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1 20th October 19:12
joseph bowen
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Posts: 1
Default getting a dendrobium to bloom


I have two dendrobia, each of which is growing a new stalk. To encourage foliage growth, I've been watering regularly, but I understand that to encourage flowers, I need to let the plant stress a bit. Anybody have thoughts on how/when this is done?

Also, I have a dendrobium from a friend that had been neglected. The den. had been neglected, not the friend. At the top of one of its stalks, which has no leaves, has sprouted a young plant, roots and all. So far, I've just been spraying it with water/fertilizer and it seems rather happy with the world. 1) how do I know when to separate the baby from the mother and pot it and 2) is it possible for me to force this behavior of the plant to get more babies? 3) do other orchid species have this type of behavior?


Thanks,
Joe

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2 20th October 19:14
yipperc
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Posts: 1
Default getting a dendrobium to bloom


My neighbor, who is the orchid lady at the SF Conservatory, says that
she stresses the hell out of all the dendrobiums between Nov-Jan.
She says that during this time, the dens are moved to an outside
enclosure that is not temperature controlled, and dark. She does not
water or feed them. They essentially completely stress out, drop all
their leaves and the canes become shriveled.

In Feb. she moves them all to a lighted greenhouse, and starts
watering and fertilizing. Everytime they are watered, they are also
fertilized. This pumps them all up and again, and they start
flowering. Then, they get moved back to the exhibit rooms.

So, I guess, stress the heck out of them!

encourage foliage growth, I've been watering regularly, but I
understand that to encourage flowers, I need to let the plant stress
a bit. Anybody have thoughts on how/when this is done?


The den. had been neglected, not the friend. At the top of one of
its stalks, which has no leaves, has sprouted a young plant, roots
and all. So far, I've just been spraying it with water/fertilizer
and it seems rather happy with the world. 1) how do I know when to
separate the baby from the mother and pot it and 2) is it possible
for me to force this behavior of the plant to get more babies? 3) do
other orchid species have this type of behavior?
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3 20th October 19:16
renee lichtman
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Posts: 1
Default getting a dendrobium to bloom


Which type of dendrobium is she talking about. Not all types of
dendrobium lose their leaves seasonaly. Maybe someone eles knows this
topic better than me because although I know there is a difference I
can't remember more than this right now. Then again if she does mean all
types that would be important to know.
Renee FW Lichtman
Artist and Printmaker
http://www.galleryrenee.com
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4 20th October 19:17
elainea400@aolcom
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Posts: 1
Default getting a dendrobium to bloom


Hello friends ;
The Dens are one of my favorites; I think the lady may be growing Den
Nobles ; those response to streesing ; on the other hand I grow Den phals that
keep thier leaves and tho watering is reduced after flowering until new
growth from the bottem is about 3 inch tall; mine are now in spike after
spending the summer outside and generally bloom most of the winter in
the cool greenhouse ;
Elaine in Cleveland , Ohio on the banks of lake Erie
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5 20th October 19:17
binkylin
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Posts: 1
Default getting a dendrobium to bloom


Hi Joe,

If your dendrobiums do not lose their leaves in the fall/winter then
you have phalaenopsis type dendrobiums. They grow throughout the
year and should be watered and fertilized year round. During fall
and winter when growth slows down, reduce watering and fertilizing
dilution/frequency but there is no need to torture the plants with
Machiavellian methods =). Since dendrobiums need very high levels
of light (near cattleya-levels), having adequate light is usually
the determining factor in whether or not they will fower.

As for your friend's dendrobium, when neglected, they will produce
keikis (baby plants) in an attempt to survive another generation.
You can separate it from the stalk when the roots grow out an inch
or you can leave it on and just let it grow. If you want to produce
keikis you can apply keiki paste. I've never used it so can't vouch
for it's effectness. You can google search "keiki paste" for more
info or maybe someone here has had experience with it and can add
some insight?

Along with dendrobiums, phalaenopsis and vandas are some of the more
commonly grown orchids that produce keikis. Cattleyas, oncidinae,
cymbidiums and phrags/paphs do not produce keikis....I'm sure
there's more to the keiki list but in my limited experience, that's
all I know of.

HTH,

Steph

encourage foliage growth, I've been watering regularly, but I
understand that to encourage flowers, I need to let the plant stress
a bit. Anybody have thoughts on how/when this is done?


neglected. The den. had been neglected, not the friend. At the top
of one of its stalks, which has no leaves, has sprouted a young
plant, roots and all. So far, I've just been spraying it with
water/fertilizer and it seems rather happy with the world. 1) how
do I know when to separate the baby from the mother and pot it and
2) is it possible for me to force this behavior of the plant to get
more babies? 3) do other orchid species have this type of behavior?
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6 16th November 23:59
fancytreats
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Posts: 1
Default getting a dendrobium to bloom


Hello. I am new to this forum (because I tend to kill every orchid
I've ever had!) This comforts me in a way because I've been
watching my own neglected plants drop leaves and canes shrivel...I
guess then I should just move them & keep an eye on them 'til
after "winter"?

Thanks,

Dawn
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7 17th November 00:03
nancy
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Posts: 1
Default getting a dendrobium to bloom


Hi Dawn, and welcome to this group -
Whenever my spouse comments on an orchid that has lost
its will to live (I have never killed an orchid), I
tell him that it is deciduous. Deciduous cattleyas,
deciduous stanhopeas, etc.
Cheers - Nancy
<Hello. I am new to this forum (because I tend to
kill
every orchid
I've ever had!) This comforts me in a way because
I've been
watching my own neglected plants drop leaves and canes

shrivel...I
guess then I should just move them & keep an eye on
them 'til
after "winter"?


~~~~~~~~~~~
"He used statistics as a drunken man uses lampposts;
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