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1 13th May 22:11
james mcdone
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Posts: 1
Default Is RespirTea any good (asthma)


Did anyone tried RespirTea for their asthma? I was reading about it on the
net and is sounds good, better then taking inhalers.

James
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2 13th May 22:11
aroberts
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Posts: 1
Default Is RespirTea any good (asthma)


No, it is not better than inhalers for asthma.
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3 13th May 22:11
richard friedel
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Posts: 1
Default Is RespirTea any good (asthma exercise)


Yes, (assuming the tea is something like European ivy extract) more or
less all of the vast number of asthma docs and asthma researchers would
agree with you. Their basic argument is that asthma is an idiopathic
lung tissue disease, i. e. not caused or modulated by external factors
like breathing. If as is good scientific thinking you assume that
asthma is not idiopathic, then things make more sense, although there
is no neat scientific proof or discovery.

Leaving out the idiopathic lung disease stuff, treatment with inhalers
(airway dilating substances or steroids) would be chiefly considered in
the context of the existing reflex system of airway control and apart
from toxic effects in the body generally, rebound would be a cause of
concern. It would be questionable to push or zap some elements of a
complex control system into an apparently better condition without
understanding the control input factors. Just think of messing around
with a computer program without studying its source code.

Things speaking against the idiopathic lung disease theory or (to use
that sinister word) "agenda" are:
a) The fact that experimentally sled dogs get asthma with heavy and
presumably unnatural exercise. This is most probably due to
dysfunctional breathing in freezing air, not unmasking latent asthma.
If 70% plus of top cross country skiers have an asthma diagnosis, then
can this really be discovering latent asthma, even if the diagnoses are
bona fide, which seems unlikely? Why should asthma with long episodes
of unnatural breathlessness and possibly attacks not damage lung
tissue?
b) Reflux disease (GERD) is now implicated as a cause of asthma, so
that in this case - as well - the asthma is not idiopathic.

Since inhalers cause reflux, refraining from their use might be a step
forward, but a good understanding with a medical doctor would be
necessary.
On skiing asthma: see ,,The authors believe that their observations
[on sled dogs] provide additional support for the contention that
repeated, deep, rapid breathing with cold air can injure peripheral
airways. Consequently, the airway disease identified in this population
of racing sled dogs makes them potentially a very useful model for "ski
asthma."
(http://www.scienceblog.com/community/older/2002/G/20021018.html) IMHO
it is not ,,very useful" to accept as gospel everything the
"asthma professionals" say either
I'd guess that synchronized breathing (like qigong) to get the
tendency to insidiously hyperventilate with a vicious circle effect or
the Dr. Hahn treatment often recommended on this group (see
http://www.asthmastory.com/).would be good options. Regards, Richard
Friedel.
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4 13th May 22:12
richard friedel
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Posts: 1
Default Is RespirTea any good (asthma exercise)


Yes, more or less all of the vast number of asthma docs and asthma
researchers would agree with you. Their basic argument is that asthma
is an idiopathic lung tissue disease, i. e. not caused or modulated by
external factors like breathing. If as is good scientific thinking
you assume that asthma is not idiopathic, then things make more sense,
although there is no neat scientific proof or discovery.

Leaving out the idiopathic lung disease stuff, treatment with inhalers
(airway dilating substances or steroids) would be chiefly considered in
the context of the existing reflex system of airway control and apart
from toxic effects in the body generally, rebound would be a cause of
concern. It would be questionable to push or zap some elements of a
complex control system into an apparently better condition without
understanding the control input factors. Just think of messing around
with a computer program without studying its source code.

Things speaking against the idiopathic lung disease theory or (to use
that sinister word) "agenda" are:
a) The fact that experimentally sled dogs get asthma with heavy and
presumably unnatural exercise. This is most probably due to
dysfunctional breathing in freezing air, not unmasking latent asthma.
If 70% plus of top cross country skiers have an asthma diagnosis, then
can this really be discovering latent asthma, even if the diagnoses are
bona fide, which seems unlikely? Why should asthma with long episodes
of unnatural breathlessness and possibly attacks not damage lung
tissue?
b) Reflux disease (GERD) is now implicated as a cause of asthma, so
that in this case - as well - the asthma is not idiopathic.

Since inhalers cause reflux, refraining from their use might be a step
forward, but a good understanding with a medical doctor would be
necessary.
On skiing asthma: see ,,The authors believe that their observations
[on sled dogs] provide additional support for the contention that
repeated, deep, rapid breathing with cold air can injure peripheral
airways. Consequently, the airway disease identified in this population
of racing sled dogs makes them potentially a very useful model for "ski
asthma."
(http://www.scienceblog.com/community/older/2002/G/20021018.html) IMHO
it is not ,,very useful" to accept as gospel everything the
"asthma professionals" say either
I'd guess that synchronized breathing (like qigong) to get the
tendency to insidiously hyperventilate with a vicious circle effect or
the Dr. Hahn treatment often recommended on this group (see
http://www.asthmastory.com/).would be good options. Regards, Richard
Friedel.
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5 13th May 22:12
External User
 
Posts: 1
Default Is RespirTea any good (asthma albuterol)


Ever since I' ve been diagnosed folks who want to be helpful have been
trying to turn me on to their asthma cures. Almost without exception
the cures have been no good.

Last week Jimmy brought me some woolong tea from Chinatown. This is
real tea, not herbal, and it's cheap.

I couldn' believe it. Just a few sips and it was like getting albuterol
for the first time!

I've used it a few afternoons subsequently, and of course the law of
diminishing returns has kicked in. But it's still very noticeably
effective.

That doesn' mean I've stopped albuterol, which is much more
convienient.---Jack
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6 13th May 22:13
richard friedel
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Posts: 1
Default Is RespirTea any good (asthmatic heart throat tongue)


Jack,
How about considering respiratory sinus arrhythmia and carotid
baroreflex control of heart rate?
The carotid sinus region of the neck has, putting it crudely, a
pressure-sensitive (baroreflex) sensor causing, it seems, the
acceleration of the heart rate during an inhale, because of suction.
Checking this out by breathing with a definite degree of airflow
resistance in the nose (producing suction in the throat) and
concentrating on heart rate at the same time may correct a fault in
asthmatic breathing. Laying the tip of the tongue against the gum
behind the front teeth is a well known trick for increasing resistance.
It only seems to be a question of patient practice at a slow breathing
rate. I guess a sort of gutty feeling during an inhale, as well as
thinking about what is happening in the throat, is also involved.
See
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=10999237&dopt=Abstract
Regards, Richard Friedel
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7 13th May 22:13
richard friedel
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Posts: 1
Default Is RespirTea any good


Sorry link was truncated, should be
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db
=PubMed&list_uids=10999237&dopt=Abstract
The two halves must be put together. RF
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8 13th May 22:13
richard friedel
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Posts: 1
Default Is RespirTea any good


Sorry, here are the two parts of the link again.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db

=PubMed&list_uids=10999237&dopt=Abstract
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