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1 16th October 20:31
kumar
External User
 
Posts: 1
Default Insulin Resistance/Fats related?


Hello,

"Insulin
When you eat a candy bar or a meal, the presence of glucose, amino
acids or fatty acids in the intestine stimulates the pancreas to
secrete a hormone called insulin. Insulin acts on many cells in your
body, especially those in the liver, muscle and fat tissue. Insulin
tells the cells to do the following:
Absorb glucose, fatty acids and amino acids
Stop breaking down:
glucose, fatty acids and amino acids
glycogen into glucose
fats into fatty acids and glycerol
proteins into amino acids
Start building:
glycogen from glucose
fats (triglycerides) from glycerol and fatty acids
proteins from amino acids

How Fat is Stored in Your Body

Chylomicrons do not last long in the bloodstream -- only about eight
minutes -- because enzymes called lipoprotein lipases break the fats
into fatty acids. Lipoprotein lipases are found in the walls of blood
vessels in fat tissue, muscle tissue and heart muscle. The activity of
lipoprotein lipases depends upon the levels of insulin in the body. If
insulin is high, then the lipases are highly active; if insulin is low,
the lipases are inactive.The fatty acids are then absorbed from the
blood into fat cells, muscle cells and liver cells. In these cells,
under stimulation by insulin, fatty acids are made into fat molecules
and stored as fat droplets.It is also possible for fat cells to take up
glucose and amino acids, which have been absorbed into the bloodstream
after a meal, and convert those into fat molecules....Given a choice, a
fat cell will grab the fat and store it rather than the carbohydrates
because fat is so much easier to store.

http://home.howstuffworks.com/fat-cell3.htm "

In a normal person, a small amount of insulin is produced after eating
("postprandial"), and it signals the body to absorb the sugars from the
food at a steady rate. In an "insulin resistant" person the message
does not get to the cells so the sugar remains in the blood for long
periods of time while ever more insulin is released in an attempt to
trigger the sugar-uptake. The sugar circulates in the blood for several
hours and then is taken into the cells very rapidly, leading to a steep
drop in blood sugar and a hypoglycaemic reaction several hours after
the meal.

At a later stage, frank hyperglycemia develops as pancreatic -cells
are unable to produce adequate insulin to maintain normal blood sugar
levels ("euglycemia").

Various disease states make the body tissues more resistant to the
actions of insulin. Example include infection (TNFa) and acidosis.
Recent research involves the relative roles of adipokines (the
cytokines produced by adipose tissue) in modifying insulin resistance.
Insulin resistance and atherosclerosis often appear together.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Insulin_resistance "

In consideration of above quotes, I have following questions:-

1. Can insulin resistance be treated as an inflamatory disease?

2. Can't glucose conversion into fats also happen in other cells than
fat cells?

3. Whether more insulin--natural or medicated can promote more fat
store into cells which may ultimate result into insulin resistance?

4. Whether insulin is required for entry of glucose into fat(not muscle
cells) cells?

5. Whether elevated glucose level is needed to correct inflammatory
conditions?

6. Whether immune cells or their multiplications or inflammatory
responses, need glucose as energy source in case of any
inflammation/infection and whether insulin is needed for pursuing such
responces?

Best wishes.
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2 16th October 20:32
kumar
External User
 
Posts: 1
Default Insulin Resistance/Fats related?


"Various disease states make the body tissues more resistant to the
actions of insulin. Example include infection (TNFa) and acidosis.
Recent research involves the relative roles of adipokines (the
cytokines produced by adipose tissue) in modifying insulin resistance.


Causes of insulin resistance
Obesity
Haemochromatosis
Polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS)
Hypercortisolism (e.g. steroid use or Cushing's disease)
Drugs (e.g. rifampicin, isoniazid, olanzapine, risperidone,
progestogens, many antiretrovirals, possibly alcohol)
Genes
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Insulin_resistance "


Whether above quote tells all possible causes for getting insulin
resistance or not? If not, what are other possibilities?
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