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1 3rd May 04:03
danny burstein
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Posts: 1
Default smallpox vaccine nearly kills a soldier's kid (smallpox orthopoxvirus vaccinia virus atopic dermatitis)


( Note: original url includes a textbook level photo
of the kid with smallpox scabbing )
--------------
[ excerpts ]

Household Transmission of Vaccinia Virus from Contact with a Military Smallpox
Vaccinee --- Illinois and Indiana, 2007

On March 7, 2007, the Chicago Department of Public Health and the University of
Chicago Pediatric Infectious Disease Service and Infection Control Program
notified CDC of a child with presumed eczema vaccinatum (EV), a
life-threatening complication of vaccinia virus infection (1). This is the
first reported EV case in the United States since 1988 (2).
...
On January 26, 2007, an active-duty U.S. service member received a first-time
smallpox vaccination in preparation for overseas military deployment. He had a
history of childhood atopic dermatitis (i.e., eczema) and household contact
with persons with eczema (two of his three children), both of which are
contraindications to vaccination. His deployment was delayed, so he made an
unplanned visit home to visit his family in Indiana during February 16--20.
...
On March 3, the child was taken to a small, local Indiana hospital because of a
generalized papular, vesicular rash on the face, neck, and upper extremities.
Because of the severity of the illness, he was transferred to a tertiary-care
facility in Chicago later that day; contact precautions were implemented at the
hospital.
...
On March 8, lesion specimens were ****yzed at the Illinois Department of Public
Health Laboratory (IDPHL) in Chicago by real-time polymerase
chain reaction (PCR) orthopoxvirus generic assay and nonvariola
orthopoxvirus assay. The results of the assays were positive for
orthopoxvirus DNA, supporting the clinical diagnosis of EV. The diagnosis of
vaccinia was confirmed at CDC.

rest:
http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm5619a4.htm
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