Cubans to think about ensuring that their country will someday be democratic, free and prosperous. I also wanted to find creative new ways to help Cuban pro-democracy activists get themselves heard on the island and throughout the world.

How have we advanced these two goals in practical terms? We increased the amount of uncensored information -- in the form of books, magazines, newspapers, and radios -- we make available to Cubans. We offer Cubans extensive free, uncensored Internet access. We bring together Cubans on the island with people on the outside through videoconferences on such issues as democratic transitions, rule of law, and market economies. We provide classes on journalism for those daring enough to write about Cuba as they see it.

As you all know, in Cuba none of us are allowed to speak publicly about democracy or freedom. So I decided to use symbols to our best advantage. You may recall the big sign with the number "75" we added to our holiday decorations last year. Thanks to the extensive media coverage that "75" sign received, the world was reminded that innocent Cubans are thrown into jail for having a different point of view than Castro's. And that "75" sign also enabled Habaneros to learn that the world is appalled by Castro's arbitrary incarceration of political prisoners.

To help people visualize the inhumane conditions in which these political prisoners are confined, my colleagues and I came up with another symbol. We built an exact replica of the Cuban punishment cell that confined a courageous prisoner of conscience, Dr. Oscar Elias Biscet. It also was reported by the media, and is now seen daily by hundreds of Cuban visitors to the Interests Section.

Why use such symbols? Because symbols are especially powerful in closed societies where governments control the media and censor all information.

Let me address those who think it's more dignified to protest the Cuban regime's repression behind closed doors or who think Castro will be more generous if we don't aggravate him. In short, those who think that I'm overly "provocative."

Is it provocative to point out that Cubans live under one of the most repressive regimes in the world? Is it provocative to remind western journalists of Cuba's 300 political prisoners? Is it outside the scope of normal diplomatic activity to provide uncensored information to Cubans? Are holding events for pro-democratic Cuban dissidents or their family members provocative? Should we instead abandon Cubans to isolation from the real world?

Nothing will come -- indeed, in almost 47 years nothing has come -- from being polite to a dictator. If we thought that keeping quiet would bring about political reforms, we would be quiet. If we thought that lifting the U.S. embargo would result in a democratic Cuba, we would have 747's full of Americans on the tarmac tomorrow.

Castro may have grossly mismanaged Cuba's economy, saddled Cubans with huge debts, and become dependent on foreign sugar daddies, but never doubt his control over his Potemkin village. He will allow nothing to jeopardize his total control over all aspects of Cuban life. Look how he has sought to prevent tourists from "contaminating" Cubans to want things they cannot have. He made the tourist enclaves off limits to average Cubans, and enforced this segregation through an intricate network of controls. Look also how all business ventures with foreigners enrich the Cuban regime's coffers without promoting financial independence among Cubans. As the cautionary tale of the former Cuban Foreign Minister Roibana so vividly illustrates, Castro will ruthlessly punish any official who ever so discreetly tries to portray himself as an incipient reformer.

Castro often portrays his wrath against the United States as a battle between a Cuban David against the U.S. Goliath. You may find this ironic, but we at the Interests Section are the David trying to face down Castro's enormous repressive apparatus. We are confined to Havana. Cuban intelligence agents monitor our every move and harass our officers. Cubans who deal with us are exposed to the regime's surveillance and arbitrary reprisals.

Yet the Cuban regime has not managed to scare away pro-democratic activists from meeting with us. So it absurdly maintains that all those who meet with us are "mercenaries" in our pay. Please take note: the U.S. Interests Section has not given and does not give money to members of Cuba's civil society. Do others off the island, especially the Cuban exile community, provide financial help to average Cubans, including dissidents? Of course, and we applaud their generosity.

I've certainly had my share of frustrations during my time here. In particular, I've found it difficult getting some foreign visitors to see that behind Castro's Potemkin village is a cynical, ruthless totalitarian system.

Cuba is hard for Americans to understand because we don't have to worry that our criticism of our own government or society will bring harm to our loved ones. We have difficulty in comprehending a society that regiments all facets of our lives. And like virtually all other foreign visitors, Americans find it hard to grasp how the Cuban regime captures virtually all of the financial benefits of Cuba's limited links with the outside world.

I will leave Cuba with multiple, unforgettable images of Cubans' desperation to leave their own country, despite the island's beauty, the warmth of its people, and Cuba's marvelous music, dance and art.

The most vivid of these images is of a would-be hijacker who commandeered a plane at a local airport. I was asked by the Cuban authorities to talk to him. "I don't believe that you are Cason," the hijacker told me. So I walked out on the tarmac to warn him that he would be facing a long prison sentence in the U.S. if he went through with his plan. The hijacker replied that "I would rather go to jail for 20 years in the U.S. than stay in Cuba." He forced the plane to depart for the U.S., was arrested upon landing, and was later sentenced to 22 years in prison. Can there be a more telling indictment of a regime when such a huge percentage of its citizens passionately dream of abandoning their country for another?

America's greatness has been the result of attracting immigrants from all over the world. Two million Cubans have found refuge and success in our country. Our gain has been Cuba's loss. Think of what Cuba could have been today if all the talent and energy that went into making Miami what it is had remained in Cuba.

But Castro's jury-rigged system cannot last long -- everyone knows that it does not work and is held together by the force of one domineering personality. And that personality is literally on his last legs. Change is inevitable. I'm confident that the Cuban people will not be satisfied with a partial economic opening, but will demand that Cuba undergo a thorough democratic transition.

Don't abandon your Patria [homeland], is my advice to Cubans. Stay and be ready for when the personality withers away. Stay and be ready to work for democratic change. When that time comes, the United States and others will be at your side to help you build a democratic, prosperous Cuba -- a Cuba where all Cubans can realize their dreams.

America's symbol of promise to its immigrants is well known. What will be the symbol of the democratic, prosperous Cuba of the future remains to be seen. But given the dynamism that a free Cuba will unleash, I'm sure that its symbol will also be powerfully compelling.

If I could leave my Cuban friends with one final thought, it would be: "kachán, kachán -- d*as mejores pronto vendrán."

Thank you.


Collaboration:
http://usinfo.state.gov/dhr/Archive/2005/Jul/06-853982.html?chanlid=democracy

__________________________________________________ ___________


PALABRAS DEL JEFE DE MISION, SR. JAMES C. CASON, CON MOTIVO DE LA FIESTA NACIONAL DEL 4 DE JULIO


JULIO 4, 2005
Señoras y señores:

Después de casi tres años de permanencia en Cuba, ésta será la última oportunidad en que me dirija a ustedes. Por ello, quisiera que compartiéramos juntos algunas reflexiones fruto de mi estancia en este pa*s.

A pesar de mis mejores esfuerzos por prepararme para mi trabajo en Cuba, esta isla me tomó por sorpresa.

Llegué con la ilusión de que quizás pudiera involucrar pragmáticamente a los funcionarios cubanos en temas de interés mutuo. Como al parecer Fidel no confiaba en las reuniones entre sus funcionarios y yo, el MINREX me asignó un “negociante” incapaz de apartarse del mundo concebido según el periódico Granma.

Mis tratos iniciales con el régimen cubano me mostraron con toda claridad que en Cuba las apariencias son fundamentalmente descorazonadoras. La Cuba de Castro es una gran aldea Potemkin, es decir, una gran fachada. Si uno camina tres cuadras más allá de los principales sitios de atracción tur*stica, se encuentra con el deterioro y el aspecto lastimoso que ofrece la verdadera Cuba. Si uno extiende su mano al cubano promedio, comprende lo que existe en todas partes. Y eso es, precisamente, lo que el régimen cubano no quiere que hagamos.

Durante mis primeros seis meses de misión, viajé 7 mil millas a través de la Isla con el fin de conocer mejor la Cuba verdadera. Me reun* con cientos de cubanos comunes y corrientes. Todos se enorgullec*an de ser cubanos. Todos experimentaban una curiosidad intensa por conocer el mundo, especialmente los Estados Unidos. Muchos solicitaban una mayor atención global hacia los esfuerzos que, en pro de la democracia, se realizan en la Isla. Muchos otros preguntaban cómo podr*an emigrar a los Estados Unidos.

Recuerdo la ocasión en que me reun* con un grupo de balseros recogidos por un guardacostas estadounidense y posteriormente devueltos a Cuba. Un hombre me confesó que hab*a intentado veintiséis veces abandonar ilegalmente el pa*s en una balsa. Y prometió seguir intentándolo hasta que lo lograra o los tiburones lo devoraran. Uno no puede menos que admirar este tipo de determinación. Después supe que todos estos balseros hab*an sido arrestados por haberse reunido conmigo.

A una persona que no ha vivido bajo un gobierno totalitario, le resulta muy dif*cil captar lo que es la vida cuando el Estado domina todos los aspectos de la sociedad. Dicho de una forma más sencilla: comprender *****ticamente cómo funciona un régimen totalitario no es lo mismo que ver a las personas atadas a sus grilletes. Ahora entiendo que:

- Para poder apreciar la esterilidad de la propaganda del régimen castrista, uno tiene que o*rla d*a tras d*a, semana tras semana.

-- Para poder comprender el enorme desperdicio de talento humano que el régimen lleva a cabo, uno tiene que ver cómo asfixia toda iniciativa independiente y toda tentativa de libre expresión.

-- Para poder entender por qué dos millones de cubanos han renunciado a lo que más amaban en la Isla con tal de emprender una nueva vida y otros millones desean unirse a ellos, uno tiene que ver el entorno ra*do e intolerante en el que están confinados.

Las conversaciones que sostuve con un amplio espectro de cubanos agudizaron mis criterios sobre lo que podr*a realizar en Cuba. Quise estimular a los cubanos de manera que pudieran pensar cómo hacer para que su pa*s fuera, algún d*a, democrático, libre y próspero. También quise encontrar nuevas y creativas v*as de ayudar a que la voz de los activistas cubanos a favor de la democracia pudiera ser escuchada dentro y fuera de la Isla.

En términos prácticos: ¿en qué medida avanzamos en la consecución de estos dos objetivos? Hemos aumentado el número de información sin censura --ya sea en forma de libros, revistas, periódicos y radios— y la hemos puesto al alcance de los cubanos. Les hemos ofrecido un acceso libre y amplio a Internet. Los hemos puesto en contacto con personas residentes en el extranjero, a través de videoconferencias sobre temas tales como transiciones democráticas, estado de derecho y econom*as de mercado. Hemos brindado cursos de periodismo a aquéllos que se han atrevido a escribir sobre Cuba tal y como la ven.

Como todos ustedes saben, a ninguno de nosotros se nos permite hablar públicamente en Cuba sobre democracia y libertad. Por eso decid* aprovechar el uso de los s*mbolos. Quizás recuerden el cartel con el número “75” que añadimos a nuestros adornos navideños el año pasado. Gracias al gran despliegue de medios de que fue objeto este cartel, se le recordó al mundo que muchos cubanos inocentes van a parar a la cárcel sólo por diferir de Castro. Gracias a ese cartel, los habaneros también pudieron conocer que el mundo está sobrecogido por el encarcelamiento arbitrario al que Castro ha sometido a los prisioneros pol*ticos.

Con el fin de que el pueblo pudiera visualizar las condiciones infrahumanas en que estos prisioneros están confinados, mis colegas y yo utilizamos otro s*mbolo: construimos una réplica exacta de la celda cubana de castigo en la cual se encuentra encarcelado un valiente prisionero de conciencia, el Dr. Oscar El*as Biscet. También fue tema de información de los medios y en la actualidad es vista por los cientos de cubanos que a diario visitan nuestra Sección de Intereses.

¿Por qué usar tales s*mbolos? Porque los s*mbolos resultan especialmente poderosos en sociedades cerradas donde los gobiernos controlan los medios y censuran toda información.

Perm*tanme dirigirme a aquéllos que piensan que es más digno protestar contra la represión del régimen a puertas cerradas o que Castro ser*a más generoso si no lo irritáramos. En pocas palabras: a aquéllos que piensan que soy demasiado “provocador”.

¿Acaso constituye una provocación el señalar que los cubanos viven bajo uno de los reg*menes más represivos del mundo? ¿Acaso constituye una provocación el recordarle a los periodistas occidentales que en Cuba hay 300 presos pol*ticos? ¿Acaso está fuera del ámbito de una actividad diplomática normal el suministrar a los cubanos una información sin censura? ¿Acaso constituye una provocación el organizar actividades para los disidentes a favor de la democracia o para sus familiares? ¿Qué debemos hacer entonces? ¿Relegar a los cubanos al aislamiento respecto al mundo real?

Nada se conseguirá --y de hecho nada se ha conseguido en estos 47 años-- con ser corteses con un dictador. Si con quedarnos callados se obtuvieran reformas pol*ticas, nos quedar*amos callados. Si creyéramos que el levantamiento del embargo pudiera conducir a una Cuba democrática, mañana mismo tuviéramos aviones Jumbo 747 llenos de estadounidenses en las pistas.

Castro puede haber mal administrado brutalmente la econom*a de Cuba, agobiado a los cubanos con enormes deudas y dependido de los extranjeros que lo han mantenido, pero de lo que s* no cabe duda es de su control sobre su aldea Potemkin. No permitirá nada que pueda poner en peligro su total control sobre todos los aspectos de la vida cubana. Miren cómo ha evitado que los turistas “contaminen” a los cubanos y hagan que éstos deseen lo que no pueden tener. Ha puesto los enclaves tur*sticos fuera del alcance del cubano promedio y ha hecho ***plir esta segregación gracias a una intrincada red de controles. Miren también cómo todas las empresas mixtas con entidades extranjeras han llenado las arcas del régimen sin por ello haber promovido entre los cubanos la independencia financiera. Tal y como lo ilustra n*tidamente el aleccionador episodio que tuvo como protagonista al ex ministro de Relaciones Exteriores Robaina, Castro castiga sin clemencia a todo funcionario que ose proyectarse, as* sea discretamente, como un reformista incipiente.

A menudo, Castro suele representar su ira contra los Estados Unidos mediante el enfrentamiento entre un David cubano y un Goliath estadounidense. Pudiera parecer una iron*a, pero en la Sección de Intereses, nosotros somos, en realidad, el David que trata de derribar al enorme aparato represivo de Castro. Estamos confinados a los l*mites de la ciudad de La Habana. Agentes de la inteligencia cubana monitorean cada uno de nuestros movimientos y acosan a nuestros funcionarios. Los cubanos que se relacionan con nosotros están expuestos a la vigilancia y a las arbitrarias represalias del régimen.

Sin embargo, el régimen no ha logrado amedrentar a los activistas a favor de la democracia ni impedir que se reúnan con nosotros; es por ello que se empeña absurdamente en proclamar que los que lo hacen son “mercenarios” pagados por nosotros. Les ruego que tomen nota de lo siguiente: la Sección de Intereses de los Estados Unidos no ha dado y no da dinero a los miembros de la sociedad civil cubana. ¿Que algunas personas en el exterior, especialmente miembros de la comunidad cubana en el exilio, brindan ayuda financiera a los cubanos, incluyendo a los disidentes? En efecto y aplaudimos su generosidad.

También resulta cierto que recib* mi porción de frustración durante mi estancia. Se me hizo particularmente dif*cil hacer ver a los visitantes extranjeros que, detrás de la aldea Potemkin de Castro, existe un sistema totalitario despiadado y c*nico.

A los estadounidenses les resulta dif*cil entender a Cuba, ya que no tenemos que preocuparnos porque las cr*ticas que podamos hacer de nuestro gobierno o de nuestra sociedad puedan perjudicar a nuestros seres queridos. Nos es dif*cil concebir una sociedad que reglamente todos los aspectos de nuestras vidas. Y al igual que les sucede a casi todos los visitantes extranjeros, a los estadounidenses les resulta dif*cil entender la forma en que el régimen cubano se apropia prácticamente de todos los beneficios financieros provenientes de sus limitadas relaciones con el exterior.

Me llevaré de Cuba múltiples e inolvidables imágenes de la desesperación de los cubanos por abandonar su propia patria, a pesar de la belleza de la isla, del calor de su pueblo y de lo maravilloso de su música, su danza y su arte.

La más v*vida de estas imágenes es la de un individuo que se apoderó por la fuerza de un avión en un aeropuerto local. Las autoridades cubanas me pidieron que hablara con él. “Yo no creo que usted sea Cason”, me contestó el secuestrador. Me dirig* a la pista para advertirle que tendr*a que enfrentar una larga condena en los Estados Unidos si llevaba a cabo su plan. El secuestrador replicó: “prefiero pasar 20 años en una cárcel de los Estados Unidos antes que quedarme en Cuba”. Finalmente obligó al avión a despegar con rumbo a los Estados Unidos, fue arrestado tan pronto aterrizó y posteriormente fue sentenciado a 22 años de prisión. ¿Pudiera existir acusación más reveladora contra un régimen , cuando un enorme porcentaje de sus ciudadanos sueña apasionadamente con abandonar su pa*s por otro?

La grandeza de los Estados Unidos ha sido el resultado de haber atra*do a emigrantes de todas partes del mundo. Dos millones de cubanos han encontrado refugio y éxito en nuestro pa*s. Lo que resultó una pérdida para Cuba, redundó en beneficio nuestro. Piensen en lo que Cuba fuera hoy, si hubieran permanecido en la Isla el talento y la energ*a que convirtieron a Miami en lo que actualmente es.

Pero el sistema, producto de las improvisaciones de Castro, no puede durar mucho. Todo el mundo sabe cuán inoperante es y cómo se mantiene sólo por la fuerza de una figura única y dominante. Y esta figura está literalmente en las últimas. El cambio es inevitable. Yo conf*o en que el pueblo cubano no se conforme con una apertura económica parcial, sino que exija que en Cuba se opere una profunda transición democrática.

No abandonen su patria, es el consejo que doy a los cubanos. Quédense y estén listos para cuando llegue el momento en que esta figura desaparezca. Quédense y apréstense a trabajar por un cambio democrático. Cuando llegue ese momento, los Estados Unidos, al igual que otros pa*ses, estarán a su lado para ayudarlos a construir una Cuba democrática y próspera; una Cuba donde todos los cubanos puedan realizar sus sueños.

La concepción de los Estados Unidos como s*mbolo de esperanza para los inmigrantes es notoria. Queda por ver cuál será el s*mbolo que se le atribuirá a la Cuba próspera y democrática del futuro. Pero dado el dinamismo que una Cuba libre pudiera desencadenar, estoy seguro de que su s*mbolo será igualmente poderoso e incontestable.

Si pudiera dejarles una última idea a mis amigos cubanos, ésta ser*a: “cachán, cachán, que d*as mejores pronto vendrán”.

Muchas gracias


Colaboración:
http://usembassy.state.gov/havana/wwwhc070405s.html

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
"Juntarse, es la palabra de orden"
José Mart*

_______________________________________________
NetforCuba.org authorize the reproduction and distribution of this E-Mail as long as the source is credited. /
NetforCuba.org autoriza la reproduccion y redistribucion de este correo, mientras nuestra fuente (http://www.netforcuba.org) sea citada.

NetforCuba International
http://www.netforcuba.org/

Para NetforCuba en español, favor de visitar:
http://www.netforcubaenespanol.org


If you wish to be removed from our mailing list, please E-mail us at the following address: NFC@NetforCuba.org, and simply write, "Remove from list" in the subject area.
  Reply With Quote


  sponsored links


2 19th July 18:10
miguel opastel
External User
 
Posts: 1
Default Speech by U.S. Chief of Mission James C. Cason on the Occasion of the Fourth of July Celebration


(Discurso en español abajo)


Senior U.S. Official in Cuba Says Change Is Inevitable Departing Chief of Mission Cason reflects on efforts to support democracy

-Speech by U.S. Chief of Mission James C. Cason
on the Occasion of the Fourth of July Celebration


Change is inevitable in Cuba, and the United States and others will work with the Cuban people as they build a democratic and prosperous country, says James Cason, chief of mission at the U.S. Interests Section in Havana.

In his July 4 final remarks to the U.S. Interests Section before leaving his post, Cason outlined U.S. efforts to encourage a democratic, free and prosperous Cuba, focusing in particular on efforts to assist Cuban pro-democracy activists.

As part of these efforts, Cason noted, the United States has increased the amount of uncensored information available to Cubans, including books, radios, newspapers, and extensive free and uncensored Internet access. The U.S. official pointed out that the United States also engages Cubans via video-conferences on issues such as democratic transitions, rule of law, and market economies.

Within this context, however, Cason stressed that the U.S. Interests Section has not given -- and does not give -- money to members of Cuba's civil society.

Cason also defended U.S. efforts against complaints that they are overly "provocative."

He said: "Is it provocative to point out that Cubans live under one of the most repressive regimes in the world? Is it provocative to remind Western journalists of Cuba's 300 political prisoners? Is it outside the scope of normal diplomatic activity to provide uncensored information to Cubans? [Is] holding events for pro-democratic Cuban dissidents or their family members provocative? Should we instead abandon Cubans to isolation from the real world?"

Cason added that nothing has come from being polite to Cuban dictator Fidel Castro. Moreover, he indicated that if the United States thought keeping quiet or lifting the U.S. embargo on Cuba would encourage political reforms, the United States would be quiet and resume commercial ties with Cuba.

Reflecting on Cuba's future, Cason said that the Castro regime is on its last legs, and significant change is inevitable.

"I'm confident that the Cuban people will not be satisfied with a partial economic opening, but will demand that Cuba undergo a thorough democratic transition," he said.

In the meantime, Cason encouraged the Cuban people to be ready to work for democratic change, adding that they can count on continued U.S. support.

"When that time comes, the United States and others will be at your side to help you build a democratic, prosperous Cuba -- a Cuba where all Cubans can realize their dreams," he said.

Following is the text of Cason's prepared remarks:

By Scott Miller
Washington File Staff Writer

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Speech by U.S. Chief of Mission James C. Cason
on the Occasion of the Fourth of July Celebration

Havana, Cuba
July 4, 2005


Ladies and gentlemen, after almost three years in Cuba, this will be my last opportunity to address you. I'd like to share with you some reflections on my time here.

Despite my best efforts to prepare for my job in Cuba, the island took me by surprise.

I arrived under the illusion that I might be able to pragmatically engage Cuban officials on issues of mutual concern. Fidel, it appears, didn't trust his officials meeting with me. So I was assigned a MinRex [Ministry of Foreign Affairs] "handler" incapable of straying from the world according to [Cuban government newspaper] "Granma."

My initial dealings with the Cuban regime quickly brought home to me that in Cuba appearances are fundamentally deceiving. Castro's Cuba is one big Potemkin village. If you go more than three blocks behind the main tourist thoroughfares, you will see the shabbiness and decay of the real Cuba. If you reach out to average Cubans, you will understand what this place is all about. And that is precisely what the Cuban regime does not want us to do.

To better learn about the real Cuba, I traveled seven thousand miles across the island in my first six months. I met with hundreds of average Cubans. All were proud to be Cubans. All were intensely curious about the world, especially about the United States. Many asked for greater global attention to pro-democracy efforts on the island. Many others asked how they could immigrate to the United States.

I remember meeting a group of balseros [rafters] the U.S. Coast Guard had picked up at sea and returned to Cuba. One man told me that he had tried 26 times to raft illegally to the United States. He vowed to keep on trying until he got there, or the sharks ate him. You have to admire that kind of determination. I later learned that all those balseros were arrested for having met with me.

For a person who has not lived under totalitarian rule, it is hard to grasp what life is like when the State dominates all facets of society. Simply put, ****ytically understanding how a totalitarian regime functions is not the same thing as seeing people bound by its shackles. I now understand that:

-- To appreciate the sterility of the Castro regime's propaganda, one has to hear it day-in and day-out, week after deadening week.

-- To comprehend this regime's enormous wastage of human talent, one has to see how it stifles all independent initiative and freedom of expression.

-- To understand why two million Cubans have forsaken everything they cherish on the island to start new lives abroad and millions others want to join them, one needs to see the threadbare, intolerant environment that confines them.

My conversations with a wide spectrum of Cubans sharpened my own thinking about what I could accomplish in Cuba. I wanted to encourage Cubans to think about ensuring that their country will someday be democratic, free and prosperous. I also wanted to find creative new ways to help Cuban pro-democracy activists get themselves heard on the island and throughout the world.

How have we advanced these two goals in practical terms? We increased the amount of uncensored information -- in the form of books, magazines, newspapers, and radios -- we make available to Cubans. We offer Cubans extensive free, uncensored Internet access. We bring together Cubans on the island with people on the outside through videoconferences on such issues as democratic transitions, rule of law, and market economies. We provide classes on journalism for those daring enough to write about Cuba as they see it.

As you all know, in Cuba none of us are allowed to speak publicly about democracy or freedom. So I decided to use symbols to our best advantage. You may recall the big sign with the number "75" we added to our holiday decorations last year. Thanks to the extensive media coverage that "75" sign received, the world was reminded that innocent Cubans are thrown into jail for having a different point of view than Castro's. And that "75" sign also enabled Habaneros to learn that the world is appalled by Castro's arbitrary incarceration of political prisoners.

To help people visualize the inhumane conditions in which these political prisoners are confined, my colleagues and I came up with another symbol. We built an exact replica of the Cuban punishment cell that confined a courageous prisoner of conscience, Dr. Oscar Elias Biscet. It also was reported by the media, and is now seen daily by hundreds of Cuban visitors to the Interests Section.

Why use such symbols? Because symbols are especially powerful in closed societies where governments control the media and censor all information.

Let me address those who think it's more dignified to protest the Cuban regime's repression behind closed doors or who think Castro will be more generous if we don't aggravate him. In short, those who think that I'm overly "provocative."

Is it provocative to point out that Cubans live under one of the most repressive regimes in the world? Is it provocative to remind western journalists of Cuba's 300 political prisoners? Is it outside the scope of normal diplomatic activity to provide uncensored information to Cubans? Are holding events for pro-democratic Cuban dissidents or their family members provocative? Should we instead abandon Cubans to isolation from the real world?

Nothing will come -- indeed, in almost 47 years nothing has come -- from being polite to a dictator. If we thought that keeping quiet would bring about political reforms, we would be quiet. If we thought that lifting the U.S. embargo would result in a democratic Cuba, we would have 747's full of Americans on the tarmac tomorrow.

Castro may have grossly mismanaged Cuba's economy, saddled Cubans with huge debts, and become dependent on foreign sugar daddies, but never doubt his control over his Potemkin village. He will allow nothing to jeopardize his total control over all aspects of Cuban life. Look how he has sought to prevent tourists from "contaminating" Cubans to want things they cannot have. He made the tourist enclaves off limits to average Cubans, and enforced this segregation through an intricate network of controls. Look also how all business ventures with foreigners enrich the Cuban regime's coffers without promoting financial independence among Cubans. As the cautionary tale of the former Cuban Foreign Minister Roibana so vividly illustrates, Castro will ruthlessly punish any official who ever so discreetly tries to portray himself as an incipient reformer.

Castro often portrays his wrath against the United States as a battle between a Cuban David against the U.S. Goliath. You may find this ironic, but we at the Interests Section are the David trying to face down Castro's enormous repressive apparatus. We are confined to Havana. Cuban intelligence agents monitor our every move and harass our officers. Cubans who deal with us are exposed to the regime's surveillance and arbitrary reprisals.

Yet the Cuban regime has not managed to scare away pro-democratic activists from meeting with us. So it absurdly maintains that all those who meet with us are "mercenaries" in our pay. Please take note: the U.S. Interests Section has not given and does not give money to members of Cuba's civil society. Do others off the island, especially the Cuban exile community, provide financial help to average Cubans, including dissidents? Of course, and we applaud their generosity.

I've certainly had my share of frustrations during my time here. In particular, I've found it difficult getting some foreign visitors to see that behind Castro's Potemkin village is a cynical, ruthless totalitarian system.

Cuba is hard for Americans to understand because we don't have to worry that our criticism of our own government or society will bring harm to our loved ones. We have difficulty in comprehending a society that regiments all facets of our lives. And like virtually all other foreign visitors, Americans find it hard to grasp how the Cuban regime captures virtually all of the financial benefits of Cuba's limited links with the outside world.

I will leave Cuba with multiple, unforgettable images of Cubans' desperation to leave their own country, despite the island's beauty, the warmth of its people, and Cuba's marvelous music, dance and art.

The most vivid of these images is of a would-be hijacker who commandeered a plane at a local airport. I was asked by the Cuban authorities to talk to him. "I don't believe that you are Cason," the hijacker told me. So I walked out on the tarmac to warn him that he would be facing a long prison sentence in the U.S. if he went through with his plan. The hijacker replied that "I would rather go to jail for 20 years in the U.S. than stay in Cuba." He forced the plane to depart for the U.S., was arrested upon landing, and was later sentenced to 22 years in prison. Can there be a more telling indictment of a regime when such a huge percentage of its citizens passionately dream of abandoning their country for another?

America's greatness has been the result of attracting immigrants from all over the world. Two million Cubans have found refuge and success in our country. Our gain has been Cuba's loss. Think of what Cuba could have been today if all the talent and energy that went into making Miami what it is had remained in Cuba.

But Castro's jury-rigged system cannot last long -- everyone knows that it does not work and is held together by the force of one domineering personality. And that personality is literally on his last legs. Change is inevitable. I'm confident that the Cuban people will not be satisfied with a partial economic opening, but will demand that Cuba undergo a thorough democratic transition.

Don't abandon your Patria [homeland], is my advice to Cubans. Stay and be ready for when the personality withers away. Stay and be ready to work for democratic change. When that time comes, the United States and others will be at your side to help you build a democratic, prosperous Cuba -- a Cuba where all Cubans can realize their dreams.

America's symbol of promise to its immigrants is well known. What will be the symbol of the democratic, prosperous Cuba of the future remains to be seen. But given the dynamism that a free Cuba will unleash, I'm sure that its symbol will also be powerfully compelling.

If I could leave my Cuban friends with one final thought, it would be: "kachán, kachán -- d*as mejores pronto vendrán."

Thank you.


Collaboration:
http://usinfo.state.gov/dhr/Archive/2005/Jul/06-853982.html?chanlid=democracy

__________________________________________________ ___________


PALABRAS DEL JEFE DE MISION, SR. JAMES C. CASON, CON MOTIVO DE LA FIESTA NACIONAL DEL 4 DE JULIO


JULIO 4, 2005
Señoras y señores:

Después de casi tres años de permanencia en Cuba, ésta será la última oportunidad en que me dirija a ustedes. Por ello, quisiera que compartiéramos juntos algunas reflexiones fruto de mi estancia en este pa*s.

A pesar de mis mejores esfuerzos por prepararme para mi trabajo en Cuba, esta isla me tomó por sorpresa.

Llegué con la ilusión de que quizás pudiera involucrar pragmáticamente a los funcionarios cubanos en temas de interés mutuo. Como al parecer Fidel no confiaba en las reuniones entre sus funcionarios y yo, el MINREX me asignó un “negociante” incapaz de apartarse del mundo concebido según el periódico Granma.

Mis tratos iniciales con el régimen cubano me mostraron con toda claridad que en Cuba las apariencias son fundamentalmente descorazonadoras. La Cuba de Castro es una gran aldea Potemkin, es decir, una gran fachada. Si uno camina tres cuadras más allá de los principales sitios de atracción tur*stica, se encuentra con el deterioro y el aspecto lastimoso que ofrece la verdadera Cuba. Si uno extiende su mano al cubano promedio, comprende lo que existe en todas partes. Y eso es, precisamente, lo que el régimen cubano no quiere que hagamos.

Durante mis primeros seis meses de misión, viajé 7 mil millas a través de la Isla con el fin de conocer mejor la Cuba verdadera. Me reun* con cientos de cubanos comunes y corrientes. Todos se enorgullec*an de ser cubanos. Todos experimentaban una curiosidad intensa por conocer el mundo, especialmente los Estados Unidos. Muchos solicitaban una mayor atención global hacia los esfuerzos que, en pro de la democracia, se realizan en la Isla. Muchos otros preguntaban cómo podr*an emigrar a los Estados Unidos.

Recuerdo la ocasión en que me reun* con un grupo de balseros recogidos por un guardacostas estadounidense y posteriormente devueltos a Cuba. Un hombre me confesó que hab*a intentado veintiséis veces abandonar ilegalmente el pa*s en una balsa. Y prometió seguir intentándolo hasta que lo lograra o los tiburones lo devoraran. Uno no puede menos que admirar este tipo de determinación. Después supe que todos estos balseros hab*an sido arrestados por haberse reunido conmigo.

A una persona que no ha vivido bajo un gobierno totalitario, le resulta muy dif*cil captar lo que es la vida cuando el Estado domina todos los aspectos de la sociedad. Dicho de una forma más sencilla: comprender *****ticamente cómo funciona un régimen totalitario no es lo mismo que ver a las personas atadas a sus grilletes. Ahora entiendo que:

- Para poder apreciar la esterilidad de la propaganda del régimen castrista, uno tiene que o*rla d*a tras d*a, semana tras semana.

-- Para poder comprender el enorme desperdicio de talento humano que el régimen lleva a cabo, uno tiene que ver cómo asfixia toda iniciativa independiente y toda tentativa de libre expresión.

-- Para poder entender por qué dos millones de cubanos han renunciado a lo que más amaban en la Isla con tal de emprender una nueva vida y otros millones desean unirse a ellos, uno tiene que ver el entorno ra*do e intolerante en el que están confinados.

Las conversaciones que sostuve con un amplio espectro de cubanos agudizaron mis criterios sobre lo que podr*a realizar en Cuba. Quise estimular a los cubanos de manera que pudieran pensar cómo hacer para que su pa*s fuera, algún d*a, democrático, libre y próspero. También quise encontrar nuevas y creativas v*as de ayudar a que la voz de los activistas cubanos a favor de la democracia pudiera ser escuchada dentro y fuera de la Isla.

En términos prácticos: ¿en qué medida avanzamos en la consecución de estos dos objetivos? Hemos aumentado el número de información sin censura --ya sea en forma de libros, revistas, periódicos y radios— y la hemos puesto al alcance de los cubanos. Les hemos ofrecido un acceso libre y amplio a Internet. Los hemos puesto en contacto con personas residentes en el extranjero, a través de videoconferencias sobre temas tales como transiciones democráticas, estado de derecho y econom*as de mercado. Hemos brindado cursos de periodismo a aquéllos que se han atrevido a escribir sobre Cuba tal y como la ven.

Como todos ustedes saben, a ninguno de nosotros se nos permite hablar públicamente en Cuba sobre democracia y libertad. Por eso decid* aprovechar el uso de los s*mbolos. Quizás recuerden el cartel con el número “75” que añadimos a nuestros adornos navideños el año pasado. Gracias al gran despliegue de medios de que fue objeto este cartel, se le recordó al mundo que muchos cubanos inocentes van a parar a la cárcel sólo por diferir de Castro. Gracias a ese cartel, los habaneros también pudieron conocer que el mundo está sobrecogido por el encarcelamiento arbitrario al que Castro ha sometido a los prisioneros pol*ticos.

Con el fin de que el pueblo pudiera visualizar las condiciones infrahumanas en que estos prisioneros están confinados, mis colegas y yo utilizamos otro s*mbolo: construimos una réplica exacta de la celda cubana de castigo en la cual se encuentra encarcelado un valiente prisionero de conciencia, el Dr. Oscar El*as Biscet. También fue tema de información de los medios y en la actualidad es vista por los cientos de cubanos que a diario visitan nuestra Sección de Intereses.

¿Por qué usar tales s*mbolos? Porque los s*mbolos resultan especialmente poderosos en sociedades cerradas donde los gobiernos controlan los medios y censuran toda información.

Perm*tanme dirigirme a aquéllos que piensan que es más digno protestar contra la represión del régimen a puertas cerradas o que Castro ser*a más generoso si no lo irritáramos. En pocas palabras: a aquéllos que piensan que soy demasiado “provocador”.

¿Acaso constituye una provocación el señalar que los cubanos viven bajo uno de los reg*menes más represivos del mundo? ¿Acaso constituye una provocación el recordarle a los periodistas occidentales que en Cuba hay 300 presos pol*ticos? ¿Acaso está fuera del ámbito de una actividad diplomática normal el suministrar a los cubanos una información sin censura? ¿Acaso constituye una provocación el organizar actividades para los disidentes a favor de la democracia o para sus familiares? ¿Qué debemos hacer entonces? ¿Relegar a los cubanos al aislamiento respecto al mundo real?

Nada se conseguirá --y de hecho nada se ha conseguido en estos 47 años-- con ser corteses con un dictador. Si con quedarnos callados se obtuvieran reformas pol*ticas, nos quedar*amos callados. Si creyéramos que el levantamiento del embargo pudiera conducir a una Cuba democrática, mañana mismo tuviéramos aviones Jumbo 747 llenos de estadounidenses en las pistas.

Castro puede haber mal administrado brutalmente la econom*a de Cuba, agobiado a los cubanos con enormes deudas y dependido de los extranjeros que lo han mantenido, pero de lo que s* no cabe duda es de su control sobre su aldea Potemkin. No permitirá nada que pueda poner en peligro su total control sobre todos los aspectos de la vida cubana. Miren cómo ha evitado que los turistas “contaminen” a los cubanos y hagan que éstos deseen lo que no pueden tener. Ha puesto los enclaves tur*sticos fuera del alcance del cubano promedio y ha hecho ***plir esta segregación gracias a una intrincada red de controles. Miren también cómo todas las empresas mixtas con entidades extranjeras han llenado las arcas del régimen sin por ello haber promovido entre los cubanos la independencia financiera. Tal y como lo ilustra n*tidamente el aleccionador episodio que tuvo como protagonista al ex ministro de Relaciones Exteriores Robaina, Castro castiga sin clemencia a todo funcionario que ose proyectarse, as* sea discretamente, como un reformista incipiente.

A menudo, Castro suele representar su ira contra los Estados Unidos mediante el enfrentamiento entre un David cubano y un Goliath estadounidense. Pudiera parecer una iron*a, pero en la Sección de Intereses, nosotros somos, en realidad, el David que trata de derribar al enorme aparato represivo de Castro. Estamos confinados a los l*mites de la ciudad de La Habana. Agentes de la inteligencia cubana monitorean cada uno de nuestros movimientos y acosan a nuestros funcionarios. Los cubanos que se relacionan con nosotros están expuestos a la vigilancia y a las arbitrarias represalias del régimen.

Sin embargo, el régimen no ha logrado amedrentar a los activistas a favor de la democracia ni impedir que se reúnan con nosotros; es por ello que se empeña absurdamente en proclamar que los que lo hacen son “mercenarios” pagados por nosotros. Les ruego que tomen nota de lo siguiente: la Sección de Intereses de los Estados Unidos no ha dado y no da dinero a los miembros de la sociedad civil cubana. ¿Que algunas personas en el exterior, especialmente miembros de la comunidad cubana en el exilio, brindan ayuda financiera a los cubanos, incluyendo a los disidentes? En efecto y aplaudimos su generosidad.

También resulta cierto que recib* mi porción de frustración durante mi estancia. Se me hizo particularmente dif*cil hacer ver a los visitantes extranjeros que, detrás de la aldea Potemkin de Castro, existe un sistema totalitario despiadado y c*nico.

A los estadounidenses les resulta dif*cil entender a Cuba, ya que no tenemos que preocuparnos porque las cr*ticas que podamos hacer de nuestro gobierno o de nuestra sociedad puedan perjudicar a nuestros seres queridos. Nos es dif*cil concebir una sociedad que reglamente todos los aspectos de nuestras vidas. Y al igual que les sucede a casi todos los visitantes extranjeros, a los estadounidenses les resulta dif*cil entender la forma en que el régimen cubano se apropia prácticamente de todos los beneficios financieros provenientes de sus limitadas relaciones con el exterior.

Me llevaré de Cuba múltiples e inolvidables imágenes de la desesperación de los cubanos por abandonar su propia patria, a pesar de la belleza de la isla, del calor de su pueblo y de lo maravilloso de su música, su danza y su arte.

La más v*vida de estas imágenes es la de un individuo que se apoderó por la fuerza de un avión en un aeropuerto local. Las autoridades cubanas me pidieron que hablara con él. “Yo no creo que usted sea Cason”, me contestó el secuestrador. Me dirig* a la pista para advertirle que tendr*a que enfrentar una larga condena en los Estados Unidos si llevaba a cabo su plan. El secuestrador replicó: “prefiero pasar 20 años en una cárcel de los Estados Unidos antes que quedarme en Cuba”. Finalmente obligó al avión a despegar con rumbo a los Estados Unidos, fue arrestado tan pronto aterrizó y posteriormente fue sentenciado a 22 años de prisión. ¿Pudiera existir acusación más reveladora contra un régimen , cuando un enorme porcentaje de sus ciudadanos sueña apasionadamente con abandonar su pa*s por otro?

La grandeza de los Estados Unidos ha sido el resultado de haber atra*do a emigrantes de todas partes del mundo. Dos millones de cubanos han encontrado refugio y éxito en nuestro pa*s. Lo que resultó una pérdida para Cuba, redundó en beneficio nuestro. Piensen en lo que Cuba fuera hoy, si hubieran permanecido en la Isla el talento y la energ*a que convirtieron a Miami en lo que actualmente es.

Pero el sistema, producto de las improvisaciones de Castro, no puede durar mucho. Todo el mundo sabe cuán inoperante es y cómo se mantiene sólo por la fuerza de una figura única y dominante. Y esta figura está literalmente en las últimas. El cambio es inevitable. Yo conf*o en que el pueblo cubano no se conforme con una apertura económica parcial, sino que exija que en Cuba se opere una profunda transición democrática.

No abandonen su patria, es el consejo que doy a los cubanos. Quédense y estén listos para cuando llegue el momento en que esta figura desaparezca. Quédense y apréstense a trabajar por un cambio democrático. Cuando llegue ese momento, los Estados Unidos, al igual que otros pa*ses, estarán a su lado para ayudarlos a construir una Cuba democrática y próspera; una Cuba donde todos los cubanos puedan realizar sus sueños.

La concepción de los Estados Unidos como s*mbolo de esperanza para los inmigrantes es notoria. Queda por ver cuál será el s*mbolo que se le atribuirá a la Cuba próspera y democrática del futuro. Pero dado el dinamismo que una Cuba libre pudiera desencadenar, estoy seguro de que su s*mbolo será igualmente poderoso e incontestable.

Si pudiera dejarles una última idea a mis amigos cubanos, ésta ser*a: “cachán, cachán, que d*as mejores pronto vendrán”.

Muchas gracias


Colaboración:
http://usembassy.state.gov/havana/wwwhc070405s.html

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
"Juntarse, es la palabra de orden"
José Mart*

_______________________________________________
NetforCuba.org authorize the reproduction and distribution of this E-Mail as long as the source is credited. /
NetforCuba.org autoriza la reproduccion y redistribucion de este correo, mientras nuestra fuente (http://www.netforcuba.org) sea citada.

NetforCuba International
http://www.netforcuba.org/

Para NetforCuba en español, favor de visitar:
http://www.netforcubaenespanol.org


If you wish to be removed from our mailing list, please E-mail us at the following address: NFC@NetforCuba.org, and simply write, "Remove from list" in the subject area.

This mother****er is one of the most evil criminals in the world.
M
  Reply With Quote
3 19th July 18:11
pm
External User
 
Posts: 1
Default Todo el mal que hacemos tarde o temprano vuelve contra nosotros. O SINO PREGUNTEN A CEAUCESCU EN EL INFIERNO...QUE LE PASO...?


Todo el mal que hacemos tarde o temprano vuelve contra nosotros.
O SINO PREGUNTEN A LOS CEAUCESCUS EN EL INFIERNO...QUE LES PASO...?

O ...A BENITIN MUSSOLINI ? http://remember.org/camps/


Hace cuarenta y seis años cometimos el olvido de Cuba, la dejamos desangrar y el dolor de sus prisioneros nos fue casi indiferente.

Desde entonces vimos por los noticieros los intentos de escape de sus habitantes como una curiosidad por los medios empleados en la desesperación del que busca ser libre.
Recién reaccionamos ante las atrocidades de Castro y su asesino principal , el Che Guevara, cuando trataron de imponernos su sangrienta ideolog*a, pero all* nos quedamos defendiendo nuestra tierra sin darnos cuenta que Cuba también era "nuestra tierra".
All*, entre el olvido y la indiferencia, nuestro ego*smo fue el mal que hoy vuelve asolando nuestra Argentina.
Convertidos en refugio de terroristas internacionales, con una Corte Suprema que los protege bajo aberrantes fallos, con soldados perseguidos y encarcelados por haber derrotado la subversión, con un gobierno que se abraza a Castro y Chávez, Argentina es hoy un presente que nos castiga por el mal que hemos cometido.
Cuando le dimos la espalda a los cubanos que luchaban por su libertad le dimos la espalda a nuestra propia libertad.
Tal vez aprendamos que la lucha por la Libertad de cualquier pueblo es nuestra lucha.
Cuando nos olvidamos de Cuba nos olvidamos de nosotros.

DARIO
-
As Abraham Lincoln (one of America's greatest and most quoted Presidents)
said, "I know that the Lord is always on the side of the right. But it is my
constant anxiety and prayer that I and this nation should be on the Lord's
side."
  Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools
Display Modes




Copyright 2006 SmartyDevil.com - Dies Mies Jeschet Boenedoesef Douvema Enitemaus -
666