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1 28th May 15:09
abc
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Posts: 1
Default Jason Winters tea-- Any success ? (cancer breast cancer chemotherapy)


My relative just got confirmed to have breast cancer. She had the
breast removed and will now go on to chemotherapy.

She has been referred to Jason Winters tea. Is this a genuine cure or
at least helpful supplement? Does anyone have experience on the
success of the tea--Herbalene, red clover and chaparral.

thanks

ABC
Please do not reply by email.Reply to NG


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2 28th May 15:09
j
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Posts: 1
Default Jason Winters tea-- Any success ?


http://www.cancersupporters.com/asc/part1.html
See "cancer fighting foods" for more.
Green and Black Tea - Long heralded for their health benefits, black and
green tea are teeming with antioxidants known as polyphenols, the most
potent called catechin. Whether you drink them cold or hot, green and
black tea can help you fight cancer. []
I like Earl Grey (Gray?) if that's green tea you're referring to.

None of those will "cure" cancer.

Hun, I was just trying to help someone on another newsgroup who mixed
medications with supplements and had a wild reaction. As soon as people
hear the word "cancer", "everyone and their cousin" is going to make
suggestions. It helps them feel less powerless or helps them with
whatever they have wrong with them.

Do her a favour and buy her Dr. Susan Love's book
http://www.susanlovemd.com/
It might be on e-bay
J-alt.support.cancer
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3 28th May 15:09
martin howard
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Posts: 1
Default Jason Winters tea-- Any success ? (cancer)


I know about Red Clover and Chaparral being anti-cancer herbs.

But the tea that has most cancer research behind it is probably Essiac. See
details in "Options" and also in the web site of the Clouds Trust which is
putting on an "Essiac & the Electro-Therapies' Workshop and Contact Day"
this weekend at The Village Hall, Elsted, West Sus***. Bit too far for you
in the USA I suppose!

Web site is http://www.cloudstrust.org and e-mail info@cloudstrust.org
Unfortunately I cannot attend due to Quaker Meeting engagements which my
wife and I cannot miss. Pity, as I have the Essiac herbal mixture but wish
to know the method of boiling it up and mixing it afterwards. It isn't just
straight forward.

--
Martin Howard
Webbs Cottage Pottery
Woolpits Road, Great Saling
BRAINTREE, Es*** CM7 5DZ
01371 850 423
martin@webbscottage.co.uk
http://www.webbscottage.co.uk
Updated 20th October 2003
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4 28th May 15:09
j
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Posts: 1
Default Jason Winters tea-- Any success ?


http://www.nci.nih.gov/cancerinfo/pdq/cam/essiac
Because no study of the use of Essiac or Flor•Essence in humans has been
reported in a peer-reviewed, scientific journal, no level of evidence ****ysis
is possible for these mixtures. The data that are available, however, do not
support claims that Essiac and Flor•Essence can detoxify the body, strengthen
the immune system, or fight cancer. At this time, the use of either Essiac or
Flor•Essence in the treatment of cancer patients cannot be recommended outside
the context of well-designed clinical trials.(07/23/2003)

Ignore Martin please.
His PSA has been rising (and/or is very high).
He know not what he doeth to himself.
J - alt.support.cancer
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5 28th May 15:09
j
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Posts: 1
Default Jason Winters tea-- Any success ? (tumor osteoporosis)


Seems to be estrogenic?
http://www.ucop.edu/srphome/bcrp/progressreport/abstracts/preven/7IB-0003.html
The eight individual herbs have estrogenic, cytotoxic (cell killing),
anti-tumor, anti-mutagenic, anti-oxidant, and anti-inflammatory properties,
among others.

This says supposed to take anti-estrogenic?
http://www.hormonerefractorypca.org/secondlineht.htm
Anti-estrogens, in the form of tamoxifen 200mg/m2 did show some PSA response.
A newer drug, raloxifene or Evista, may have a much greater effect and is
currently in a phase II clinical trial at the Cedars-Sinai Prostate Cancer
Center. it is already FDA-approved for treating osteoporosis in women. It
targets the estrogen receptor beta.[]
J
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6 31st May 08:01
tim jackson
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Posts: 1
Default Jason Winters tea-- Any success ? (cancer)


One can be reasonably sure that there are no genuine general-use cancer
cures hiding in corners of the Internet waiting to be discovered. No-one
with a promising cure is likely to be hawking it mail-order when the drug
companies have billions poised ready to test, standardise, package and reap
profits from anything that can show results. If the world has not beaten a
path to their door there is probably a good reason.

As to whether it is a helpful supplement I don't know, but suspect it rather
depends on what particular aspect you expect it to help with.

Can I suggest the following site for up to date information on the medical
establishment view of a lot of herbal therapies:
http://www.mdanderson.org/cimer
follow the links "Reviews of Therapies" then "Herbal/Plant Therapies"

This link is also on our FAQ at http://www.cancersupporters.com, and there is a
fuller exposition of my thoughts on alternative cancer treatment at
http://www.cancersupporters.com/altmed.html.


Tim Jackson
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7 31st May 08:02
tim jackson
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Posts: 1
Default Jason Winters tea-- Any success ? (cancer)


One can be reasonably sure that there are no genuine general-use cancer
cures hiding in corners of the Internet waiting to be discovered. No-one
with a promising cure is likely to be hawking it mail-order when the drug
companies have billions poised ready to test, standardise, package and reap
profits from anything that can show results. If the world has not beaten a
path to their door there is probably a good reason.

As to whether it is a helpful supplement I don't know, but suspect it rather
depends on what particular aspect you expect it to help with.

Can I suggest the following site for up to date information on the medical
establishment view of a lot of herbal therapies:
http://www.mdanderson.org/cimer
follow the links "Reviews of Therapies" then "Herbal/Plant Therapies"

This link is also on our FAQ at http://www.cancersupporters.com, and there is a
fuller exposition of my thoughts on alternative cancer treatment at
http://www.cancersupporters.com/altmed.html.


Tim Jackson
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8 6th June 21:03
wisampson
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Posts: 1
Default Jason Winters tea-- Any success ? (cancer breast cancer prostate indomethacin)


I also can assure the readers and questioner that Essiac has been tested in
animals and is not considered active. No herb - including green tea, etc., and
no supplement, including soy, etc. has significant effect on breast cancer. Or,
on any cancer (a few exceptions are lycopenes in prostate, but
anti-inflammatory druge are better - indomethacin, Vioxx, etc. Ask the
oncologist, or,
Better yet, check quackwatch.com for Jason Winters and other methods. If
nothing there, get back to me.

W Sampson, MD
Cancer Advisory Council, State of Calif.
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9 6th June 21:03
j
External User
 
Posts: 1
Default Jason Winters tea-- Any success ? (prostate)


says "to be posted"

and http://www.quackwatch.org/01QuackeryRelatedTopics/OTA/ota01.html (dated 1998)


Dr Sampson,
because we get others here claiming to be "doctors", I have to publicly ask you to
adhere to the Charter
http://www.cancersupporters.com/asc/charter.html
There's lots there, including "including some of the text one is replying to" amd
the poster attributions, and bottom-posting, and snipping text, but the main one,
for now is

"Posing as a medical professional is strictly prohibited. For example, don't use a
doctorate in finance or mineralogy to convey the impression that you are a medical
doctor qualified to recommend treatments or diagnose disease. This includes the use
of "Dr., Doc, PhD, RN, LPN, med, etc." in your name, e-mail address, or alias. If
you claim one of these titles be prepared to provide degree, major/minor,
university, year it was earned, and years experience. You must provide substantive
information if asked by any member of the group. "

I'm sure it's just a formality, but if you are uncomfortable posting the specifics
here, please e-mail either
callforvotes@yahoo.ca (which is where I get emails from here) and/or
h2g5c7m1k9a8@bellsouth.net (Jerry) who wrote most of the FAQ/Charter.

Actually offgroup might be better, I'd like to discuss what and the extent of your
role will be here...regular or just the occasional drop by and explain (further)
why I don't always mention Quackwatch.

There certainly is a role for someone with the right credentials to be a "debunker"
here without upsetting the "applecart" too much and/or having the
alt-med/conspiracists come ranting and raving in here and upsetting the patients or
loved ones. It's a delicate balance I'm trying to maintain here, so I've got a
"filter message" ongoing. and we've got Steph here.

Also other newsgroups might need/want you. breast and prostate.
So maybe some of your replies/posts could be cross-posted to those newsgroups also?

We don't cross-post to misc.health.alternative though and/or it's discouraged
because of some of their theories over there and/or to avoid flame wars.

Were you here to let people know how to contact you for the Quackwatch page? Or a
once weekly post about people contacting you? etc etc..
J
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10 9th June 17:02
j
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Posts: 1
Default common sense (was Re: Jason Winters tea-- Any success ? (acupuncture cancer breast cancer chemotherapy)


Thanks Tim,
Wise thoughts.
alt.support.cancer.breast - Frequently asked Questions

Alternative and Complimentary treatments
Tim Jackson

Alternative versus Complementary
Alternative medicine in this context means treatments which are proposed as an
alternative to the recognised therapies for breast cancer. Complimentary
medicine is treatment proposed in addition to conventional therapy.
Complementary therapies are often provided alongside conventional therapies in
cancer centres.


Complimentary medicine
These may be designed to support therapy by making the patient healthier or feel
better, or by addressing some deficiency resulting from the illness. Some
complementary medicines, e.g. acupuncture, is supported by the mainstream
medical community. It is important that any complementary therapy should not
interfere with the primary treatment, and it is a good idea to tell the
oncologist what is planned and obtain his (or her) approval.
Many therapies (eg relaxation therapy, massage, aromtherapy) impart a feeling of
wellbeing, and thus improve quality of life regardless of any medical benefit.


Alternative Medicine
Treatments are advertised which claim to be able to cure or prevent cancer.
Despite these claims, if there were a reliable cure for any cancer among them,
it would not be hiding among the small ads. They often claim that their product
is being suppressed by the establishment, drug companies or government. If there
were a drug that could cure cancer you can be sure that the drug companies would
be falling over each other to make a profit out of it, not trying to suppress
it. Drug companies generally see someone else's patented drug as a starting
point for research to find a better, patentable, product.
When considering alternative medicines a large dose of common sense is required.
There may be benefit in some treatments, and the sellers may genuinely believe
in their product's efficacy, but for every genuine one there are at least ten
charlatans. If an advertisment claims to cure cancer or attacks conventional
therapy, it is probably not soundly based. It is true that conventional
treatments are damaging, disfiguring and unpleasant. However they have been
scientifically proven to reliably drastically reduce the death rate from breast
cancer (and other cancers).

Alternative treatments have not undergone the rigorous testing required of
approved treatments, for efficacy, for side effects, for effect on different age
groups, for toxicity, and there is no regulation of the quality of the products,
or else they have failed such tests, eg Laetrile and Shark Cartilage.

Some therapies claim to enhance the immune system. There is no evidence that
enhancing the immune system improves recovery from or survival of cancer, the
immune system does not generally attack cancer cells as they are part of your
own body. In fact drugs like Herceptin work by marking the cancer cells so that
the immune system does attack them. If the immune system is depressed, e.g. from
chemotherapy, then improving it can help avoid infections. However treatments
must be carefully chosen so as not to interfere with the action of the
chemotherapy drugs.

Many cancer patients change their diets or take supplements such as vitamins.
While a healthy diet is thought to help avoid getting cancer, there no evidence
that changes in diet can help cure it. It is important to stay healthy and
strong, so slimming diets should be avoided. The cancer patient has enough
problems already and may not feel much like eating, or may have difficulty with
some foods, so the addition of dietary discipline is the last thing they need.
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