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1 25th November 05:53
michael bulatovich
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Posts: 1
Default Bichon Skin Problems


Our nine year old Bichon has recently developed a couple of problems on or
just under the skin.

The first we noticed are a few pea-sized, hairless, pink 'boils' on his back
mainly. I have heard that this breed , and other all white breads, are know
for "skin problems", but have found very little specific information on the
web about it. I have also heard that some of these "problems" can be allergy
related.

This dog is shampooed every month or so, and gets an application of a
heartworm medication between the shoulder blades, and I worry that these
might be causing the problems. The boils don't seem to bother him much, but,
so far, are in places where he couldn't reach with his teeth or claws, so we
can't be sure of that.

Another issue is the recent discovery of a flattish, lens shaped 'lump' on
his ribs on one side. It seems to be able to move around independently the
skin, and just beneath it.

Anyone have any information, directions, etc?
--


MichaelB
http://www.michaelbulatovich.ca
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2 25th November 05:53
tote@dog-playcom
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Posts: 1
Default Bichon Skin Problems


On Sat, 10 Jun 2006 19:25:12 -0400 Michael Bulatovich <Please@dont.try> whittled these words:

Are you planning to take the dog to the vet for a real diagnosis?

--
Diane Blackman
There is no moral victory in proclaiming to abhor violence
while preaching with violent words.
http://dog-play.com/ http://dogplayshops.com/
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3 25th November 05:54
michael bulatovich
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Posts: 1
Default Bichon Skin Problems


Just came from there. He shrugged it off, since they had no "roots". The
"breed is known for skin problems". (I admit that we have not found what we
consider to be great veterinary practitioners nearby. Hence the resort to
the web and to newsgroups.)

--


MichaelB
http://www.michaelbulatovich.ca
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4 25th November 05:57
ginal
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Posts: 1
Default Bichon Skin Problems


Our bichon developed those as he aged as well. I forget the exact term
for them but I don't think it's a big deal. It's benign. Sometimes,
they may bleed, like if your dog chews on it. I think the only reason
to get them removed is mainly for cosmetic reasons. As for the lump on
his ribs, if it moves, it's more likely to be benign although of course
you'd want a vet to look at it. It may simply be a lipoma - ie fatty
tumor that is benign. I don't know if your dog has allergies or not
but when our dog had them, we gave him Avoderm canned food and it
seemed to help a lot. Are you using Revolution for heartworm?
Wondering cause I might try that.
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5 25th November 05:59
human_and_animal_behavior_forensic_sciences_research_laboratory@hotmailcom
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Posts: 1
Default Bichon Skin Problems


HOWEDY GinaL,


They're called STRESS INDUCED AUTO-IMMUNE DIS-EASE aka The Puppy
Wizard's Syndrome <{) : ~ ( >


Right. The symptoms vary from benign tumors to allergys to chronic ear
and
urinary tract infections cushings and addisons DIS-EASE diabetes,
blindness,
seizurs, cancers, even dental and crippling ligament DIS-EASE <{) : ~ (


Right. HOWEver, the SYNDROME IS CHRONIC and DEATHLY <{) : ~ ( >


RIGHT. HOWEver, it's a SYMPTOM of a CHRONIC DEATHLY CONDITION.

And you can BUY THAT from your VETERINARIAN?


Can you likeWIZE BUY THAT from your VETERINARIAN?


THAT'S INSANE:

http://www.shirleys-wellness-cafe.com/petallergies.htm
has LOTS MOORE INFORMATION and well worth readin.

Here's a few E***CERPTS:

Flea Control Products and Their Hazards

Many flea control pesticides have significant hazards. In Table
1 we have outlined the effects of twenty ingredients in flea
control products. The chart uses data from published studies, as
well as information from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
(EPA) and other government agencies. (Complete references are given
on page 10.)

The chart is dense and not easy to read, but the stark conclusions
from studying the chart are straightforward. In general, flea control
insecticides are a hazardous group. Over two-thirds of the chemicals
in the table are neurotoxic, and almost that many have caused
reproductive
problems in laboratory tests.

Half of the chemicals are classified as carcinogens by EPA, or have
been associated with increased cancer risks in epidemiological or
laboratory studies. A quarter of them are known to cause genetic
damage in at least one test. Almost all have environmental concerns.

If you are considering the use of a flea pesticide, please carefully
read the section of the chart about that chemical before you make
your decision. If you would like more detailed information about
any of the chemicals, contact NCAP.

Jeffrey Levy, DVM - "Have you ever wondered why some dogs
and cats have severe flea problems, while others are hardly
bothered by the little pests? Fleas can be viewed as an
indicator of an animal's general health. Parasites in general,
and fleas in particular, are most attracted to the weak,
unhealthy, or very young animal whose immune system is not
functioning well. The long-term solution to a flea problem
is to reduce your pet's susceptibility to fleas by improving
his/her health."

Allergies can be, and often are, unrecognized deficiency diseases.
Recognizing
nutritional deficiencies will save you a great deal of frustration and
allow you to
make the necessary adjustments in your dog's diet.

Do You Really Know What's In Your Pet's Food? by Dr. Jane Bicks
DVM and Toxic Pet Food

Doctors tell you that steroids (cortisone, prednisone) only cause
side effects after many years. But new research shows that permanent
damage is immediate and devastating. Studies show that steroids cause
permanent, debilitating effects after a single dosage.

"Steroids are probably the most sleazy of modern day medications"
says John Mills, former professor of medicine at the University of
California, San Francisco and chief of infectious diseases at San
Francisco General Hospital more on the danger of steroids

People that have pets with skin problems, allergies, stomach
problems and behavioral problems spend hundreds of dollars at the
vet on antibiotics, steroids, tranquilizers, and other medication.
Antibiotics, steroids, and many other medications take a serious
toll on the internal organs and immune systems of our pets.

It becomes a never-ending circle of medication and sickness. Skin
problems and allergies are often symptoms of nutritional deficiency
and toxic overload.

* Naturopathic principles for animals suffering from allergies
Do no harm. The animal's condition must not be made worse in the
long run to alleviate symptoms. Vaccines and flea and heart worm
prevention can add to the body's toxic load, which can lead to
further immune system compromise.

* Identify and eliminate the cause/s and obstacles to cure.
First, rule out skin parasites such as mites, fleas, ringworm (a
fungal infection), Leishmaniasis (for dogs from warmer climates)
and systemic diseases such hypothyroidism, Lupus, Vasculitis,
Phemphigus, etc. Identify and, if possible, avoid allergens to
give rapid relief. Look at the animal's environment when considering
allergens (pollens, plastics, nylon, wool, etc.), toxins (pesticides,
chemicals, etc.), irritants and more.

* Use the curative power of nature. By eliminating causes and
supporting organ and immune function with good diet, detoxification
and supplements, the body will heal itself.

* Prevent the condition. An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of
cure.


Cynthia Harcourt, DVM - "Allergies represent more than a
local inflammation of the skin. They reflect a constitutional
state. From a holistic standpoint, the approach to treatment
recognizes the deeper constitutional state and restores order
and balance to the whole animal."

Dr. Blanco, D.V.M - "You take healthy animals and often very
quickly after you vaccinate, you can see simple things like itching
of the skin or excessive licking of the paws, sometimes even with
no eruptions.

We see a lot of epilepsy, often after a rabies vaccination. Or
dogs or cats can become aggressive for several days. Frequently,
you'll see urinary tract infections in cats, often within three
months after their [annual] vaccination. If you step back, open
your mind and heart, you'll start to see patterns of illness
post-vaccination." more about vaccinosis

Alfred Plechner, DVM - "The most common and most visible
symptoms of nutritionally caused deficiencies are allergies of
one kind or another. Because many commercial foods are woefully
deficient in key nutrients, the long term effect of feeding such
foods makes the dog hypersensitive to its environment. . . It's
a dinosaur effect. Animals are being programmed for disaster, for
extinction.

Many of them are biochemical cripples with defective adrenal
glands unable to manufacture adequate cortisol, a hormone
vital for health and resistance to disease."

Charles E Loops DVM - "Homeopathic veterinarians and other
holistic practitioners have maintained for some time that
vaccinations do more harm than they provide benefits. Vaccinations
represent a major assault on the body's immune system.... Vaccine
induced chronic diseases range from life-threatening conditions
such as auto-immune crises to conditions destroying the quality
of life of an animal as in chronic skin allergies."

Autumn Drouin, DVM, ND "Do no harm. The animal's condition
must not be made worse in the long run to alleviate symptoms.

Vaccines and flea and heart worm prevention can add to the
body's toxic load, which can lead to further immune system
compromise.

Identify and eliminate the cause/s and obstacles to cure.

First, rule out skin parasites such as mites, fleas, ringworm
(a fungal infection), Leishmaniasis (for dogs from warmer
climates) and systemic diseases such hypothyroidism, Lupus,
Vasculitis, Phemphigus, etc. Identify and, if possible, avoid
allergens to give rapid relief. L

ook at the animal's environment when considering allergens
(pollens, plastics, nylon, wool, etc.), toxins (pesticides,
chemicals, etc.), irritants and more. Use the curative power
of nature.

By eliminating causes and supporting organ and immune function
with good diet, detoxification and supplements, the body will
heal itself. Prevent the condition. An ounce of prevention is
worth a pound of cure."

Pets are commonly afflicted with stubborn allergies that are a
source of much distress--and expense--for their owners. And, very
commonly--just as with their owners--medical interventions that
mainly focus on treating the symptoms are quite ineffective. The
findings of Glycobiology suggest that this prevailing approach may
be barking up the wrong tree, so to speak, and that a nutritional
intervention that, instead, supplies the body with crucial
micronutrients that are lacking is likely to be far more effective.
Glycobiology has now established that every cell in the mammalian body
requires eight essential saccharides molecules in order to function
effectively.

These saccharides combine with protein and fat molecules into
glycoforms that attach themselves to the surfaces of every cell
in the body. Under an electron microscope, they look like weird
trees growing on the cell surface. One of their most important
functions there is to allow cells to communicate effectively
with each other.

To the degree that these saccharides are deficient, cell-to-cell
communication tends to break down and some form of illness starts
to develop.

An insufficiency of these saccharide molecules is particularly
disastrous for the immune system, because it causes the cells
of the immune system to become, in effect, partially blind.

These cells can then become over-reactive in attacking allergens
of all kinds and even in attacking the tissues of the body; on
the other hand, ironically, they may become under-reactive in
attacking true pathogens that are serious threats to the body. --------------------


WHAT IS A MAST CELL?

A normal mast cell is part of our immunologic defense systems against
invading organisms. Mast cells are meant to participate in the war
against parasites (as opposed to the war against bacterial or viral
invaders). They are bound within tissues that interface with the
external world such as the skin, respiratory or intestinal tract. They
do not circulate through the body.


The mast cell possesses within itself granules of especially
inflammatory biochemicals meant for use against invading parasites.
(Think of these as small bombs that can be released). The mast cell has
binding sites on its surface for a special type of antibody called
"IgE." IgE is produced in response to exposure to antigens typical
of parasites (i.e. worm skin proteins, or similarly shaped proteins).
IgE antibodies find their way to a tissue mast cell and perch there.
With enough exposure to the antigen in question, the mast cell may be
covered with IgE antibodies like the fluff of a dandelion. The mast
cell is said, at this point, to be "sensitized."

The IgE antibodies are "Y" shaped. Their foot is planted in the
mast cell while their arms lift up hoping to capture their antigen.
When the antigen comes by and is grasped by the IgE antibodies, this
should indicate that a parasite is near and the mast cell, like a land
mine, degranulates releasing its toxic biochemical weapons. These
chemicals are harmful to the parasite plus serve as signals to other
immune cells that a battle is in progress and for them to come and join
in.

At least this is what is supposed to happen.

We live in a clean world without a lot of parasites. What unfortunately
tends to happen is that the IgE/mast cell system is stimulated with
other antigens that are of similar shape or size as parasitic antigens.
These "next best" antigens are usually pollen proteins and the
result is an allergy. Instead of killing the invading parasite, the
mast cell biochemicals produce local redness, itch, swelling, and other
symptoms we associate with allergic reactions.

AND THE MAST CELL TUMOR?

As if the mast cell isn't enough of a troublemaker in this regard,
the mast cell can form a tumor made of many mast cells. When this
happens, the cells of the tumor are unstable. This means they releases
their toxic granules with simple contact or even at random creating
allergic symptoms that do not correlate with exposure to any particular
antigen.

Mast cell tumors are notoriously invasive and difficult to treat.

CANINE

Mast cell tumors are especially common in dogs accounting for
approximately one skin tumor in every five. The Boxer is at an
especially high risk as are related breeds: English Bulldog, Boston
Terrier).

Boxer

English Bulldog

Boston Terrier

Also at higher than average risk are the Shar pei, Labrador Retriever,
Golden Retriever, Schnauzer, and ****er Spaniel. Most mast cell tumors
arise in the skin but technically they can arise anywhere that mast
cells are found. The mast cell tumor does not have a characteristic
appearance though because of the tumor's ability to cause swelling
through the release of granules, it is not unusual for the owner to
notice a sudden change in the size of the growth or, for that matter,
that the growth is itchy or bothersome to the patient.

Several contributing factors in the development of skin tumors include
viruses, solar and ionizing radiation, hormones, genetic influences,
vaccines, thermal injuries, and immunologic influences.

The history for an animal with a cutaneous tumor is variable. Commonly,
owners will discover a growth while examining or grooming their pets.
Benign tumors are more likely to have a history of slow growth from
weeks to years. It is not unusual for benign epithelial tumors to be
presented for ulceration due to self-trauma or secondary inflammation.
Most benign tumors are well cir***scribed, nonpainful, and freely
movable and incite a minimal inflammatory response. Malignant tumors
are often rapidly growing, fixed to underlying structures and ulcerated
and will often have ill-defined margins. Invasion into vessels and
regional lymphatics is often observed.

Sebaceous Gland Tumors

Sebaceous gland tumors represent a complex array of growths that can be
divided into four groups based on histologic appearance. These are, in
decreasing frequency, sebaceous hyperplasia, sebaceous epithelioma,
sebaceous adenoma, and sebaceous adenocarcinoma. Sebaceous gland tumors
are among the most common skin tumors in the dog, accounting for 6.8 to

7.9% of all skin tumors. Sebaceous gland tumors are less common in the
cat, accounting for 2.3 to 4.4% of all skin tumors.

Modified sebaccous glands are found in a variety of locations and may
give rise to neoplastic growths, including eyelid meibomian gland
tumors
and peri**** gland tumors .

Sebaceous hyperplasia accounts for the majority of sebaceous gland
tumors in the dog. They are characterized histologically by an
ac***ulation of nearly mature sebaceous glands. Most are solitary;
however, multiple lesions can occur. They are found on older animals
(mean 9.1 years), and miniature schnauzers, beagles, poodles, and
****er spaniels appear to be over-represented. They can occur anywhere
on the body but most are found on the limbs, trunk and eyelids.

Most are less than 1 cm in diameter, wartlike or cauliflowerlike,
and can become ulcerated because of trauma. In a compilation of 92
cases in the dog, only one recurred following excision; however,
nearly 10% of cases developed new lesions at other body sites.

Sebaceous hyperplasia is often found peripheral to and phasing into
sebaceous adenomas or adenocarcinomas and is likely a precursor to
their development. In the cat, sebaceous hyperplasia is typically a
solitary lesion more common on the head, with a male predisposition.

Lesions may be present for many years. Recurrence has not been
reported following excision.

Sebaceous epithelioma, occurs primarily on the head (especially
the eyelid) as a solitary lesion, however, generalized cases have
been reported. These lesions are nearly identical in appearance
to sebaceous hyperplasia and the treatment of choice is
They are more likely to recur than sebaceous hyperplasia or adenoma,
though the recurrence rate is still low, at approximately 6%.

Sebaceous adenomas are relatively uncommon sebaceous gland tumors,
similar in appearance and behavior to hyperplastic lesions. Sebaceous
adenocarcinomas are rare in the cat and dog and appear to have a low
potential for metastasis and recurrence. They are characterized by
ulceration and inflammation of surrounding tissues. More aggressive
surgical excision is indicated fot these tumors.

=========================

Nonmalignant Tumors of the Skin and Soft Tissues

Nonmalignant skin tumors and cysts were among the most frequently
reported health problems on the recently completed FCRSA health survey.
For example, over 14% of the Flat-Coats in the survey have had a
histiocytoma.
Lipomas and sebaceous cysts were reported in over 10%
of the dogs in the survey. Because of the time you spend grooming and
petting your dog, you are the one most likely to discover a tumor of
the skin.

The skin is composed of two layers. The outer layer, called the
epidermis
or cuticle, is several cell layers thick and has an external layer of
dead cells.
These dead cells are continually shed from the surface and replaced
from
below from a basal layer of cells. The inner layer of the skin is
called the
dermis or corium. It is composed of tissues that form a network which
includes collagen, elastic fibers, blood vessels, nerves, fat and hair
follicles.
Each of these various tissues in the skin has the potential to produce
a tumor.

The names of the various skin tumors are assigned according to the type
of the cell of origin.
The Merck Manual cautions, "Because of the diversity of cutaneous
tumors, their classification
is difficult and, for many, there is controversy as to the cell of
origin. There is also controversy
as to what criteria should be used to establish whether a lesion that
arises in the skin or soft
tissues is or is not a neoplasm, and if so, whether it is benign or
malignant."

A definitive diagnosis is possible only through histopathology
(microscopic evaluation) of a biopsy.
The surgeon's gross diagnosis is correct less than 50% of the time. The
following descriptions are
meant to give a brief, general overview of benign tumors. Your first
step, should you find a growth
on your dog's skin, is to get a diagnosis from your veterinarian.

Treatment for most benign tumors is similar. Depending on the type,
size, location and condition
of the tumor as well as the age and health of the dog, the best course
of action may be to just
monitor the growth. In cases where treatment is indicated, surgical
removal offers the best chance
of cure. As with any tumor, as complete excision of the growth as
possible is recommended.

Basal Cell Tumors are skin tumors that are generally benign and are
common in middle-aged and
older dogs. They are most frequently found on the head, neck and
shoulders. They are slow-growing.
They may become ulcerated and develop secondary bacterial infection.

Cutaneous Cysts are usually malformations of the hair follicle which
result in abnormal sac-like
structures in the skin. Surgical removal is the best treatment. These
cysts should never be squeezed
since a severe inflammatory reaction could develop.

Hemangiomas are nonmalignant growths that develop from blood vessels.
Although benign, it is i
mportant to obtain a definitive diagnosis to rule out its malignant
counterpart, hemangiosarcoma.
Hemangiomas tend to ulcerate. Again, surgical removal is recommended.

Histiocytomas are another common skin tumor. The exact cell of origin
of this tumor is unknown.

Some evidence points to a viral cause, although no specific virus has
yet been identified. Again,
this type of tumor is difficult to diagnose and it can be confused with
some malignant neoplasms.
Although benign histiocytomas can resolve spontaneously within two to
three months, the best
course of action is to have them surgically removed and biopsied.

Lipomas are quite common in older dogs. They usually appear as
slow-growing, soft, discrete,
round masses right under the skin. They are usually freely movable.
Despite their benign
characteristics, these tumors should also be removed because they can
become quite large and
impinge on surrounding tissues or impede limb movement. They are also
difficult to distinguish
from infiltrating lipomas or from malignant liposarcomas.

Sebaceous Gland Tumors are also common. They are derived from sebaceous
glands usually
attached to hair follicles in the dermal layer of the skin. The sebum
normally produced by these
glands will form the content of a sebaceous cyst. These will appear
anywhere on the body as
raised, horny growths, perhaps with an ulcerated surface. These tumors
are benign, but again
surgical removal and biopsy should be done to distinguish them from
sebaceous gland adenocarcinoma.
Complete excision is recommended to prevent recurrence.

Warts are usually caused by one of two papilloma viruses. One causes
oral papillomas which occur
on the palate, tongue and/or esophagus. The other type causes warts to
appear on the face, neck
and limbs. Warts may also be caused by some noninfectious irritants
which produce a solitary wart.

Viruses usually cause multiple warts. Younger dogs are more likely to
be affected by papilloma viruses,
but after they recover, they are usually immune to further infection.
Surgical crushing of some of the viral
warts speeds remission. Affected dogs should be isolated from other
dogs to prevent spread of the infection.
There is no danger to other species.
  Reply With Quote
6 25th November 05:59
michael bulatovich
External User
 
Posts: 1
Default Bichon Skin Problems


Thanks for the reply. The thing on his ribs *feels* fatty.

I've been looking into the allergy explanation, but have yet to approach the
vet about it. Last time we brought up a symptom, it cost a thousand in fees,
they shrugged their shoulders in the end, and suggested more tests. The
condition cleared up on its own and our current thinking is that it was a
vaccine reaction. We haven't vaccinated him as often, and it hasn't come
back. (They were playing with the idea it was Lupus!)

We are giving him "Advantage multi 20" by Bayer for
fleas/heartworm/nematodes. It's his second year on that.

Did your dog outgrow the allergies?
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7 25th November 06:00
human_and_animal_behavior_forensic_sciences_research_laboratory@hotmailcom
External User
 
Posts: 1
Default Bichon Skin Problems


HOWEDY michael,


Yeah. Perhaps you MISSED The Insanely Freakin Simply Amazing Grand
Puppy Wizard's REPLY. OR perhaps you didn't think HE was responding
to YOUR post when HE replied to the other simpleton?


That so? CuriHOWES AIN'T IT HOWE COME you OVERLOOKED The
Insanely Freakin Simply Amazing Grand Puppy Wizard's REPLY seein
as it COVERED ALL THEM ISSUES, michael?


You mean your veterinary MALPRACTICIONER, michael.


Naaaah? THOWESANDS??? JUST LIKE THAT, hunh???


Naaaaah? JUST LIKE THAT, hunh???

Naaaaah? DO TELL???

Oh? YOU MEAN LIKE HOWE The Insanely Simply Freakin
Simply Amazing Grand Puppy Wizard TOLD YOU??? BEWEEEAHAHAHAHAHAHHAAHAAA!!!


Naaah? JUST LIKE THAT, hunh???


Naaaaah??? DO TELL???

Hey michael? Does your vet GOT TESTS FOR THAT??? BWEEEEAAAAHAHAHAHHAHAAAAA!!!

Oh? And can you BUY THAT from YOUR VETERINARY MALPRACTICIONER?

Naaah? DO TELL???


Advantage Flea product: how safe or how toxic is it?

* Here is a testimonial from a distraught cat owner
"Used Advantage on my cat and shes sick"

* Mary Ann lost her beloved bearded collie 'Kaimen' as a
result of using Advantage Flea Drops. "Advantage flea drops were
recomended by my veteranarian to control Kaimens flea problems.

The drops were placed on the back of his head in the nape of the
neck. After using Advantage for 13 months a growth the size of a
golf ball emerged in that very same spot where the Advantage flea
drop were placed.

The growth was made of a grey colored flesh with a putrid odor.

A purulent putrid liquid oozed out of it. Kaimen was taking to the
vet, where I learned more about the growth and just how deadly
Advantage is to our pets. The pesticide that is used in Advantage
is called lmidacloprid and should NOT be absorbed through the skin.

I learned that dogs and rats who were used to test this pesticide
developped thyroid cancer and it affected their appetite. My dog
Kaimen died at the age of two as a resuslt of using Advantage which
caused a tumerous cancer to develop in his neck and which metastasized
in his brain. I sent Bayer, the maker of Advantage, a letter with
a return receipt but they never bothered to reply to my letter."

Subject: Advantix and Mood Change

From: Animal Behavior Forensic Sciences Research Laboratory

HOWEDY brian.lange, brian.la...@gmail.com wrote:

WELCOME to the world of veterinary approved poisons.


Naaah? The E***PERTS tell us that's GOOD for dogs.


Yeah. Most of the DOG LOVERS here got DEATHLY ILL and
DEAD DOGS on accHOWENT of their mishandling and inapupriate
veterinary malpractices.

Have you had your dog surgically ***ually mutilated yet?

Better hurry. Oh, bye the bye, ONLY LIARS DOG ABUSERS
COWARDS and ACTIVE ACUTE CHRONIC LONG TERM
INCURABLE MENTAL CASES post here abHOWETS.


You're welcome!

HOWEDY sharon aka sharon too, veterinary malpractice
office manager, mrs. veterinary malpracticioner, liar,
dog abuser, coward, animal murderin FRAUD mental case, Sharon wrote:

Didn't she BUY the POISON from her veterinary malpracticioner?


It made her dog SICK. Doesn't THAT tell you sumpthin?


It POISONS dogs.


You'd have to be INSANE to do THAT to your own dog.

You think she should hire a lawyer?


Did you MISSPELL LAWYER?


Look up state board of veterinary medical E***AMINERS and
ASK THEM HOWE COME their licensed vet POISONED her dog.


THAT'S INSANE. And it's a LIE.


Wouldn't your office GUARANTEE the products THEY SELL???


From: Sharon
Date: Sun, Apr 30 2006 11:03 pm
Email: "Sharon" <askformya...@nospamhotmail.com>

I think it's best to think of garlic as it relates to fleas
like sprinkling sage around the edges of a kitchen to keep
ants out. The ants are still there - alive - procreating,
just like the fleas will be. Further, fleas can cause issues
with the humans in the house. It's better to ask your vet
about a product that will kill all stages of the fleas' life
cycle.

-Sharon

From: showdogbark -
Date: Sun, Apr 30 2006

Garlic is not to be used in large does in the mixture I mentioned,
the other things that are offensive to fleas is the Engevta Yeast
and the Flake yeast, some people find just using the two yeasts
enough of a flea deterrent. Powdered garlic is much easier to use
in about one teaspoon to two cups of the yeast mixture. It does
not take much and that is not logical that there is a temptation
to use more as it is not addicting, and as I mentioned it is not
the garlic alone that works it is the mixture of the yeasts along
with it.

The smell of the yeasts is not appealing to fleas. Another
method that works for many people is to take a teaspoon of
the mixture for a severe case and rub it into the dog's fur,
for as I said the fleas do not like the smell, and then after
that feed it to the dog sprinkled on it's food twice a day.

What would a vet know except something that would be
self serving to sell, yeast and garlic do not line
their pockets.

Show Dog

From: Amy Dahl
Date: Fri, Jul 2 1999 12:00 am
Email: Amy Dahl <a...@oakhillkennel.com>

I don't have directly relevant experience, but would like
to suggest the usual--get a second opinion! Especially
before electing surgery.

I once had an experience involving cataracts and a kitten
which woke me up to how block-headed a veterinary specialist
can be (of course, you have to take my word for something the
vet. ophthalmologist did not).

I had adopted two "rescued" kittens that were found at the
age of about 1 day and raised on a foster mother. They had
various health problems, did not thrive, etc. Everything
kind of went together--they were poor, so even with up-to-date
flea treatments couldn't fight off the fleas, so they were
anemic, stayed poor, etc. When it became clear that loving
care, good food, and flea treatments weren't enough I took
them to my vet (who is very good). They were four months
old and about as big as the average 5-6 week kitten.

My vet treated them with several things, of which I remember
Ivomec for ear mites and feline Program (which had just come
out), tested and vaccinated for feline AIDS, which I had
never heard of.

The next morning, the male kitten was blind! The pupils of
his eyes were milky blue--completely clouded by cataracts.
I just happened to have an appointment to CERF a bitch, so
I took the kitten along. The vet. ophthalmologist told me,
"he's got congenital cataracts." Well, I know what congenital
means. I had already explained to her that his eyes had been
fine before taking him to the vet the previous day. She
didn't say, you're wrong, you didn't notice. She didn't
acknowledge the discrepancy between my observation and her
statement. She just repeated "they're congenital cataracts.
He's been this way since birth." She informed me about the
surgery and the cost--$1600 per eye at that time.

Twilight Zone theme here. I don't know about the rest of you,
but when face with this level of adamant assertion, I question
what I know. I was sure he'd been able to jump and climb, that
the bumping into things and crying was new that morning. When
I got home I called my vet to verify that the cat had been able
to see the previous day.

Because my vet had a couple of emergencies that day (Friday)
I didn't have the kitten put down. Lo and behold, by Monday
his pupils seemed to respond to light and he wasn't bumping
into things any more! The cloudiness gradually faded away
to nothing (to my unpracticed eye).

Then the next month I treated him with Program again and the
cataracts came back--not as severe, but this time they left
him with permanent cloudiness in one eye. My vet called her
ophthalmology professor from vet school and he mentioned the
possibility of "toxic cataracts," certainly not recorded as
a consequence of Program, but some medical treatments
(antibiotics, I think) cause cataracts in animals which are
in poor health--and sometimes these cataracts resolve.

I take the moral of this story to be that, just because
you are talking to a veterinary specialist, doesn't mean
they necessarily know what they're talking about.

--
Amy Frost Dahl Retriever Trainin phone: (910) 295-6710
Oak Hill Kennel & Handling email: a...@oakhillkennel.com
Pinehurst, NC 28370 (http://www.oakhillkennel.com)

Subject: Warning Revolution Heartworm Med

From: LUVAPOOCH
Date: Sat, Apr 8 2000 3:00 am
Email: luvapo...@aol.com (LUVAPOOCH)

Kelly Cruzan On 3/15/00 wrote:

I asked my Vet for a Heartworm preventive for my 2 year
old Australian Shepherd, Sage. They recommended Revolution.
It was applied on 3/15/00. On 3/20/00 Sage developed a cough,
but she was otherwise fine.

She had had a bath at the Vet on 3/15/00 also, so I decided
to watch her for further symptoms. On 3/23/00 she was fine
until late afternoon when she became quiet and didn't want
to play.

By 7pm that night, she had trouble opening her left eye and
whimpered when she jumped down from the couch or bed. In
the past, Sage always had a tendency to bruise easily.

She had sensitive skin and worry an area until it bruised.
She had no trouble with her blood clotting and had been
previously spayed.

She now had bruising on her body. When I took her to the
Vet, he asked if she had been in rat poison. I informed
him that she was an inside dog and only went out to play
with the kids and to use the bathroom. My neighbors have
pets and do not put out poisons. They also asked if she
had had a blow to the head because there was blood in the
whites of her eyes that was not there yesterday.

I stated that she was not hit in the head. I asked if it
could be the Revolution and was informed that it could not
be. I told my vet that was the only thing that Sage had
been exposed to.

He did a CBC and her platelets were 87 and WBC count was
27,000. her Hct was 37. He treated her for infection and
rat poisoning and sent us home.

Within 3 hours she was falling over. I rushed her back
to the Vet and he kept her until 5pm that afternoon. I
brought her home after they said she was doing better.

At 6pm she was again falling over and I called my Vet back
and was informed to bring her back the next day. By 11pm,
she was bleeding from her nose and had vomited with streaks
of bright red blood. My husband and I drove her to an ER
clinic in Savannah, GA and was told that it was either a tick
born disease or rat poisoning or a blow to the head.

I again asked if could be the Revolution and was informed no.

They kept her and treated her as my vet. When I called at
6am, I was informed that she was having seizures but she was
otherwise stable. I was worried about a subdural hematoma
and talked with my Vet.

He suggested I take Sage to Charleston, SC to see a Specialist.
She arrived there at 4:30pm. When I gave her history, I again
asked if it could be the Revolution and was informed no. Later
that night Sage continued to have seizures and she bled into the
orbits of her eyes, but they said their was still hope.

At 6:45am they called and said Sage had arrested and
was on a ventilator. We asked that they let her go.
This has been devastating to my family.

We loved that dog. She was a family member. At 10am, the
clinic called and asked for an autopsy. They informed me
that another dog had died last month there, with symptoms
the same as Sage. The dog was an inside dog and the only
thing different was that the owner had started Revolution.

The dog died of low platelets and intracrannial
hemorrhage just like Sage.

The vet in Charleston called the Revolution people and
they are paying for Sages autopsy. They also paid for
the other dogs autopsy. That autopsy showed low platelets
and intracrannial hemorrhage from a toxin. (? Revolution
was the only toxin the owners had given).

I will not know the results of the autopsy for a month,
but I believe it was the Revolution. If 2 dogs have died
in the Savannah-Charleston area in the last month, how
many nation wide.

Please spread the word for owners to be careful about
using this drug on their dogs. No dog should suffer
like my Sage suffered.

Thanks for Listening,
Terri Eddy
Rincon, GA


HOWEDY jst, jst wrote:

Allergies are a result of compromised auto-immune
system. Auto-immune systems are COMPROMISED by STRESS,
insufficient diet, and TOXINS. ALL commercial dog food
is GARBAGE.

sharon is a veterinary malpractice office manager and
mrs. veterinary malpracticioner and proven lyin dog
abusing punk thug coward active acute chronic long
term incurable mental case.

She SELLS toxins and prescription garbage diets for her
livin when she ain't SELLIN MUTILATIONS and MURDERIN dogs
and comfortin their owners while acceptin their payments.
Shell fleece you as fast as her own veterinary malpractice customers..

From: Nell71 - view profile
Date: Sat, Mar 4 2006 10:03 pm
Email: Nell71 <Nell71.246...@dogbanter.com>
Groups: rec.pets.dogs.health
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My dog has died and I was hoping if I give you the details that you
could shed some light on what could have happened to her. The vet
didn't know and we couldn't face an autopsy. We have talk to a few
professionals who deny Frontline could have been the prbolem.
At 5pm on Monday night, Frontline Plus was applied as per instructions.
By about 6.30-7pm she was showing signs of disorientation, looking
vague
(I would call her and she stared blankly at me), fatigue, panting
heavily, a little drool, excessive thirst. No vomiting but a 'hack' a
couple of times. No diarrheoa. No bleeding that we could see.
We phoned 24 hour local vet who said it couldn't be the Frontline so
she would be ok.
We watched her over night, but by morning still very thirsty, fatigued,
vague. Called our vet who said if she was still the same later that day
to bring her in.
My partner was finally able to get off work to check on her at 4pm that
day on the Tuesday.
Temperatures outside were 38c and he found her sitting by the pool gate
(we always left the doors open so she could have stayed inside in the
cool), panting heavily, glassy eyed, drooling, a little foamy in
corners of mouth, tongue blueish under and white on top, gums whiteish.
He got her into the car, by the time he reached the vet 5 minutes away
she was limp. The vet gave her 2 adrenalin shots and got her heart
going again but she died.
If it is any help with diagnosing, she has always been a little
'simple'. We lovingly said she was our down syndrome dog as she hung
her head to the left from birth with her tongue hanging out the left
side of her mouth. She was always a little left sided when walking etc.

She would run and get the ball and drop it straight away then run to
you with nothing. She would growl when you hugged her and we have never
hurt her for her to be aggressive. We have been told maybe she had a
neurological disorder, does it sound like it to you?
We have Rhubarb in our pool area but don't think she ate any although
this is toxic.
We get poisoned dead rats in the pool area (from other people, we don't
use snail pellets or rat poison ourselves) and found one there the day
after but it wasn't undisturbed, could a 'lick' have killed her?)
Frankly we blame ourselves as it seems too coincidental for it to be
anything but the Frontline Plus.
What do you think the symptoms show?
Any past experiences, thoughts are appreciated,
Thanks in advance

--
Nell71

That's too bad Nell71. The Freakin Simply Amazing
Puppy Wizard will PREY for him <{): ~ ( >

Could be. The DOG LOVERS you're askin here abHOWETS got
very long posted case histories of hurtin intimidatin an
murderin innocent defenseless dumb critters through
TRADITIONAL abuse mishandling and veterinary care and
malpractice <{): ~ ( >
DECENT PEOPLE DO NOT POST HERE abHOWETS <{) : ~ ( > ---------

"Crazy"? You want CRAZY? The only people who've replied
to you thus far are INSANE LYIN DOG ABUSING COWARDS with
very long verifiable posted case histories of THE SAME
PROBEM your dog got with NO CURE or solutions.

HOWEDY sharon aka sharon too veterinary malpractice office
manager and mrs. veterinary malpracticioner, Sharon wrote:

Sez you sharon too? You've got a very long posted
case history of hurtin intimdiatin mutilatin and
murderin innocent defenseless dumb critters an lyin
abHOWET it <{): ~ ( >


Perhaps is shouldn't be applied to dogs either?

You think the SALES REP is gonna tell you the truth?
Perhaps you just fell HOWETA a cabbage truck an landed on your head?


You'll find PLENTY of alternatives to TOXINS in Dr. Pitcairn's
books on Natural Pet Care. HOWEver, HOWER DOG LOVERS PREFER to
buy toxins from their TRUSTED veterinary malpracticioners
like we got RIGHT HERE whom The Freakin Simply Amazing Puppy
Wizard has IDENTIFIED E***POSED and DISCREDITED as bein LIARS
DOG ABUSERS FRAUDS and MALPRACTICIONERS <{): ~ ( >


Subject: Warning Revolution Heartworm Med

From: LUVAPOOCH
Date: Sat, Apr 8 2000 3:00 am
Email: luvapo...@aol.com (LUVAPOOCH)

Kelly Cruzan On 3/15/00 wrote:

I asked my Vet for a Heartworm preventive for my 2 year
old Australian Shepherd, Sage. They recommended Revolution.
It was applied on 3/15/00. On 3/20/00 Sage developed a cough,
but she was otherwise fine.

She had had a bath at the Vet on 3/15/00 also, so I decided
to watch her for further symptoms. On 3/23/00 she was fine
until late afternoon when she became quiet and didn't want
to play.

By 7pm that night, she had trouble opening her left eye and
whimpered when she jumped down from the couch or bed. In
the past, Sage always had a tendency to bruise easily.

She had sensitive skin and worry an area until it bruised.
She had no trouble with her blood clotting and had been
previously spayed.

She now had bruising on her body. When I took her to the
Vet, he asked if she had been in rat poison. I informed
him that she was an inside dog and only went out to play
with the kids and to use the bathroom. My neighbors have
pets and do not put out poisons. They also asked if she
had had a blow to the head because there was blood in the
whites of her eyes that was not there yesterday.

I stated that she was not hit in the head. I asked if it
could be the Revolution and was informed that it could not
be. I told my vet that was the only thing that Sage had
been exposed to.

He did a CBC and her platelets were 87 and WBC count was
27,000. her Hct was 37. He treated her for infection and
rat poisoning and sent us home.

Within 3 hours she was falling over. I rushed her back
to the Vet and he kept her until 5pm that afternoon. I
brought her home after they said she was doing better.

At 6pm she was again falling over and I called my Vet back
and was informed to bring her back the next day. By 11pm,
she was bleeding from her nose and had vomited with streaks
of bright red blood. My husband and I drove her to an ER
clinic in Savannah, GA and was told that it was either a tick
born disease or rat poisoning or a blow to the head.

I again asked if could be the Revolution and was informed no.

They kept her and treated her as my vet. When I called at
6am, I was informed that she was having seizures but she was
otherwise stable. I was worried about a subdural hematoma
and talked with my Vet.

He suggested I take Sage to Charleston, SC to see a Specialist.
She arrived there at 4:30pm. When I gave her history, I again
asked if it could be the Revolution and was informed no. Later
that night Sage continued to have seizures and she bled into the
orbits of her eyes, but they said their was still hope.

At 6:45am they called and said Sage had arrested and
was on a ventilator. We asked that they let her go.
This has been devastating to my family.

We loved that dog. She was a family member. At 10am, the
clinic called and asked for an autopsy. They informed me
that another dog had died last month there, with symptoms
the same as Sage. The dog was an inside dog and the only
thing different was that the owner had started Revolution.

The dog died of low platelets and intracrannial
hemorrhage just like Sage.

The vet in Charleston called the Revolution people and
they are paying for Sages autopsy. They also paid for
the other dogs autopsy. That autopsy showed low platelets
and intracrannial hemorrhage from a toxin. (? Revolution
was the only toxin the owners had given).

I will not know the results of the autopsy for a month,
but I believe it was the Revolution. If 2 dogs have died
in the Savannah-Charleston area in the last month, how
many nation wide.

Please spread the word for owners to be careful about
using this drug on their dogs. No dog should suffer
like my Sage suffered.

Thanks for Listening,
Terri Eddy
Rincon, GA

* A friend used Advantage on his dog who got sick from it.
He stopped using it and the dog recovered.

Reply Posted: on 2005-10-19

I have been going thru the same kind of problem with my Yorkie.
He is also on the Advantage flea protection. I am beginning to
wonder if this is a reaction to that medication.

If anyone else has this type of problem I would like to know.
I have been feeding him a hypo-allergenic type of dog food
with venison and potato as the main ingredients and just got
a capsul from my vet to put on the food for dry skin.

Any help or suggestions would be appreciated.


Reply Posted: on 2005-10-19

that is interesting that you are wondering if it has anything
to do with the advantage. the last time i bought advantage, i
purchased the one for dogs 20-50 pounds. i know it is the same
formula but i always wondered if it was too much for their little
bodies since they only weigh about 20-25 pounds. it was after that
when i noticed the dogs itching excessively.

Flea Control - Cats

Just a little warning for all you cat owners out there. I work
at a veterinary clinic and have done so for the past 15 years.

We had a cat come in last week that had a severe reaction to
Advantage-Multi being applied wrong by the owner. It is very
important to apply the medication at the base of the skull.

Not between the shoulder blades like other flea control products
like Revolution. Because the owners applied the Advantage at a
lower point the cat was able to turn around and lick the area and
Advantage Multi is not meant to be orally consumed.

The cat presented to the clinic with the following clinical signs:
fever, tachycardia, unable to walk and vomiting. We placed the cat
on IV fluids, started some medications and general nursing care and
the cat made a full recovery but if the owners had not noticed what
was happening with their pet they may have lost her.

Program - side effects?

Q: I have a 12 year old (18 lbs. Schnauzer) and a 3 year old (75 lbs.
collie) - The collie is presently on heartworm medication and
hypothyroid medication (2 pills daily - .05mm each)- the collie is
prone to seizures approximately every 8-9 weeks, we believe from the
hypothyroidism.

Will putting the collie on The Program flea control pill monthly
cause any reaction or side effects with the other medications the
dog is on? Would it be safe?

And the 12 year old is on no medications but on a special diet due
to fatty stones just surgically removed.

I want my animals safe and I don't like giving them medications
unless absolutely necessary. Frontline flea control was expensive
and did not work for my animals last flea season. Topical treatments
are just not enough and I am suspicious that some of the flea bombs
and dips that I have used in the past may have been toxic enough to
have caused these seizures in my collie.

The seizures have only been noticable since January of this year.

Thank you for your time.

Please respond. RJ in Pennsylvania

A: RJ - There is no evidence that I am aware of that Program (Rx)
will induce or facilitate seizures. It should be safe to use in
this situation and does not interact with the medications listed.

It is always hard to figure out what is causing seizures and many
times it is impossible to do so.

That leaves a lot of room for guessing at causes. It is probably
unlikely that previous insecticide use is the cause of the seizures
but it is probably possible. Hypothyroidism has been implicated
as a cause of seizures but it is probably not a common cause, either.

Supplementation of thyroid hormone should reduce the incidence
of seizures if hypothyroidism is the underlying cause.

Advantage - skin reaction possible

Q: We have a 7 month old golden who has dermatitis on the back of
the neck. The area affected is about 6" diameter. We are treating
with Cephalexin antibiotic and Gentocin topical spray.

My question regards the source of the infection. This location
matches the position where we apply Advantage flea control
(Imadacloprid).

I have been unable to find information regarding side affects of
this flea control. Can it act as a skin irritant that would lead
to infection? Would you discontinue this flea control?

A: Tom- I have seen some anecdotal reports of reactions to Advantage
(Rx) at the site it is put on. While this is a relatively minor problem
as reactions to medications go there is still no reason to use it if it

causes problems.

It is possible to use Frontline (Rx) or Program (Rx) as alternatives
for flea control. I would not give up on flea control entirely over
a reaction to one medication.

Mike Richards, DVM


The topical version (vs. the spray version) of Frontline (Rx) has
been more successful on long haired breeds such as collies, for us.
If Program does not control the fleas you might consider trying this -
or using both Program and Frontline or Advantage (Rx).

I hope that the seizures do diminish as time goes on.

Mike Richards, DVM

Gave her a dose of Revolution, hoping to prevent mange, and she went
into a shaking fit and wouldn't get up for hours. (Anyone want to buy
some Revolution cheap? I have 5 vials left.).


2 months ago, I ran out of the Revolution, and had a few extra
Advantage vials left over that I hadn't used yet, the date was
still good, and since a full month had passed, I saw no reason
why I couldn't apply the Advantage to the sheepies.

Annabelle had no reaction, but Jack lost a patch of hair the size
of a 3 inch circle in diameter, and the area turned red and raw.
I assume it was a reaction to the Advantage, it healed quickly
and the hair has grown back. I won't try that again though.

Rolling Eyes
  Reply With Quote
8 11th March 11:40
human_and_animal_behavior_forensic_sciences_research_laboratory@hotmail.com
External User
 
Posts: 1
Default Bichon Skin Problems


HOWEDY GinaL,


They're called STRESS INDUCED AUTO-IMMUNE DIS-EASE aka The Puppy
Wizard's Syndrome <{) : ~ ( >


Right. The symptoms vary from benign tumors to allergys to chronic ear
and
urinary tract infections cushings and addisons DIS-EASE diabetes,
blindness,
seizurs, cancers, even dental and crippling ligament DIS-EASE <{) : ~ (


Right. HOWEver, the SYNDROME IS CHRONIC and DEATHLY <{) : ~ ( >


RIGHT. HOWEver, it's a SYMPTOM of a CHRONIC DEATHLY CONDITION.

And you can BUY THAT from your VETERINARIAN?


Can you likeWIZE BUY THAT from your VETERINARIAN?


THAT'S INSANE:

http://www.shirleys-wellness-cafe.com/petallergies.htm
has LOTS MOORE INFORMATION and well worth readin.

Here's a few E***CERPTS:

Flea Control Products and Their Hazards

Many flea control pesticides have significant hazards. In Table
1 we have outlined the effects of twenty ingredients in flea
control products. The chart uses data from published studies, as
well as information from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
(EPA) and other government agencies. (Complete references are given
on page 10.)

The chart is dense and not easy to read, but the stark conclusions
from studying the chart are straightforward. In general, flea control
insecticides are a hazardous group. Over two-thirds of the chemicals
in the table are neurotoxic, and almost that many have caused
reproductive
problems in laboratory tests.

Half of the chemicals are classified as carcinogens by EPA, or have
been associated with increased cancer risks in epidemiological or
laboratory studies. A quarter of them are known to cause genetic
damage in at least one test. Almost all have environmental concerns.

If you are considering the use of a flea pesticide, please carefully
read the section of the chart about that chemical before you make
your decision. If you would like more detailed information about
any of the chemicals, contact NCAP.

Jeffrey Levy, DVM - "Have you ever wondered why some dogs
and cats have severe flea problems, while others are hardly
bothered by the little pests? Fleas can be viewed as an
indicator of an animal's general health. Parasites in general,
and fleas in particular, are most attracted to the weak,
unhealthy, or very young animal whose immune system is not
functioning well. The long-term solution to a flea problem
is to reduce your pet's susceptibility to fleas by improving
his/her health."

Allergies can be, and often are, unrecognized deficiency diseases.
Recognizing
nutritional deficiencies will save you a great deal of frustration and
allow you to
make the necessary adjustments in your dog's diet.

Do You Really Know What's In Your Pet's Food? by Dr. Jane Bicks
DVM and Toxic Pet Food

Doctors tell you that steroids (cortisone, prednisone) only cause
side effects after many years. But new research shows that permanent
damage is immediate and devastating. Studies show that steroids cause
permanent, debilitating effects after a single dosage.

"Steroids are probably the most sleazy of modern day medications"
says John Mills, former professor of medicine at the University of
California, San Francisco and chief of infectious diseases at San
Francisco General Hospital more on the danger of steroids

People that have pets with skin problems, allergies, stomach
problems and behavioral problems spend hundreds of dollars at the
vet on antibiotics, steroids, tranquilizers, and other medication.
Antibiotics, steroids, and many other medications take a serious
toll on the internal organs and immune systems of our pets.

It becomes a never-ending circle of medication and sickness. Skin
problems and allergies are often symptoms of nutritional deficiency
and toxic overload.

* Naturopathic principles for animals suffering from allergies
Do no harm. The animal's condition must not be made worse in the
long run to alleviate symptoms. Vaccines and flea and heart worm
prevention can add to the body's toxic load, which can lead to
further immune system compromise.

* Identify and eliminate the cause/s and obstacles to cure.
First, rule out skin parasites such as mites, fleas, ringworm (a
fungal infection), Leishmaniasis (for dogs from warmer climates)
and systemic diseases such hypothyroidism, Lupus, Vasculitis,
Phemphigus, etc. Identify and, if possible, avoid allergens to
give rapid relief. Look at the animal's environment when considering
allergens (pollens, plastics, nylon, wool, etc.), toxins (pesticides,
chemicals, etc.), irritants and more.

* Use the curative power of nature. By eliminating causes and
supporting organ and immune function with good diet, detoxification
and supplements, the body will heal itself.

* Prevent the condition. An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of
cure.


Cynthia Harcourt, DVM - "Allergies represent more than a
local inflammation of the skin. They reflect a constitutional
state. From a holistic standpoint, the approach to treatment
recognizes the deeper constitutional state and restores order
and balance to the whole animal."

Dr. Blanco, D.V.M - "You take healthy animals and often very
quickly after you vaccinate, you can see simple things like itching
of the skin or excessive licking of the paws, sometimes even with
no eruptions.

We see a lot of epilepsy, often after a rabies vaccination. Or
dogs or cats can become aggressive for several days. Frequently,
you'll see urinary tract infections in cats, often within three
months after their [annual] vaccination. If you step back, open
your mind and heart, you'll start to see patterns of illness
post-vaccination." more about vaccinosis

Alfred Plechner, DVM - "The most common and most visible
symptoms of nutritionally caused deficiencies are allergies of
one kind or another. Because many commercial foods are woefully
deficient in key nutrients, the long term effect of feeding such
foods makes the dog hypersensitive to its environment. . . It's
a dinosaur effect. Animals are being programmed for disaster, for
extinction.

Many of them are biochemical cripples with defective adrenal
glands unable to manufacture adequate cortisol, a hormone
vital for health and resistance to disease."

Charles E Loops DVM - "Homeopathic veterinarians and other
holistic practitioners have maintained for some time that
vaccinations do more harm than they provide benefits. Vaccinations
represent a major assault on the body's immune system.... Vaccine
induced chronic diseases range from life-threatening conditions
such as auto-immune crises to conditions destroying the quality
of life of an animal as in chronic skin allergies."

Autumn Drouin, DVM, ND "Do no harm. The animal's condition
must not be made worse in the long run to alleviate symptoms.

Vaccines and flea and heart worm prevention can add to the
body's toxic load, which can lead to further immune system
compromise.

Identify and eliminate the cause/s and obstacles to cure.

First, rule out skin parasites such as mites, fleas, ringworm
(a fungal infection), Leishmaniasis (for dogs from warmer
climates) and systemic diseases such hypothyroidism, Lupus,
Vasculitis, Phemphigus, etc. Identify and, if possible, avoid
allergens to give rapid relief. L

ook at the animal's environment when considering allergens
(pollens, plastics, nylon, wool, etc.), toxins (pesticides,
chemicals, etc.), irritants and more. Use the curative power
of nature.

By eliminating causes and supporting organ and immune function
with good diet, detoxification and supplements, the body will
heal itself. Prevent the condition. An ounce of prevention is
worth a pound of cure."

Pets are commonly afflicted with stubborn allergies that are a
source of much distress--and expense--for their owners. And, very
commonly--just as with their owners--medical interventions that
mainly focus on treating the symptoms are quite ineffective. The
findings of Glycobiology suggest that this prevailing approach may
be barking up the wrong tree, so to speak, and that a nutritional
intervention that, instead, supplies the body with crucial
micronutrients that are lacking is likely to be far more effective.
Glycobiology has now established that every cell in the mammalian body
requires eight essential saccharides molecules in order to function
effectively.

These saccharides combine with protein and fat molecules into
glycoforms that attach themselves to the surfaces of every cell
in the body. Under an electron microscope, they look like weird
trees growing on the cell surface. One of their most important
functions there is to allow cells to communicate effectively
with each other.

To the degree that these saccharides are deficient, cell-to-cell
communication tends to break down and some form of illness starts
to develop.

An insufficiency of these saccharide molecules is particularly
disastrous for the immune system, because it causes the cells
of the immune system to become, in effect, partially blind.

These cells can then become over-reactive in attacking allergens
of all kinds and even in attacking the tissues of the body; on
the other hand, ironically, they may become under-reactive in
attacking true pathogens that are serious threats to the body. --------------------


WHAT IS A MAST CELL?

A normal mast cell is part of our immunologic defense systems against
invading organisms. Mast cells are meant to participate in the war
against parasites (as opposed to the war against bacterial or viral
invaders). They are bound within tissues that interface with the
external world such as the skin, respiratory or intestinal tract. They
do not circulate through the body.


The mast cell possesses within itself granules of especially
inflammatory biochemicals meant for use against invading parasites.
(Think of these as small bombs that can be released). The mast cell has
binding sites on its surface for a special type of antibody called
"IgE." IgE is produced in response to exposure to antigens typical
of parasites (i.e. worm skin proteins, or similarly shaped proteins).
IgE antibodies find their way to a tissue mast cell and perch there.
With enough exposure to the antigen in question, the mast cell may be
covered with IgE antibodies like the fluff of a dandelion. The mast
cell is said, at this point, to be "sensitized."

The IgE antibodies are "Y" shaped. Their foot is planted in the
mast cell while their arms lift up hoping to capture their antigen.
When the antigen comes by and is grasped by the IgE antibodies, this
should indicate that a parasite is near and the mast cell, like a land
mine, degranulates releasing its toxic biochemical weapons. These
chemicals are harmful to the parasite plus serve as signals to other
immune cells that a battle is in progress and for them to come and join
in.

At least this is what is supposed to happen.

We live in a clean world without a lot of parasites. What unfortunately
tends to happen is that the IgE/mast cell system is stimulated with
other antigens that are of similar shape or size as parasitic antigens.
These "next best" antigens are usually pollen proteins and the
result is an allergy. Instead of killing the invading parasite, the
mast cell biochemicals produce local redness, itch, swelling, and other
symptoms we associate with allergic reactions.

AND THE MAST CELL TUMOR?

As if the mast cell isn't enough of a troublemaker in this regard,
the mast cell can form a tumor made of many mast cells. When this
happens, the cells of the tumor are unstable. This means they releases
their toxic granules with simple contact or even at random creating
allergic symptoms that do not correlate with exposure to any particular
antigen.

Mast cell tumors are notoriously invasive and difficult to treat.

CANINE

Mast cell tumors are especially common in dogs accounting for
approximately one skin tumor in every five. The Boxer is at an
especially high risk as are related breeds: English Bulldog, Boston
Terrier).

Boxer

English Bulldog

Boston Terrier

Also at higher than average risk are the Shar pei, Labrador Retriever,
Golden Retriever, Schnauzer, and ****er Spaniel. Most mast cell tumors
arise in the skin but technically they can arise anywhere that mast
cells are found. The mast cell tumor does not have a characteristic
appearance though because of the tumor's ability to cause swelling
through the release of granules, it is not unusual for the owner to
notice a sudden change in the size of the growth or, for that matter,
that the growth is itchy or bothersome to the patient.

Several contributing factors in the development of skin tumors include
viruses, solar and ionizing radiation, hormones, genetic influences,
vaccines, thermal injuries, and immunologic influences.

The history for an animal with a cutaneous tumor is variable. Commonly,
owners will discover a growth while examining or grooming their pets.
Benign tumors are more likely to have a history of slow growth from
weeks to years. It is not unusual for benign epithelial tumors to be
presented for ulceration due to self-trauma or secondary inflammation.
Most benign tumors are well cir***scribed, nonpainful, and freely
movable and incite a minimal inflammatory response. Malignant tumors
are often rapidly growing, fixed to underlying structures and ulcerated
and will often have ill-defined margins. Invasion into vessels and
regional lymphatics is often observed.

Sebaceous Gland Tumors

Sebaceous gland tumors represent a complex array of growths that can be
divided into four groups based on histologic appearance. These are, in
decreasing frequency, sebaceous hyperplasia, sebaceous epithelioma,
sebaceous adenoma, and sebaceous adenocarcinoma. Sebaceous gland tumors
are among the most common skin tumors in the dog, accounting for 6.8 to

7.9% of all skin tumors. Sebaceous gland tumors are less common in the
cat, accounting for 2.3 to 4.4% of all skin tumors.

Modified sebaccous glands are found in a variety of locations and may
give rise to neoplastic growths, including eyelid meibomian gland
tumors
and peri**** gland tumors .

Sebaceous hyperplasia accounts for the majority of sebaceous gland
tumors in the dog. They are characterized histologically by an
ac***ulation of nearly mature sebaceous glands. Most are solitary;
however, multiple lesions can occur. They are found on older animals
(mean 9.1 years), and miniature schnauzers, beagles, poodles, and
****er spaniels appear to be over-represented. They can occur anywhere
on the body but most are found on the limbs, trunk and eyelids.

Most are less than 1 cm in diameter, wartlike or cauliflowerlike,
and can become ulcerated because of trauma. In a compilation of 92
cases in the dog, only one recurred following excision; however,
nearly 10% of cases developed new lesions at other body sites.

Sebaceous hyperplasia is often found peripheral to and phasing into
sebaceous adenomas or adenocarcinomas and is likely a precursor to
their development. In the cat, sebaceous hyperplasia is typically a
solitary lesion more common on the head, with a male predisposition.

Lesions may be present for many years. Recurrence has not been
reported following excision.

Sebaceous epithelioma, occurs primarily on the head (especially
the eyelid) as a solitary lesion, however, generalized cases have
been reported. These lesions are nearly identical in appearance
to sebaceous hyperplasia and the treatment of choice is
They are more likely to recur than sebaceous hyperplasia or adenoma,
though the recurrence rate is still low, at approximately 6%.

Sebaceous adenomas are relatively uncommon sebaceous gland tumors,
similar in appearance and behavior to hyperplastic lesions. Sebaceous
adenocarcinomas are rare in the cat and dog and appear to have a low
potential for metastasis and recurrence. They are characterized by
ulceration and inflammation of surrounding tissues. More aggressive
surgical excision is indicated fot these tumors.

=========================

Nonmalignant Tumors of the Skin and Soft Tissues

Nonmalignant skin tumors and cysts were among the most frequently
reported health problems on the recently completed FCRSA health survey.
For example, over 14% of the Flat-Coats in the survey have had a
histiocytoma.
Lipomas and sebaceous cysts were reported in over 10%
of the dogs in the survey. Because of the time you spend grooming and
petting your dog, you are the one most likely to discover a tumor of
the skin.

The skin is composed of two layers. The outer layer, called the
epidermis
or cuticle, is several cell layers thick and has an external layer of
dead cells.
These dead cells are continually shed from the surface and replaced
from
below from a basal layer of cells. The inner layer of the skin is
called the
dermis or corium. It is composed of tissues that form a network which
includes collagen, elastic fibers, blood vessels, nerves, fat and hair
follicles.
Each of these various tissues in the skin has the potential to produce
a tumor.

The names of the various skin tumors are assigned according to the type
of the cell of origin.
The Merck Manual cautions, "Because of the diversity of cutaneous
tumors, their classification
is difficult and, for many, there is controversy as to the cell of
origin. There is also controversy
as to what criteria should be used to establish whether a lesion that
arises in the skin or soft
tissues is or is not a neoplasm, and if so, whether it is benign or
malignant."

A definitive diagnosis is possible only through histopathology
(microscopic evaluation) of a biopsy.
The surgeon's gross diagnosis is correct less than 50% of the time. The
following descriptions are
meant to give a brief, general overview of benign tumors. Your first
step, should you find a growth
on your dog's skin, is to get a diagnosis from your veterinarian.

Treatment for most benign tumors is similar. Depending on the type,
size, location and condition
of the tumor as well as the age and health of the dog, the best course
of action may be to just
monitor the growth. In cases where treatment is indicated, surgical
removal offers the best chance
of cure. As with any tumor, as complete excision of the growth as
possible is recommended.

Basal Cell Tumors are skin tumors that are generally benign and are
common in middle-aged and
older dogs. They are most frequently found on the head, neck and
shoulders. They are slow-growing.
They may become ulcerated and develop secondary bacterial infection.

Cutaneous Cysts are usually malformations of the hair follicle which
result in abnormal sac-like
structures in the skin. Surgical removal is the best treatment. These
cysts should never be squeezed
since a severe inflammatory reaction could develop.

Hemangiomas are nonmalignant growths that develop from blood vessels.
Although benign, it is i
mportant to obtain a definitive diagnosis to rule out its malignant
counterpart, hemangiosarcoma.
Hemangiomas tend to ulcerate. Again, surgical removal is recommended.

Histiocytomas are another common skin tumor. The exact cell of origin
of this tumor is unknown.

Some evidence points to a viral cause, although no specific virus has
yet been identified. Again,
this type of tumor is difficult to diagnose and it can be confused with
some malignant neoplasms.
Although benign histiocytomas can resolve spontaneously within two to
three months, the best
course of action is to have them surgically removed and biopsied.

Lipomas are quite common in older dogs. They usually appear as
slow-growing, soft, discrete,
round masses right under the skin. They are usually freely movable.
Despite their benign
characteristics, these tumors should also be removed because they can
become quite large and
impinge on surrounding tissues or impede limb movement. They are also
difficult to distinguish
from infiltrating lipomas or from malignant liposarcomas.

Sebaceous Gland Tumors are also common. They are derived from sebaceous
glands usually
attached to hair follicles in the dermal layer of the skin. The sebum
normally produced by these
glands will form the content of a sebaceous cyst. These will appear
anywhere on the body as
raised, horny growths, perhaps with an ulcerated surface. These tumors
are benign, but again
surgical removal and biopsy should be done to distinguish them from
sebaceous gland adenocarcinoma.
Complete excision is recommended to prevent recurrence.

Warts are usually caused by one of two papilloma viruses. One causes
oral papillomas which occur
on the palate, tongue and/or esophagus. The other type causes warts to
appear on the face, neck
and limbs. Warts may also be caused by some noninfectious irritants
which produce a solitary wart.

Viruses usually cause multiple warts. Younger dogs are more likely to
be affected by papilloma viruses,
but after they recover, they are usually immune to further infection.
Surgical crushing of some of the viral
warts speeds remission. Affected dogs should be isolated from other
dogs to prevent spread of the infection.
There is no danger to other species.
  Reply With Quote
9 11th March 16:12
human_and_animal_behavior_forensic_sciences_research_laboratory@hotmail.com
External User
 
Posts: 1
Default Bichon Skin Problems


HOWEDY michael,


Yeah. Perhaps you MISSED The Insanely Freakin Simply Amazing Grand
Puppy Wizard's REPLY. OR perhaps you didn't think HE was responding
to YOUR post when HE replied to the other simpleton?


That so? CuriHOWES AIN'T IT HOWE COME you OVERLOOKED The
Insanely Freakin Simply Amazing Grand Puppy Wizard's REPLY seein
as it COVERED ALL THEM ISSUES, michael?


You mean your veterinary MALPRACTICIONER, michael.


Naaaah? THOWESANDS??? JUST LIKE THAT, hunh???


Naaaaah? JUST LIKE THAT, hunh???

Naaaaah? DO TELL???

Oh? YOU MEAN LIKE HOWE The Insanely Simply Freakin
Simply Amazing Grand Puppy Wizard TOLD YOU??? BEWEEEAHAHAHAHAHAHHAAHAAA!!!


Naaah? JUST LIKE THAT, hunh???


Naaaaah??? DO TELL???

Hey michael? Does your vet GOT TESTS FOR THAT??? BWEEEEAAAAHAHAHAHHAHAAAAA!!!

Oh? And can you BUY THAT from YOUR VETERINARY MALPRACTICIONER?

Naaah? DO TELL???


Advantage Flea product: how safe or how toxic is it?

* Here is a testimonial from a distraught cat owner
"Used Advantage on my cat and shes sick"

* Mary Ann lost her beloved bearded collie 'Kaimen' as a
result of using Advantage Flea Drops. "Advantage flea drops were
recomended by my veteranarian to control Kaimens flea problems.

The drops were placed on the back of his head in the nape of the
neck. After using Advantage for 13 months a growth the size of a
golf ball emerged in that very same spot where the Advantage flea
drop were placed.

The growth was made of a grey colored flesh with a putrid odor.

A purulent putrid liquid oozed out of it. Kaimen was taking to the
vet, where I learned more about the growth and just how deadly
Advantage is to our pets. The pesticide that is used in Advantage
is called lmidacloprid and should NOT be absorbed through the skin.

I learned that dogs and rats who were used to test this pesticide
developped thyroid cancer and it affected their appetite. My dog
Kaimen died at the age of two as a resuslt of using Advantage which
caused a tumerous cancer to develop in his neck and which metastasized
in his brain. I sent Bayer, the maker of Advantage, a letter with
a return receipt but they never bothered to reply to my letter."

Subject: Advantix and Mood Change

From: Animal Behavior Forensic Sciences Research Laboratory

HOWEDY brian.lange, brian.la...@gmail.com wrote:

WELCOME to the world of veterinary approved poisons.


Naaah? The E***PERTS tell us that's GOOD for dogs.


Yeah. Most of the DOG LOVERS here got DEATHLY ILL and
DEAD DOGS on accHOWENT of their mishandling and inapupriate
veterinary malpractices.

Have you had your dog surgically ***ually mutilated yet?

Better hurry. Oh, bye the bye, ONLY LIARS DOG ABUSERS
COWARDS and ACTIVE ACUTE CHRONIC LONG TERM
INCURABLE MENTAL CASES post here abHOWETS.


You're welcome!

HOWEDY sharon aka sharon too, veterinary malpractice
office manager, mrs. veterinary malpracticioner, liar,
dog abuser, coward, animal murderin FRAUD mental case, Sharon wrote:

Didn't she BUY the POISON from her veterinary malpracticioner?


It made her dog SICK. Doesn't THAT tell you sumpthin?


It POISONS dogs.


You'd have to be INSANE to do THAT to your own dog.

You think she should hire a lawyer?


Did you MISSPELL LAWYER?


Look up state board of veterinary medical E***AMINERS and
ASK THEM HOWE COME their licensed vet POISONED her dog.


THAT'S INSANE. And it's a LIE.


Wouldn't your office GUARANTEE the products THEY SELL???


From: Sharon
Date: Sun, Apr 30 2006 11:03 pm
Email: "Sharon" <askformya...@nospamhotmail.com>

I think it's best to think of garlic as it relates to fleas
like sprinkling sage around the edges of a kitchen to keep
ants out. The ants are still there - alive - procreating,
just like the fleas will be. Further, fleas can cause issues
with the humans in the house. It's better to ask your vet
about a product that will kill all stages of the fleas' life
cycle.

-Sharon

From: showdogbark -
Date: Sun, Apr 30 2006

Garlic is not to be used in large does in the mixture I mentioned,
the other things that are offensive to fleas is the Engevta Yeast
and the Flake yeast, some people find just using the two yeasts
enough of a flea deterrent. Powdered garlic is much easier to use
in about one teaspoon to two cups of the yeast mixture. It does
not take much and that is not logical that there is a temptation
to use more as it is not addicting, and as I mentioned it is not
the garlic alone that works it is the mixture of the yeasts along
with it.

The smell of the yeasts is not appealing to fleas. Another
method that works for many people is to take a teaspoon of
the mixture for a severe case and rub it into the dog's fur,
for as I said the fleas do not like the smell, and then after
that feed it to the dog sprinkled on it's food twice a day.

What would a vet know except something that would be
self serving to sell, yeast and garlic do not line
their pockets.

Show Dog

From: Amy Dahl
Date: Fri, Jul 2 1999 12:00 am
Email: Amy Dahl <a...@oakhillkennel.com>

I don't have directly relevant experience, but would like
to suggest the usual--get a second opinion! Especially
before electing surgery.

I once had an experience involving cataracts and a kitten
which woke me up to how block-headed a veterinary specialist
can be (of course, you have to take my word for something the
vet. ophthalmologist did not).

I had adopted two "rescued" kittens that were found at the
age of about 1 day and raised on a foster mother. They had
various health problems, did not thrive, etc. Everything
kind of went together--they were poor, so even with up-to-date
flea treatments couldn't fight off the fleas, so they were
anemic, stayed poor, etc. When it became clear that loving
care, good food, and flea treatments weren't enough I took
them to my vet (who is very good). They were four months
old and about as big as the average 5-6 week kitten.

My vet treated them with several things, of which I remember
Ivomec for ear mites and feline Program (which had just come
out), tested and vaccinated for feline AIDS, which I had
never heard of.

The next morning, the male kitten was blind! The pupils of
his eyes were milky blue--completely clouded by cataracts.
I just happened to have an appointment to CERF a bitch, so
I took the kitten along. The vet. ophthalmologist told me,
"he's got congenital cataracts." Well, I know what congenital
means. I had already explained to her that his eyes had been
fine before taking him to the vet the previous day. She
didn't say, you're wrong, you didn't notice. She didn't
acknowledge the discrepancy between my observation and her
statement. She just repeated "they're congenital cataracts.
He's been this way since birth." She informed me about the
surgery and the cost--$1600 per eye at that time.

Twilight Zone theme here. I don't know about the rest of you,
but when face with this level of adamant assertion, I question
what I know. I was sure he'd been able to jump and climb, that
the bumping into things and crying was new that morning. When
I got home I called my vet to verify that the cat had been able
to see the previous day.

Because my vet had a couple of emergencies that day (Friday)
I didn't have the kitten put down. Lo and behold, by Monday
his pupils seemed to respond to light and he wasn't bumping
into things any more! The cloudiness gradually faded away
to nothing (to my unpracticed eye).

Then the next month I treated him with Program again and the
cataracts came back--not as severe, but this time they left
him with permanent cloudiness in one eye. My vet called her
ophthalmology professor from vet school and he mentioned the
possibility of "toxic cataracts," certainly not recorded as
a consequence of Program, but some medical treatments
(antibiotics, I think) cause cataracts in animals which are
in poor health--and sometimes these cataracts resolve.

I take the moral of this story to be that, just because
you are talking to a veterinary specialist, doesn't mean
they necessarily know what they're talking about.

--
Amy Frost Dahl Retriever Trainin phone: (910) 295-6710
Oak Hill Kennel & Handling email: a...@oakhillkennel.com
Pinehurst, NC 28370 (http://www.oakhillkennel.com)

Subject: Warning Revolution Heartworm Med

From: LUVAPOOCH
Date: Sat, Apr 8 2000 3:00 am
Email: luvapo...@aol.com (LUVAPOOCH)

Kelly Cruzan On 3/15/00 wrote:

I asked my Vet for a Heartworm preventive for my 2 year
old Australian Shepherd, Sage. They recommended Revolution.
It was applied on 3/15/00. On 3/20/00 Sage developed a cough,
but she was otherwise fine.

She had had a bath at the Vet on 3/15/00 also, so I decided
to watch her for further symptoms. On 3/23/00 she was fine
until late afternoon when she became quiet and didn't want
to play.

By 7pm that night, she had trouble opening her left eye and
whimpered when she jumped down from the couch or bed. In
the past, Sage always had a tendency to bruise easily.

She had sensitive skin and worry an area until it bruised.
She had no trouble with her blood clotting and had been
previously spayed.

She now had bruising on her body. When I took her to the
Vet, he asked if she had been in rat poison. I informed
him that she was an inside dog and only went out to play
with the kids and to use the bathroom. My neighbors have
pets and do not put out poisons. They also asked if she
had had a blow to the head because there was blood in the
whites of her eyes that was not there yesterday.

I stated that she was not hit in the head. I asked if it
could be the Revolution and was informed that it could not
be. I told my vet that was the only thing that Sage had
been exposed to.

He did a CBC and her platelets were 87 and WBC count was
27,000. her Hct was 37. He treated her for infection and
rat poisoning and sent us home.

Within 3 hours she was falling over. I rushed her back
to the Vet and he kept her until 5pm that afternoon. I
brought her home after they said she was doing better.

At 6pm she was again falling over and I called my Vet back
and was informed to bring her back the next day. By 11pm,
she was bleeding from her nose and had vomited with streaks
of bright red blood. My husband and I drove her to an ER
clinic in Savannah, GA and was told that it was either a tick
born disease or rat poisoning or a blow to the head.

I again asked if could be the Revolution and was informed no.

They kept her and treated her as my vet. When I called at
6am, I was informed that she was having seizures but she was
otherwise stable. I was worried about a subdural hematoma
and talked with my Vet.

He suggested I take Sage to Charleston, SC to see a Specialist.
She arrived there at 4:30pm. When I gave her history, I again
asked if it could be the Revolution and was informed no. Later
that night Sage continued to have seizures and she bled into the
orbits of her eyes, but they said their was still hope.

At 6:45am they called and said Sage had arrested and
was on a ventilator. We asked that they let her go.
This has been devastating to my family.

We loved that dog. She was a family member. At 10am, the
clinic called and asked for an autopsy. They informed me
that another dog had died last month there, with symptoms
the same as Sage. The dog was an inside dog and the only
thing different was that the owner had started Revolution.

The dog died of low platelets and intracrannial
hemorrhage just like Sage.

The vet in Charleston called the Revolution people and
they are paying for Sages autopsy. They also paid for
the other dogs autopsy. That autopsy showed low platelets
and intracrannial hemorrhage from a toxin. (? Revolution
was the only toxin the owners had given).

I will not know the results of the autopsy for a month,
but I believe it was the Revolution. If 2 dogs have died
in the Savannah-Charleston area in the last month, how
many nation wide.

Please spread the word for owners to be careful about
using this drug on their dogs. No dog should suffer
like my Sage suffered.

Thanks for Listening,
Terri Eddy
Rincon, GA


HOWEDY jst, jst wrote:

Allergies are a result of compromised auto-immune
system. Auto-immune systems are COMPROMISED by STRESS,
insufficient diet, and TOXINS. ALL commercial dog food
is GARBAGE.

sharon is a veterinary malpractice office manager and
mrs. veterinary malpracticioner and proven lyin dog
abusing punk thug coward active acute chronic long
term incurable mental case.

She SELLS toxins and prescription garbage diets for her
livin when she ain't SELLIN MUTILATIONS and MURDERIN dogs
and comfortin their owners while acceptin their payments.
Shell fleece you as fast as her own veterinary malpractice customers..

From: Nell71 - view profile
Date: Sat, Mar 4 2006 10:03 pm
Email: Nell71 <Nell71.246...@dogbanter.com>
Groups: rec.pets.dogs.health
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My dog has died and I was hoping if I give you the details that you
could shed some light on what could have happened to her. The vet
didn't know and we couldn't face an autopsy. We have talk to a few
professionals who deny Frontline could have been the prbolem.
At 5pm on Monday night, Frontline Plus was applied as per instructions.
By about 6.30-7pm she was showing signs of disorientation, looking
vague
(I would call her and she stared blankly at me), fatigue, panting
heavily, a little drool, excessive thirst. No vomiting but a 'hack' a
couple of times. No diarrheoa. No bleeding that we could see.
We phoned 24 hour local vet who said it couldn't be the Frontline so
she would be ok.
We watched her over night, but by morning still very thirsty, fatigued,
vague. Called our vet who said if she was still the same later that day
to bring her in.
My partner was finally able to get off work to check on her at 4pm that
day on the Tuesday.
Temperatures outside were 38c and he found her sitting by the pool gate
(we always left the doors open so she could have stayed inside in the
cool), panting heavily, glassy eyed, drooling, a little foamy in
corners of mouth, tongue blueish under and white on top, gums whiteish.
He got her into the car, by the time he reached the vet 5 minutes away
she was limp. The vet gave her 2 adrenalin shots and got her heart
going again but she died.
If it is any help with diagnosing, she has always been a little
'simple'. We lovingly said she was our down syndrome dog as she hung
her head to the left from birth with her tongue hanging out the left
side of her mouth. She was always a little left sided when walking etc.

She would run and get the ball and drop it straight away then run to
you with nothing. She would growl when you hugged her and we have never
hurt her for her to be aggressive. We have been told maybe she had a
neurological disorder, does it sound like it to you?
We have Rhubarb in our pool area but don't think she ate any although
this is toxic.
We get poisoned dead rats in the pool area (from other people, we don't
use snail pellets or rat poison ourselves) and found one there the day
after but it wasn't undisturbed, could a 'lick' have killed her?)
Frankly we blame ourselves as it seems too coincidental for it to be
anything but the Frontline Plus.
What do you think the symptoms show?
Any past experiences, thoughts are appreciated,
Thanks in advance

--
Nell71

That's too bad Nell71. The Freakin Simply Amazing
Puppy Wizard will PREY for him <{): ~ ( >

Could be. The DOG LOVERS you're askin here abHOWETS got
very long posted case histories of hurtin intimidatin an
murderin innocent defenseless dumb critters through
TRADITIONAL abuse mishandling and veterinary care and
malpractice <{): ~ ( >
DECENT PEOPLE DO NOT POST HERE abHOWETS <{) : ~ ( > ---------

"Crazy"? You want CRAZY? The only people who've replied
to you thus far are INSANE LYIN DOG ABUSING COWARDS with
very long verifiable posted case histories of THE SAME
PROBEM your dog got with NO CURE or solutions.

HOWEDY sharon aka sharon too veterinary malpractice office
manager and mrs. veterinary malpracticioner, Sharon wrote:

Sez you sharon too? You've got a very long posted
case history of hurtin intimdiatin mutilatin and
murderin innocent defenseless dumb critters an lyin
abHOWET it <{): ~ ( >


Perhaps is shouldn't be applied to dogs either?

You think the SALES REP is gonna tell you the truth?
Perhaps you just fell HOWETA a cabbage truck an landed on your head?


You'll find PLENTY of alternatives to TOXINS in Dr. Pitcairn's
books on Natural Pet Care. HOWEver, HOWER DOG LOVERS PREFER to
buy toxins from their TRUSTED veterinary malpracticioners
like we got RIGHT HERE whom The Freakin Simply Amazing Puppy
Wizard has IDENTIFIED E***POSED and DISCREDITED as bein LIARS
DOG ABUSERS FRAUDS and MALPRACTICIONERS <{): ~ ( >


Subject: Warning Revolution Heartworm Med

From: LUVAPOOCH
Date: Sat, Apr 8 2000 3:00 am
Email: luvapo...@aol.com (LUVAPOOCH)

Kelly Cruzan On 3/15/00 wrote:

I asked my Vet for a Heartworm preventive for my 2 year
old Australian Shepherd, Sage. They recommended Revolution.
It was applied on 3/15/00. On 3/20/00 Sage developed a cough,
but she was otherwise fine.

She had had a bath at the Vet on 3/15/00 also, so I decided
to watch her for further symptoms. On 3/23/00 she was fine
until late afternoon when she became quiet and didn't want
to play.

By 7pm that night, she had trouble opening her left eye and
whimpered when she jumped down from the couch or bed. In
the past, Sage always had a tendency to bruise easily.

She had sensitive skin and worry an area until it bruised.
She had no trouble with her blood clotting and had been
previously spayed.

She now had bruising on her body. When I took her to the
Vet, he asked if she had been in rat poison. I informed
him that she was an inside dog and only went out to play
with the kids and to use the bathroom. My neighbors have
pets and do not put out poisons. They also asked if she
had had a blow to the head because there was blood in the
whites of her eyes that was not there yesterday.

I stated that she was not hit in the head. I asked if it
could be the Revolution and was informed that it could not
be. I told my vet that was the only thing that Sage had
been exposed to.

He did a CBC and her platelets were 87 and WBC count was
27,000. her Hct was 37. He treated her for infection and
rat poisoning and sent us home.

Within 3 hours she was falling over. I rushed her back
to the Vet and he kept her until 5pm that afternoon. I
brought her home after they said she was doing better.

At 6pm she was again falling over and I called my Vet back
and was informed to bring her back the next day. By 11pm,
she was bleeding from her nose and had vomited with streaks
of bright red blood. My husband and I drove her to an ER
clinic in Savannah, GA and was told that it was either a tick
born disease or rat poisoning or a blow to the head.

I again asked if could be the Revolution and was informed no.

They kept her and treated her as my vet. When I called at
6am, I was informed that she was having seizures but she was
otherwise stable. I was worried about a subdural hematoma
and talked with my Vet.

He suggested I take Sage to Charleston, SC to see a Specialist.
She arrived there at 4:30pm. When I gave her history, I again
asked if it could be the Revolution and was informed no. Later
that night Sage continued to have seizures and she bled into the
orbits of her eyes, but they said their was still hope.

At 6:45am they called and said Sage had arrested and
was on a ventilator. We asked that they let her go.
This has been devastating to my family.

We loved that dog. She was a family member. At 10am, the
clinic called and asked for an autopsy. They informed me
that another dog had died last month there, with symptoms
the same as Sage. The dog was an inside dog and the only
thing different was that the owner had started Revolution.

The dog died of low platelets and intracrannial
hemorrhage just like Sage.

The vet in Charleston called the Revolution people and
they are paying for Sages autopsy. They also paid for
the other dogs autopsy. That autopsy showed low platelets
and intracrannial hemorrhage from a toxin. (? Revolution
was the only toxin the owners had given).

I will not know the results of the autopsy for a month,
but I believe it was the Revolution. If 2 dogs have died
in the Savannah-Charleston area in the last month, how
many nation wide.

Please spread the word for owners to be careful about
using this drug on their dogs. No dog should suffer
like my Sage suffered.

Thanks for Listening,
Terri Eddy
Rincon, GA

* A friend used Advantage on his dog who got sick from it.
He stopped using it and the dog recovered.

Reply Posted: on 2005-10-19

I have been going thru the same kind of problem with my Yorkie.
He is also on the Advantage flea protection. I am beginning to
wonder if this is a reaction to that medication.

If anyone else has this type of problem I would like to know.
I have been feeding him a hypo-allergenic type of dog food
with venison and potato as the main ingredients and just got
a capsul from my vet to put on the food for dry skin.

Any help or suggestions would be appreciated.


Reply Posted: on 2005-10-19

that is interesting that you are wondering if it has anything
to do with the advantage. the last time i bought advantage, i
purchased the one for dogs 20-50 pounds. i know it is the same
formula but i always wondered if it was too much for their little
bodies since they only weigh about 20-25 pounds. it was after that
when i noticed the dogs itching excessively.

Flea Control - Cats

Just a little warning for all you cat owners out there. I work
at a veterinary clinic and have done so for the past 15 years.

We had a cat come in last week that had a severe reaction to
Advantage-Multi being applied wrong by the owner. It is very
important to apply the medication at the base of the skull.

Not between the shoulder blades like other flea control products
like Revolution. Because the owners applied the Advantage at a
lower point the cat was able to turn around and lick the area and
Advantage Multi is not meant to be orally consumed.

The cat presented to the clinic with the following clinical signs:
fever, tachycardia, unable to walk and vomiting. We placed the cat
on IV fluids, started some medications and general nursing care and
the cat made a full recovery but if the owners had not noticed what
was happening with their pet they may have lost her.

Program - side effects?

Q: I have a 12 year old (18 lbs. Schnauzer) and a 3 year old (75 lbs.
collie) - The collie is presently on heartworm medication and
hypothyroid medication (2 pills daily - .05mm each)- the collie is
prone to seizures approximately every 8-9 weeks, we believe from the
hypothyroidism.

Will putting the collie on The Program flea control pill monthly
cause any reaction or side effects with the other medications the
dog is on? Would it be safe?

And the 12 year old is on no medications but on a special diet due
to fatty stones just surgically removed.

I want my animals safe and I don't like giving them medications
unless absolutely necessary. Frontline flea control was expensive
and did not work for my animals last flea season. Topical treatments
are just not enough and I am suspicious that some of the flea bombs
and dips that I have used in the past may have been toxic enough to
have caused these seizures in my collie.

The seizures have only been noticable since January of this year.

Thank you for your time.

Please respond. RJ in Pennsylvania

A: RJ - There is no evidence that I am aware of that Program (Rx)
will induce or facilitate seizures. It should be safe to use in
this situation and does not interact with the medications listed.

It is always hard to figure out what is causing seizures and many
times it is impossible to do so.

That leaves a lot of room for guessing at causes. It is probably
unlikely that previous insecticide use is the cause of the seizures
but it is probably possible. Hypothyroidism has been implicated
as a cause of seizures but it is probably not a common cause, either.

Supplementation of thyroid hormone should reduce the incidence
of seizures if hypothyroidism is the underlying cause.

Advantage - skin reaction possible

Q: We have a 7 month old golden who has dermatitis on the back of
the neck. The area affected is about 6" diameter. We are treating
with Cephalexin antibiotic and Gentocin topical spray.

My question regards the source of the infection. This location
matches the position where we apply Advantage flea control
(Imadacloprid).

I have been unable to find information regarding side affects of
this flea control. Can it act as a skin irritant that would lead
to infection? Would you discontinue this flea control?

A: Tom- I have seen some anecdotal reports of reactions to Advantage
(Rx) at the site it is put on. While this is a relatively minor problem
as reactions to medications go there is still no reason to use it if it

causes problems.

It is possible to use Frontline (Rx) or Program (Rx) as alternatives
for flea control. I would not give up on flea control entirely over
a reaction to one medication.

Mike Richards, DVM


The topical version (vs. the spray version) of Frontline (Rx) has
been more successful on long haired breeds such as collies, for us.
If Program does not control the fleas you might consider trying this -
or using both Program and Frontline or Advantage (Rx).

I hope that the seizures do diminish as time goes on.

Mike Richards, DVM

Gave her a dose of Revolution, hoping to prevent mange, and she went
into a shaking fit and wouldn't get up for hours. (Anyone want to buy
some Revolution cheap? I have 5 vials left.).


2 months ago, I ran out of the Revolution, and had a few extra
Advantage vials left over that I hadn't used yet, the date was
still good, and since a full month had passed, I saw no reason
why I couldn't apply the Advantage to the sheepies.

Annabelle had no reaction, but Jack lost a patch of hair the size
of a 3 inch circle in diameter, and the area turned red and raw.
I assume it was a reaction to the Advantage, it healed quickly
and the hair has grown back. I won't try that again though.

Rolling Eyes
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