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1 7th September 02:34
david w.e. roberts
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Default More berries mean a hard winter - old wives tale? (old winter have plum watch)


Hi,

there is a theory that extra berries on the shrubs means a hard winter and
nature is taking care of all the birds etc.

This sounds doubtful if subjected to logical ****ysis anyway - my 2p theory
is that more berries means a good summer, and good summers (lots of high
pressure and clear skies) are often followed by hard winters (lots of high
pressure and clear skies).

Be that as it may:

we had loads of berries on the shrubs last year - after a wonderful summer.

There are still loads of berries on the shrub by our steps (cotoneaster
springs to mind, but that may be the other one).
I need to prune this back because it is invading the area of the steps and I
do like to go down into the garden :-)
However it is still loaded with red berries, and pruning back will invlove
throwing away most of these berries.

So; are the birds still dependant on last years berries, or will this years
growth be feeding them? I know the pigeons are doing well off the buds on
our plum trees.

As a first stage I have cleared the top layer of growth, exposing the
berries underneath.
I will watch for a bit in case the birds start stripping these, but I
suspect that nature has over provided in this case.

Obviously I don't want to remove a valuable resource for the wild life, but
how long do they depend on last years berries?

TIA
Dave R
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2 7th September 02:34
oxymel_of_squill
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Default More berries mean a hard winter - old wives tale? (old winter have)


more likely shrub trying to increase its chances of propagating I should
have thought
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3 7th September 02:34
martin sykes
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Default More berries mean a hard winter - old wives tale? (old winter)


Or the cold weather has killed the birds so the berries don't get eaten...

--
Martin & Anna Sykes
martins.garden@sykesm.xglobalnetx.co.uk ( Remove x's when replying )
<http://www.users.globalnet.co.uk/~sykesm>
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4 7th September 02:34
robert
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Default More berries mean a hard winter - old wives tale? (old winter have)


::
:: there is a theory that extra berries on the shrubs means a hard
:: winter and nature is taking care of all the birds etc.
:
: more likely shrub trying to increase its chances of propagating I
: should have thought

And even though it's a quaint idea.... shrubs haven't got any better
forecasters than the met office, or a crystal ball
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5 7th September 02:34
kay easton
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Default More berries mean a hard winter - old wives tale? (old winter have viburnum)


In article <c4jt1n$2hd5ia$1@ID-122774.news.uni-berlin.de>, David W.E.
Roberts <nospam@talk21.com> writes


otoh - we're now in the breeding season and food requirements are high
otoh - fruit feeders have other sources, such as nectar from nipping off
buds, and oozing sap from wounds in trees.

You could always provide substitutes - raisins and sultanas (blackbirds
and starlings appear fond of these), and the last of your stored apples
which are beginning to go off.

It won't be many more weeks before we're back in the fruit season with
the first of the strawberries.

IME cotonoeaster and viburnum are a last resort - which is why you still
have berries on them now!
--
Kay Easton

Edward's earthworm page:
http://www.scarboro.demon.co.uk/edward/index.htm
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6 7th September 22:26
bella
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Posts: 1
Default More berries mean a hard winter - old wives tale? (old winter live)


Or else it's all relative... a nice summer always seems to be followed by a
horrible winter... but then, I despise winter in all its forms: mild or
harsh... they're all cold and miserable. (so why the hell do I choose to
live in Winnipeg?!)
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7 9th September 02:47
roy bailey
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Default More berries mean a hard winter - old wives tale? (old winter have large sycamore)


In article <c4jt1n$2hd5ia$1@ID-122774.news.uni-berlin.de>, David W.E. Roberts
<nospam@talk21.com> writes


I think that is the reason.

We have three large sycamore trees adjoining the garden and I have never seen so
many of their germinating seeds before. They are everywhere - growing on the
lawn, in the orchard, on the gravel drive, even lodged in the frame of the
trailer. I'm going to have to spend a lot of time pulling them up during the
next few months.
--
Roy Bailey
West Berkshire.
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8 9th September 02:47
malcolm
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Default More berries mean a hard winter - old wives tale? (old winter have autumn flowers)


In article <c4jt1n$2hd5ia$1@ID-122774.news.uni-berlin.de>, David W.E.
Roberts <nospam@talk21.com> writes

"Old wives tale" is correct :-)


Lots of berries at the end of a summer means that in the previous
summer/autumn, the plant was able to lay down good reserves of energy
with which to produce masses of flowers and then fruit the following
year.

In the UK at least, there is no correlation between good summers and
succeeding, or preceding, hard winters. Indeed, we don't seem to get
hard winters any more!


Some birds switch to buds in the spring because they are very nutritious
when growing. Other birds may still feed on berries, but these may have
lost some of their food value through the winter and so be less
attractive.

That all depends on what other food sources are available.

--
Malcolm
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9 20th September 02:32
kay easton
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Posts: 1
Default More berries mean a hard winter - old wives tale? (old winter cherry have laurel)


In article <99ZBZNAxztdAFwms@westberks.demon.co.uk>, Roy Bailey
<news@westberks.demon.co.uk> writes


I have a similar glut, but mine is of cherry laurel.

--
Kay Easton

Edward's earthworm page:
http://www.scarboro.demon.co.uk/edward/index.htm
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10 20th September 02:32
jaques dalltrades
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Posts: 1
Default More berries mean a hard winter - old wives tale? (old winter)


The message <WabQGnBbZ7dAFwBU@indaal.demon.co.uk>
from Malcolm <Malcolm@indaal.demon.co.uk> contains these words:

Much more likely that late frosts in the spring didn't kill a lot of the
blooms or retard activity of pollinating insects.

You will always find a correlation of some sort if you look hard enough.

--
Rusty
Open the creaking gate to make a horrid.squeak, then lower the foobar.
http://www.users.zetnet.co.uk/hi-fi/
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