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1 21st March 02:16
crackwalker
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Posts: 1
Default paranoid personality disorder (hallucinations)


Definition: Paranoid personality disorder is a psychiatric condition
characaterized by pervasive and long-standing extreme distrust and suspicion
of others; hypersensitivity and scanning of the environment for clues that
selectively validate prejudices, attitudes, or biases. Stable psychotic
features such as delusions and hallucinations are absent. An unwarranted
tendency to interpret the actions of other people as deliberately
threatening or demeaning.

Causes, incidence, and risk factors: Personality disorders are chronic
patterns of behavior that cause lasting problems with work and
relationships. The cause of paranoid personality disorder is unknown, but it
appears to be more common in families with psychotic disorders like
schizophrenia and delusional disorder, which suggests a genetic influence.

This condition manifests itself as an unwarranted tendency to interpret the
actions of other people as deliberately threatening or demeaning. People
with a paranoid personality disorder are suspicious of other people, and
they are usually unable to acknowledge their own negative feelings towards
others.

Persons with paranoid personality disorder are hypersensitive. They expect
trickery and disloyalty from other people. And then they try to avoid all
surprises by anticipating them. In an interview people will be intense and
guarded and overly serious. They have difficulty expressing warm emotions
and tolerating feeling anything that is being dependent on another person.
Including feelings of being dependent on the clinician. They are keenly
aware of power and rank. They will often seize upon irrelevant details to
confirm suspicions. And what happens is that they paranoid people generally
do not see the forest for the trees. They will do this about their treatment
as well as other aspects of their life. They have very poor judgment in
matters relating to their specific fears. Often their judgment is not so
impaired in other areas and so can be quite misleading. It's often only when
you get the paranoid person to talk about his or her fears you begin to see
the disordered thinking and paranoid personality disorder.

The main characteristics of paranoid personality disorder are:

Suspicion

With little basis, people with paranoid personality disorder will fear that
others want to harm and exploit them. They may believe that spouses and
friends are being unfaithful or betraying them. Some file lawsuit after
lawsuit in an attempt to keep people from taking advantage of them.

Hold grudges

People with this disorder do not f****ve insults, slights, or injuries
easily. They are known for blaming others for their problems.

Paranoia

As the disorder 's name suggests, they perceive insults and threats from
benign statements or events. They may see character and reputation attacks
that are not apparent to others and may react with anger and counterattacks.

Problems with intimacy

People with paranoid personality disorder may have difficulty getting
intimate with others because they are apprehensive about trusting people.

This pattern of thinking is typically established by early adulthood. It may
affect .5 to 2.5% of the population.
Dual Diagnosis Treatment for the Paranoid Personality Disorder

Clients with PPD may not stay in a treatment program long enough to be
accurately diagnosed. They are so reactive to confrontation that they may
leave treatment despite potential negative consequences, e.g., violation of
probation. Direct and/or early confrontation will provoke hostility and
escalation of dysfunctional defenses. It may be difficult to identify the
intolerance and self-destructive response to confrontation in these clients
as they can so easily confront others. They do not appear particularly
fragile interpersonally. In fact, they have many narcissistic qualities and
both personality disorders may be present. If the paranoid features are
prominent, the underlying fear of malice and harm will become apparent. If
the narcissistic features are prominent, the entitlement and assumption of
personal superiority will become evident. This is an important
differentiation as the individual with a paranoid personality disorder will
respond very badly to direct confrontation (to the point of initiating
litigation) and the individual with a narcissistic personality disorder will
be indifferent to anything short of confrontation. Since substance abuse
treatment requires some reflection, if not confrontation, of drug and
alcohol use, assessing the individual's tolerance for seeing themselves in a
negative light is important. Individuals with narcissistic personality
disorder may be indignant and vulnerable to shame but will return happily to
a psychological place of specialness if they are supported and reassured.
People with PPD, on the other hand, may develop, in response to
confrontation, an intractable view of the service provider(s) as being of
malicious intent and impossible to trust. The damage can be considerable; a
cautious approach with ongoing assessment of level of trust and receptivity
is essential. Clients with PPD may well respond most immediately to a
psychoeducational approach that does not contain personal data, or limits
personal issues to self-reflection. To provide education regarding drugs and
alcohol may well initiate a cognitive recognition and acceptance for
individuals with PPD that they do not want these substances in their lives
doing them harm--all without confrontation or igniting the paranoid defenses

Crackwalker
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2 21st March 02:16
john jay
External User
 
Posts: 1
Default paranoid personality disorder


<big snip>

Was this the reason for your suicide attempt? What were you pananoid
about? Did you worry about how your son would feel without his mother?
Did that make you feel bad? What would have happened to him had you
suceeded? How would he have grown up? How has he grown up under your
care? Has he ever asked you why you tried to abandon him?

Now that I think about it, your actions seem terribly selfish.
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3 21st March 02:17
riccip
External User
 
Posts: 1
Default paranoid personality disorder (phobia)


That's not fair John. I once had a gun to my head and felt my
finger tightening on the trigger. I had kids. At that time you
don't comprehend the effects it could have on others around you.
You firmly believe they would be better off without your
worthless existence. Not a true frame of mind of course but
that's what it's like.

Riccip

================================================
***"Do I have SOCIAL PHOBIA?"
http://www.mge.clara.net/sp/spdef.htm
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4 21st March 02:17
john jay
External User
 
Posts: 1
Default paranoid personality disorder


Of course they're not fair. That person has insulted me several times,
unfairly, after I asked her to stop.

How many times can I say...

I certainly hope you won't be so quick to be insulting next time.

It is of great sadness to me that you continue with these insults. I
hope you realize that if you continue courting disaster, it will come
and it will be very ugly.

An insult may make you feel good but the things I write back certainly
won't.

I've asked you several times to stop. If you continue, the results
will be your doing.

Then why did you answer when I asked you to stop? If you want my
attention, you'll get it, but it won't be positive.

....before I actually back it up?

If she wishes to continue to unfairly insult me and then make a
mean-spirited diagnosis of me then I see no reason she shouldn't get
the same mean attitude and insults back.

This type of engagement seems to be what she wants.

I'm sorry you went through that and hope what I said didn't offend.
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5 21st March 02:17
meryl
External User
 
Posts: 1
Default paranoid personality disorder


Yes, true despair. I often remind myself of the words of the wonderful
LM/Margrove.

Suicide is a long term solution to a short term problem.

Meryl
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6 21st March 02:17
riccip
External User
 
Posts: 1
Default paranoid personality disorder (phobia)


It's just a storm in a teacup mate. Words on a screen. Trading
insults is quite healthy but don't let it turn to spite. Anyway
you're pretty good at pushing people's buttons yourself, and
before you tear me a new asshole I meant that as a
tongue-in-cheek compliment. Incidently I didn't take offence when
I just read a post in which you accuse me of narcassism. ;-)

Riccip

================================================
***"Do I have SOCIAL PHOBIA?"
http://www.mge.clara.net/sp/spdef.htm
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7 21st March 09:11
crackwalker
External User
 
Posts: 1
Default paranoid personality disorder


Was this the reason for your suicide attempt?

No,, I am not paranoid. To which attempt are you referring?


What were you pananoid about?

I wasn't paranoid I was depressed.


Did you worry about how your son would feel without

his mother?

My son is an adult. Parents die when you are an

adult.

Did that make you feel bad?

Any pain my son feels hurts me.

What would have happened to him had you suceeded?

He would have continued his life.

How would he have grown up? He was grown up when

I made my first attempt. He was 22 at the time.

How has he grown up under your care?

Very well thank you.

Has he ever asked you why you tried to abandon him?


If you mean did he ask me why I tried so hard to

off myself. Yes he asked me. And I told him as

clearly as I could.

Now that I think about it, your actions seem terribly

selfish.

There is a bit of hope for you yet JohnJay. Of

course suicide is selfish. It is selfish in another way

then you have just happened on. It is selfish because

you are so self absorbed the rest of the world is a

blur and all you have is a spinning pain in your head.

Selfish. Yes. Selfish because of those you leave

behind. No. At the point of suicide they are better

off without you,. You are doing them a favour. Crackwalker
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8 21st March 09:12
crackwalker
External User
 
Posts: 1
Default paranoid personality disorder


John Jay;

I wish no fight with you. It's not in me to continue in battle to no end.
Let's agree to disagree.

Peace

Crackwalker
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9 21st March 09:12
mruk4u
External User
 
Posts: 1
Default paranoid personality disorder (hallucinations)


Thanks, Crackwalker, for that posting you sent about PPD/Paranoid Personality
Disorder. -(Actually, I think, I will save the text to re-read.)-

I note that nearly ALL traits described there...I can easily relate to as being
deep inside of me, as well.

So, maybe, that's why I find it so damned difficult to let anybody get near
me(including strangers/counsellors, as well-instead, I run from them)...which
is mainly due to lack of trust/and, all sorts of paranoid/or, wholly negative
worries about what dreadful things -(ulterior motives/lies/betrayal/physical
attack/being locked away/-etc.)- might happen next?!


The main characteristics of paranoid personality disorder are:

Suspicion
Hold grudges
Paranoia
Problems with intimacy
<<<

....Yep, I can quite honestly say, I've got the whole damned lot of those...;
and, ALL put togeather, at once!

The only part I didn't relate to was being...narcissistic...; but, then, again,
when I really think about it...I am narcissitic, at least, in my dreams...and,
in fact, I day-dream, constantly, all the time(the only way to escape bitter
reality, as I see it, is to DREAM)...until when the harsh bitter light of
reality, quite suddenly, appears to wake me up...(I'm NOT Elvis/I'm NOT Bruce
Lee, anymore?)!

Then, I will instantly revert back to my usual feelings of having all 100% pure
self-hate deep down inside...at being most utterly useless, untalented, plain,
ugly, boring, extremely difficult, exceedingly awkward, 'normal' -totally
f***ed up, mostly, with endless worrying- me!


Definition: Paranoid personality disorder is a psychiatric condition
characaterized by pervasive and long-standing extreme distrust and suspicion
of others; hypersensitivity and scanning of the environment for clues that
selectively validate prejudices, attitudes, or biases. Stable psychotic
features such as delusions and hallucinations are absent. An unwarranted
tendency to interpret the actions of other people as deliberately
threatening or demeaning.

Causes, incidence, and risk factors: Personality disorders are chronic
patterns of behavior that cause lasting problems with work and
relationships. The cause of paranoid personality disorder is unknown, but it
appears to be more common in families with psychotic disorders like
schizophrenia and delusional disorder, which suggests a genetic influence.

This condition manifests itself as an unwarranted tendency to interpret the
actions of other people as deliberately threatening or demeaning. People
with a paranoid personality disorder are suspicious of other people, and
they are usually unable to acknowledge their own negative feelings towards
others.

Persons with paranoid personality disorder are hypersensitive. They expect
trickery and disloyalty from other people. And then they try to avoid all
surprises by anticipating them. In an interview people will be intense and
guarded and overly serious. They have difficulty expressing warm emotions
and tolerating feeling anything that is being dependent on another person.
Including feelings of being dependent on the clinician. They are keenly
aware of power and rank. They will often seize upon irrelevant details to
confirm suspicions. And what happens is that they paranoid people generally
do not see the forest for the trees. They will do this about their treatment
as well as other aspects of their life. They have very poor judgment in
matters relating to their specific fears. Often their judgment is not so
impaired in other areas and so can be quite misleading. It's often only when
you get the paranoid person to talk about his or her fears you begin to see
the disordered thinking and paranoid personality disorder.

The main characteristics of paranoid personality disorder are:

Suspicion

With little basis, people with paranoid personality disorder will fear that
others want to harm and exploit them. They may believe that spouses and
friends are being unfaithful or betraying them. Some file lawsuit after
lawsuit in an attempt to keep people from taking advantage of them.

Hold grudges

People with this disorder do not f****ve insults, slights, or injuries
easily. They are known for blaming others for their problems.

Paranoia

As the disorder 's name suggests, they perceive insults and threats from
benign statements or events. They may see character and reputation attacks
that are not apparent to others and may react with anger and counterattacks.

Problems with intimacy

People with paranoid personality disorder may have difficulty getting
intimate with others because they are apprehensive about trusting people.

This pattern of thinking is typically established by early adulthood. It may
affect .5 to 2.5% of the population.
Dual Diagnosis Treatment for the Paranoid Personality Disorder

Clients with PPD may not stay in a treatment program long enough to be
accurately diagnosed. They are so reactive to confrontation that they may
leave treatment despite potential negative consequences, e.g., violation of
probation. Direct and/or early confrontation will provoke hostility and
escalation of dysfunctional defenses. It may be difficult to identify the
intolerance and self-destructive response to confrontation in these clients
as they can so easily confront others. They do not appear particularly
fragile interpersonally. In fact, they have many narcissistic qualities and
both personality disorders may be present. If the paranoid features are
prominent, the underlying fear of malice and harm will become apparent. If
the narcissistic features are prominent, the entitlement and assumption of
personal superiority will become evident. This is an important
differentiation as the individual with a paranoid personality disorder will
respond very badly to direct confrontation (to the point of initiating
litigation) and the individual with a narcissistic personality disorder will
be indifferent to anything short of confrontation. Since substance abuse
treatment requires some reflection, if not confrontation, of drug and
alcohol use, assessing the individual's tolerance for seeing themselves in a
negative light is important. Individuals with narcissistic personality
disorder may be indignant and vulnerable to shame but will return happily to
a psychological place of specialness if they are supported and reassured.
People with PPD, on the other hand, may develop, in response to
confrontation, an intractable view of the service provider(s) as being of
malicious intent and impossible to trust. The damage can be considerable; a
cautious approach with ongoing assessment of level of trust and receptivity
is essential. Clients with PPD may well respond most immediately to a
psychoeducational approach that does not contain personal data, or limits
personal issues to self-reflection. To provide education regarding drugs and
alcohol may well initiate a cognitive recognition and acceptance for
individuals with PPD that they do not want these substances in their lives
doing them harm--all without confrontation or igniting the paranoid defenses

Crackwalker
<<<
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10 21st March 09:12
mruk4u
External User
 
Posts: 1
Default paranoid personality disorder (depression)


....as to suicide...I've previously heard it being defined as...

HOLDING ON...WHEN...THERE IS ABSOLUTELY NOTHING LEFT TO HOLD ON TO???!!!...

....yes, I've already been there/done that.
When you've NEVER been there before -(experienced serious depression)-...that's
when I think it's, quite truly, the most scary...as you don't even realise
there CAN be light found at the end of the exceedingly long ever-darkening
tunnel.

But, once you've already been there before...-(at least, in my own
experience)-...then, you KNOW there WILL be light found at the end of the
exceedingly long ever-darkening tunnel.

....But, all you have to do is WAIT for that LIGHT to appear, again...that
WAITING can be really hard, though...when your mind is just tuned into thinking
wholly 100% negative, negative, NEGATIVE...and, so, it's IMPOSSIBLE to think
POSITIVE, anymore?!

One does tend to think, during such deeply despairing moments, that everybody
else in this whole wide world really would be far better off without you...

....and, therefore, by doing yourself in...you would, in fact, be doing a real
big favour to everybody else...(including family/friends/strangers)...as you
would no longer be holding them back from getting on with being happy,
anymore...simply, because, you yourself are ALWAYS feeling sad!

But, then, when one succeeds in holding on...

HOLDING ON...WHEN...THERE IS ABSOLUTELY NOTHING LEFT TO HOLD ON TO???!!!...

....then, one's spirit to live -VERY slowly- revives back, again...and, you find
you can LAUGH, and, join in with others...once more, seeing/feeling things that
are FUN!

For me, the way I know I am getting, quite seriously, depressed...is the moment
I find I've STOPPED laughing...jokes/fun/life/people...all seem utterly
meaningliess...and, then, you wonder what is the point of living anymore?!
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