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1 5th May 19:28
catealley
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Posts: 1
Default Hydrangea & Montauk Daisy (have split)


I have 2 questions -

How come my hydrangea has not bloomed? I bought it 3 years ago - of
course it was in bloom then - hasn't bloomed since.

Can I and if so when can I split my Montauk Daisy?

Thanks,

Cate
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2 5th May 19:28
travis
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Posts: 1
Default Hydrangea & Montauk Daisy


Have you pruned your hydrangea?

I don't know anything about the daisy.

--

Travis in Shoreline (just North of Seattle) Washington
USDA Zone 8b
Sunset Zone 5
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3 5th May 19:29
stephen henning
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Posts: 1
Default Hydrangea & Montauk Daisy (bush northern old winter rose)


Do you cut it back every winter? If so you are cutting off the
following years flowers. It blooms on old wood.

This means that if the stems get killed to the ground over the winter
(which is usually the case in northern areas) the plant will not bloom
that season. It will send up new stems which look good but will not
flower. Next winter you might consider treating the plant like a rose
bush and cover it after it goes dormant to protect the old stems which
should result in flowers for next season.
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Cheers, Steve Henning in Reading, PA USA Zone 6
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4 6th May 04:51
cheryl isaak
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Posts: 1
Default Hydrangea & Montauk Daisy (have)


On 4/5/05 7:31 PM, in article
1112743884.179082.235010@l41g2000cwc.googlegroups. com, "catealley@aol.com"

No idea on the hydrangea, but the Montauk Daisy, IF it what I know as
Montauk Daisy, you should be able to lift and divide as the ground is
workable.

And no - I have no clue what the Latin is, was or will be. It is a "pass
along plant" locally.

Cheryl
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5 6th May 04:52
yippie
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Posts: 1
Default Hydrangea & Montauk Daisy


There's a whole lot of gardening subjects you are proving to be
clueless on! Which probably means you call yourself a gardener or a
landscaper!
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6 6th May 04:52
newt
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Posts: 1
Default Hydrangea & Montauk Daisy


Hi Cate,

Here's a site that will help you id your hydrangea and how and if t
prune.
http://tinyurl.com/57pvm

You can divide your Montauk daisy now since it blooms in late summer t
fall.
http://tinyurl.com/3sg3t

New

--
Newt
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7 6th May 04:53
travis
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Posts: 1
Default Hydrangea & Montauk Daisy


........and the examples are?

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Travis in Shoreline (just North of Seattle) Washington
USDA Zone 8b
Sunset Zone 5
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8 6th May 04:54
stephen henning
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Posts: 1
Default Hydrangea & Montauk Daisy


Don't feed the Troll!

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Cheers, Steve Henning in Reading, PA USA
http://home.earthlink.net/~rhodyman
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9 8th May 00:48
nmm1
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Posts: 1
Default Hydrangea & Montauk Daisy (bush northern old winter rose)


In article <pighash-648786.23340605042005@news.isp.giganews.com>,
Stephen Henning <pighash@aol.com> writes:


|> > How come my hydrangea has not bloomed? I bought it 3 years ago - of
|> > course it was in bloom then - hasn't bloomed since.
|>
|> Do you cut it back every winter? If so you are cutting off the
|> following years flowers. It blooms on old wood.
|>
|> This means that if the stems get killed to the ground over the winter
|> (which is usually the case in northern areas) the plant will not bloom
|> that season. It will send up new stems which look good but will not
|> flower. Next winter you might consider treating the plant like a rose
|> bush and cover it after it goes dormant to protect the old stems which
|> should result in flowers for next season.

Generally, hydrangeas are more tender than roses - they also don't
like dry conditions. Covering plants doesn't do more than minimal
protection, even in places with high diurnal variations.


Regards,
Nick Maclaren.
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