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1 9th June 06:18
newsgroup_reader
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Posts: 1
Default Sheet Lead - Pond (have water fish living)


I have a circa 1940 gardening book with instructions for creating a pool
from sheet lead.

The abutting sheets are to be crimped at 90 degrees, one with 2 inches
overhang, the other with 1 inch. The longer is folded over the shorter,
then both are bent over and soldered along the seam. The pieces are
joined together in that manner into larger sections representing bottom
and sides, which are crimped together and soldered.

Can sheet-lead still be purchased? Would the lead surface oxidize over
time, as in pipes? The book says this will not harm fish, so I assume
either they're are lying, they never tried it, or some sort of patina
develops to prevent lead leaching into the water.

The book says copper can be substituted for lead, but from what I've
read this would also unhealthy for the creatures living in it.

What are your thoughts?
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2 9th June 11:55
doug kanter
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Posts: 1
Default Sheet Lead - Pond (black leather yellow rubber pond)


I don't know if the dangers of lead were known in the 1940s, but who cares?
Why bother with it?

Go find your yellow pages phone book, check under garden centers, and find a
place that sells rubber pond liner. I say "rubber", but it may, in fact, be
a combination of other things. Whatever. It's a black material about as
thick as shoe leather, sold from a roll in the store. Much tougher than
leather, but easy to work with. My ex-wife's pond has been in place for 10
years, with no leaks, and the liner takes a beating. If you need a product
that's wider than what's sold from a roll, do a web search for flexible pond
liner. You'll find the right thing.
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3 9th June 11:55
dps
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Default Sheet Lead - Pond (water rubber ponds)


The rubber (plastic) liners can be glued together to form the complex
shapes required in ponds. Much safer than lead, particularly where the
water may be on the acid side.
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4 9th June 11:56
frank logullo
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Posts: 1
Default Sheet Lead - Pond (ponds)


Don't know about ponds but lead pans (under shower tiles) were replaced
years ago by plastic.
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5 9th June 11:56
janet baraclough
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Default Sheet Lead - Pond (old climbing)


The message <d3jlh402g44@enews4.newsguy.com>
from newsgroup_reader <newsgroup_reader@invalid_domain.us> contains
these words:

Here, yes, but it's hugely expensive. So valuable that thieves risk
their lives climbing on old roofs to rip off the lead and sell it for
scrap.

That's also available, but even more expensive.

There are much cheaper, less toxic modern liners available which are
far easier to work with. Lead sheet comes on a roll and is very, very
heavy to handle. You'd get it from building/roofing suppliers.


Janet (Scotland)
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6 9th June 17:49
snooze
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Posts: 1
Default Sheet Lead - Pond (water ponds)


I've added rec.ponds to this, there are plenty of knowledgable people there
who probably know far more then I. I can't imagine that a pond made out of
lead sheets would be safe. Keep in mind that most building codes, atleast
those in america, ban the use of lead based solder in residential plumbing.

An entire pond made out of lead or copper is going to build up a fairly high
level of heavy metals in the water. I suppose you could build the pond shape
out of lead/copper, then line it with a pond liner.

-S
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7 9th June 17:49
canadiancowboy
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Posts: 1
Default Sheet Lead - Pond (fish)


I am assuming a book from 1940 suggests lead or copper because it can be
easily shaped and is very durable. With today's technology and hard
stretchable rubbers and plastics you only need to use liners of varying
types. It is much less expensive and safer for the fish and yourselves.
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8 9th June 17:49
derek broughton
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Posts: 1
Default Sheet Lead - Pond (have dragon fish)


I can't say I've ever heard of fish being subject to those kinds of lead
levels, but fish are generally not affected by lead. It's a nerve toxin,
and fish have much simpler nervous systems than we do. However, I just
shudder to think what legal ramifications there might be for you (and
possibly even health problems). It sounds chancy.

Copper is _definitely_ not a good idea. You'd not have any snails, dragon
fly larvae, hellgramites (OK, you don't really need those!) or other
invertebrates.
--
derek
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9 9th June 23:55
stephen henning
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Posts: 1
Default Sheet Lead - Pond (buy have water fish lily)


It would be OK if you didn't eat your pond fish. With acid rain, lead
carbonate is a common product in lead lined ponds. Lead carbonate is
not soluble in water. However, ponds high in nitrates would have lead
nitrate. That is soluble and dangerous. All the anacharis I buy has
lead weight strips wrapped around it. Just don't eat the fish.
--
Pardon my spam deterrent; send email to rhodyman@earthlink.net
18,000 gallon (17'x 47'x 2-4') lily pond garden in Zone 6
Cheers, Steve Henning in Reading, PA USA
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10 9th June 23:55
stephen henning
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Posts: 1
Default Sheet Lead - Pond (buy have water fish lily)


It would be OK if you didn't eat your pond fish. With acid rain, lead
carbonate is a common product in lead lined ponds. Lead carbonate is
not soluble in water. However, ponds high in nitrates would have lead
nitrate. That is soluble and dangerous. All the anacharis I buy has
lead weight strips wrapped around it. Just don't eat the fish.
--
Pardon my spam deterrent; send email to rhodyman@earthlink.net
18,000 gallon (17'x 47'x 2-4') lily pond garden in Zone 6
Cheers, Steve Henning in Reading, PA USA
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