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1 14th October 10:18
mark k
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Posts: 1
Default Future Iraqi leader spurns US (id)


http://www.news.scotsman.com/international.cfm?id=811362003

Sun 27 Jul 2003

Future Iraqi leader spurns US

Ian Mather


AMERICA'S favourite to become the leader of a new democratic Iraq
has moved to distance himself from the US following the deaths of
Saddam Hussein's two sons last week.

In an interview with Scotland on Sunday, Dr Adnan Pachachi, acting
head of the US-backed Iraqi Governing Council, even indicated that
the Iraqi people might take up arms against the Americans were it
not for the fact that they were 'tired' of war.

Only two weeks after the council came into existence at the behest
of the US, Pachachi - in London on his way to Baghdad after
addressing the United Nations in New York - issued a stream of
criticisms of the United States' role in Iraq.

Speaking about the deaths of Uday and Qusay Hussein during a fierce
gunbattle with American troops in Mosul, he said: "The previous
regime was based on a family organisation surrounding Saddam. So
killing the two sons means that the neck has been cut. But we would
have preferred it if they had been captured. Killing is not our
preferred option."

The council wanted to set up its own tribunal to try members and
supporters of the former regime, he said.

Pachachi, the favourite candidate of the US State Department, is
already thinking ahead to a future election, which he hopes to win
and go on to become prime minister.

'Iraqis are tired after three wars and don't want to start another'

He knows that his close identification with the Americans is likely
to be the kiss of death among Iraqi voters.

Unlike the Americans and the British, who refer to their military
presence in Iraq as the 'Coalition Authority', Pachachi talks about
the occupation of his native country.

One of the first acts of the council was to declare April 9, the
anniversary of the day that Saddam's statue was toppled, a national
holiday. But Pachachi said he already regretted this "possibly hasty
decision".

He added: "The occupation of Iraq started on March 20 when the
coalition forces crossed the border, not on April 9. So it's not a
national holiday for the occupation, it's a national holiday for the
fall of the regime.

"In any case, there needs to be a law before the new national day
becomes official and such a law has not been enacted yet."

Mystery surrounds the status of his principal rival for the
leadership of the council, Ahmed Chalabi, head of the Iraqi National
Congress, who is said to have support from the US Pentagon.

The two men sat side by side at a press conference in New York and
declared that they were "colleagues".

But it was Pachachi who addressed the Security Council and then met
Prime MinisterTony Blair in London. Chalabi also failed to appear
with the Iraqi delegation in London.

All the Governing Council members were approved by Paul Bremer, the
US civilian administrator for Iraq, and all the council's decisions
must ultimately be approved by him.

Critics complain that the council is drawn largely from groups which
were previously based outside Iraq.

Pachachi, aged 80, a former foreign minister in a pre-Saddam
government, has lived in Abu Dhabi for 30 years, where he is an
adviser to the government.

But he is eager to explain: "This is a council of Iraqis chosen by
Iraqis after very extensive consultations.

"It was not appointed by the foreign authority. Most of the council
members are sacrificing a life of peace and comfort to go to Iraq,
which is in a lawless state. We are far more legitimate than some of
the regimes that the Iraqis have supported in the past."

To escape from the electoral embarrassment of appearing to be too
close to the Americans, Pachachi and the council are desperate to
"internationalise" the presence of foreign troops in Iraq and reduce
the American profile.

"Right from the very beginning I wanted the UN to have a central
role," Pachachi said.

"I said immediately after the collapse of the regime that the
Secretary General (Kofi Annan) should appoint a special
representative to oversee the whole process. Unfortunately this did
not happen and we have to deal with a situation where a huge US army
is in Iraq, and also the British.

"One way to deal with this would be not to co-operate, but the Iraqi
people are tired after three wars and don't want to start another
one."

He said there was the possibility of another UN resolution on
increasing its involvement and he hoped this would happen as soon as
possible.

"Even the US is coming round to the idea of giving the UN a greater
role. But this will take a long time, and it could give the
opportunity for some states to complicate the situation."

The immediate tasks of the Governing Council were to restore law and
order, public services, employment and economic stability by
introducing a new Iraqi currency, he said.

"We think that the best way is to increase the number of police and
give them training. Unfortunately, the police were perceived by the
Iraqi people as agents of the previous regime and were extremely
corrupt."

He condemned the violence against American and British troops, which
last week cost the lives of another 14 American soldiers, the
biggest death toll in one week since the end of the fighting.

"These are sporadic acts of violence against the Americans and also
against other Iraqis," he said.

"They think that by continuing they are going to force the Americans
to get out of Iraq, but they are mistaken.

"They are also delaying the recovery of Iraq. I would like to ask
these people: 'What do you hope to achieve?'"

Although Bremer wields ultimate power, the Governing Council does
represent a first step towards representative government and is the
broadest-based government Iraq has ever had.

It contains representatives from Iraq's diverse religious and ethnic
groupings and officially has a Shia Muslim majority, a marked shift
for a country traditionally led by the minority Sunnis.

The Shias are showing an increasing desire to see the departure of
the Americans, a sentiment Pachachi, a Sunni, clearly shares.

"If the US still has a large army in Iraq in 2004, it will create
problems for the re-election of President Bush," he warned.

BLUEPRINT FOR DEMOCRACY

THE Iraqi Governing Council was established two weeks ago today and
held its first meeting amid tight security in the former Ministry
for Military Industry building in Baghdad.

One of its main duties will be to help draw up a new constitution
paving the way for free elections.

It consists of 25 members, of whom 13 are Shia Muslims, five Sunni
Muslims, five Kurds, one Christian and one Turkmen.

Among those on the panel, in addition to acting head Adnan Pachachi,
are Ahmed Chalabi (right), leader of the Iraqi National Congress;
Abdel-Aziz al-Hakim, a leader of the Supreme Council for the Islamic
Revolution; and Massoud Barzani and Jalal Talabani, leaders of the
two main Kurdish groups.

The Governing Council will appoint a commission, which will then
draw up the broad outlines of a constitution to be submitted to a
constitutional conference for final approval.

Full-scale elections are not likely to be held for at least one and
a half years. At best, it will take two months to choose a
constitutional commission and a further eight months to write and
approve the constitution.

There is no electoral law, no population census and no judicial
system to deal with any election problems so the commission will be
chosen through a consultation process.

It is thought it will take a minimum of a further two months to
organise and hold the elections, which could be overseen by the UN.

At the very least the intention is that it will provide an
international presence to make sure they are free and fair.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
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2 14th October 10:19
mark k
External User
 
Posts: 1
Default Future Iraqi leader spurns US


<excerpts>

AMERICA'S favourite to become the leader of a new democratic Iraq
has moved to distance himself from the US following the deaths of
Saddam Hussein's two sons last week.

In an interview with Scotland on Sunday, Dr Adnan Pachachi, acting
head of the US-backed Iraqi Governing Council, ...

Only two weeks after the council came into existence at the behest
of the US, Pachachi - in London on his way to Baghdad after
addressing the United Nations in New York - issued a stream of
criticisms of the United States' role in Iraq.

Pachachi, the favourite candidate of the US State Department, is
already thinking ahead to a future election, which he hopes to win
and go on to become prime minister.

He knows that his close identification with the Americans is likely
to be the kiss of death among Iraqi voters.

Unlike the Americans and the British, who refer to their military
presence in Iraq as the 'Coalition Authority', Pachachi talks about
the occupation of his native country.

One of the first acts of the council was to declare April 9, the
anniversary of the day that Saddam's statue was toppled, a national
holiday. But Pachachi said he already regretted this "possibly hasty
decision".

He added: "The occupation of Iraq started on March 20 when the
coalition forces crossed the border, not on April 9. So it's not a
national holiday for the occupation, it's a national holiday for the
fall of the regime.

"In any case, there needs to be a law before the new national day
becomes official and such a law has not been enacted yet."

Mystery surrounds the status of his principal rival for the
leadership of the council, Ahmed Chalabi, head of the Iraqi National
Congress, who is said to have support from the US Pentagon.

All the Governing Council members were approved by Paul Bremer, the
US civilian administrator for Iraq, and all the council's decisions
must ultimately be approved by him.

Critics complain that the council is drawn largely from groups which
were previously based outside Iraq.

"Right from the very beginning I wanted the UN to have a central
role," Pachachi said.

"I said immediately after the collapse of the regime that the
Secretary General (Kofi Annan) should appoint a special
representative to oversee the whole process. Unfortunately this did
not happen and we have to deal with a situation where a huge US army
is in Iraq, and also the British.

"One way to deal with this would be not to co-operate, but the Iraqi
people are tired after three wars and don't want to start another
one."

He said there was the possibility of another UN resolution on
increasing its involvement and he hoped this would happen as soon as
possible.


"We think that the best way is to increase the number of police and
give them training. Unfortunately, the police were perceived by the
Iraqi people as agents of the previous regime and were extremely
corrupt."

"If the US still has a large army in Iraq in 2004, it will create
problems for the re-election of President Bush," he warned.
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