Mombu the Reptiles Forum sponsored links

Go Back   Mombu the Reptiles Forum > Reptiles > New leopard gecko help, please (gecko)
User Name
Password
REGISTER NOW! Mark Forums Read

sponsored links


Reply
 
1 27th April 20:43
leopard geckos pet
External User
 
Posts: 1
Default New leopard gecko help, please (gecko)


We just bought a Leopard Gecko last weekend for my son. We were
advised by several that s/he would be the best first reptile for us.
Got it at PetCo and advise on care from them as well, but I have more
questions and am finding conflicting information on-line. I'd really
appreciate any help. Our gecko is about 5" from nose to tip of tail.

What should we have in the bottom of the tank? Four of the PetCo
people that we talked with while trying to determine whether or not we
should get this pet advised the extremely fine sand so that's what we
have. Now, I'm reading that sand may cause juvenilles to impact. Do I
need to worry and switch it out?

How many baby crickets each day should it eat? Will it over-fill its
belly? It has quite an appetite and is eating at least 10 baby
crickets each day. It also is pooping each day. The PetCo staff
advised me not to give mealworms to such a young one since mealworms
have a harder exoskeleton than crickets have. What products or fruits/
veggies are best for gut-loading the crickets?

I also bought wax worms for it. I was told only one or two per week.
So far it hasn't eaten any.

Can we handle the baby too much? I've been holding it about 20 minutes
each day. I think that it is getting used to me. It likes to crawl up
my arms and sit on my neck. My children's excitement still scares it
so the kid's are learning to be calmer around it.

It's tank is about 30" wide x 14" deep x 18" high. We have the heat
lamp and undertank heat pad on one end and water and food dish on the
other. Tank is not near a window. Sand is about 1" to 1-1/2" deep. I'm
concerned that the tank may be too cold or vary too much in
temperature over the course of the day. Warm end reads 88-100 degrees
in direct line with the heat lamp, cool end reads 72-74 degrees. I've
touched the hiding rock and it's warm, but not that warm. Our house
has at least a 10 degree change throughout the day. I don't want to
accidentally have the tank too hot. Any suggestions on how to better
regulate the temperature?

We were told to mist the gecko everyday to help with shedding. I've
also read that their hiding spot should have materials that rub
against the skin to help with shedding. We currently don't have
anything and the gecko can easily move through the hole to the hiding
spot without rubbing. It likes to climb in the water dish to drink so
I've only misted it once. How often do they shed?

Last night I noticed that it looked like it had a white-ish tint to
the black stripes. I don't know if it's shedding, normal or sick. This
morning its color looks fine, but its moving slow. I don't know if
that's normal for the morning. I have observed that dusk is when it
likes to hunt and is most active. Do I need to worry?

Is there anything else I need to know or watch?
  Reply With Quote


  sponsored links


2 28th April 03:00
chris mcmartin
External User
 
Posts: 1
Default New leopard gecko help, please (kingsnake coleonyx gecko)


It wouldn't hurt to switch it. It might not make a difference, but I'd say
it's better to err on the side of caution.


How big are the crickets? "Baby" could mean pinhead, 1/8 inch, etc. You
will be better off ordering your crickets in bulk from a place like Fluker
Farms (that's where I get mine). You'll find you will pay about 1/10 the
price you pay at PetCo (but you'll have to have a large Rubbermaid tub or
similar to keep them in).

There are all sorts of gut-loading products available, probably even at
PetCo. For the most part, it sounds like you've been getting decent advice
from your local PetCo staff (which is refreshing--usually they have no idea
what they're talking about!).

I don't think that's too much.

10 degrees of change is nothing. Leopard geckos come from arid habitat,
which due to the lower humidity in such regions causes much larger
temperature swings than your house experiences. I would, however, suggest
having a hiding spot on both the warm side and the cool side.


"It depends!" I don't keep leopard geckos, but I have an American banded
gecko (_Coleonyx variegatus_) which is closely related, and it sheds about
every other month (that I notice--they tend to eat their sheds).


Everything sounds pretty good so far--maybe just change the substrate to
something the lizard won't inadvertently ingest.


Go to forums.kingsnake.com and visit the Leopard Gecko forum if you haven't
already.

Chris

--
Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com
  Reply With Quote
3 28th May 20:43
adriennewm
External User
 
Posts: 1
Default New leopard gecko help, please


Leopard geckos do need UV light to avoid calcium deficiency. I'd
recommend a UV light bulb from the pet store... direct sunlight only
works if it is not filtered through glass.

I usually buy whatever "gut load" the store has, and supplement with
carrots, and sliced raw potato (supposedly a good source of water).
Most other veggie leftovers from your dinner would work too.

A small rock from outside would be sufficient for him to rub against
to aid in shedding. I usually scrub them really well to avoid
introducing any mites, I also put any wood I want to decorate my cages
with in the oven for a bit to kill any bugs in it.

If you decide to use sand make sure it is calcium sand (more
digestible, but can still cause impaction). Paper towels make a fine
bedding and are super easy to clean. Don't use cedar bark as its oils
can cause respiratory issues. Consistent high humidity can also cause
respiratory issues so don't keep it too moist.


I wouldn't worry about handling too much unless he stops eating (often
a sign of stress).

Hope this helps.
  Reply With Quote
4 28th May 20:43
erinmz
External User
 
Posts: 1
Default New leopard gecko help, please (gecko)


~ A lot of people say that you should not use sand, there is a risk
of impaction, but All 5 of mine were raised from tiny (around 3")
babies on sand with absolutely no problems. the best way to avoid
them ingesting sand is to put food in some sort of dish,

~ I feed mainly mealworms and superworms the supers have a softer
exoskeleton but they may be too large for your gecko still, crickets
are great but they are kind of a pain to maintain in large quantities,
in addition to gutloading you should also take out any dead crix every
day. and make sure they are in a well vetilated area. I also reccomend
lining your cricket container with papertowel or something similar, so
you can easily get rid of the crix excrement. leaving a piece of
cardboard eggcrate or a TP roll will give them a place to hide and
also make it easier to pick them up b/c they will cling to it when you
pick it up.


What products or fruits/


~ Store bought gutload is fine, I have heard rumors about Fluker's
carrying some kinds of disease or something but I have used it since I
have had my lizards, (3+ years) and never had a problem.


~ They might not see them or they might not be used to them as a
food, since they probably were not fed them at petco. make sure they
are wiggling or try hand feeding them if you really want them to eat them.


~ The more you handle it the more comfortable it will get with you
handling you. I have had one bite once in 3 years, and it was not
even at one of the kids, a guest in our house threw a bottle cap at
the person holding him and he accidentally hit the gecko, he got
scared and bit her finger. That is the only time any of the 5 has bit someone.


~ Unless it's really cold in your house, I would not reccomend using
the undertank heating pad, they can be known to malfunction and
overheat. using the same wattage heating bulb consistantly 24hrs a day
should be plenty of heat, as long as you maintain a constant
temperature and the gecko isn't hiding on the coldest or hottest spot
all the time you should be OK.


~ They shed when they are growing, so as juvies they will shed a lot
and as they get older less and less, it is not uncommon for them to
shed every week or so as babies.

~ Probably shedding, the layer of skin loosens and looks whitish
before it comes off. Don't be surprised if you never see the skin,
they will eat it after they shed.

It sounds like you got very good advice from petco, but I would
reccommend finding a pet shop that specializes in exotics in your
area, they usually have alot of great advice and there will be lots of
neat products that you won't find at chain stores. also if you are
intersted in seeing more types and designs of leopard geckos along
with care info and lots of other good stuff check out Ron Tremper's
site (he is the premier breeder of "designer" leopard geckos)
http://www.leopardgecko.com/

hope you find this helpful.
  Reply With Quote
5 28th May 20:43
jules
External User
 
Posts: 1
Default New leopard gecko help, please


Who says you need UV for nocturnal geckos?
  Reply With Quote
6 28th May 21:24
chris mcmartin
External User
 
Posts: 1
Default New leopard gecko help, please


How does a nocturnal reptile get its UV in the wild?

--
Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com
  Reply With Quote
7 28th May 21:24
jules
External User
 
Posts: 1
Default New leopard gecko help, please


puts on sunglasses and lays on the sunbed.....
  Reply With Quote
8 27th April 20:33
michelle
Miembro
Mombu User
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: United States
Posts: 2
michelle is on a distinguished road
Default Re: New leopard gecko help, please (gecko)


I currently have 2 leopard geckos at my home. My reccomendations would be that you should definitly not use sand for a substrate because it killed my first gecko within a month from sand impaction. I bought a roll of astro turf and home depot and cut it to fit my cage. If you cut 2 pieces you can take one out and clean it and replace it with the other right away.
michelle is offline   Reply With Quote
9 27th April 20:37
michelle
Miembro
Mombu User
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: United States
Posts: 2
michelle is on a distinguished road
Default Re: New leopard gecko help, please (gecko)


My geckos are pretty tolerant to temperature change but you can buy two different wattages of bulbs to change in the winter/summer. Misting your gecko when they shed is a good idea just so they dont have any skin that stays on. As far as handling goes it is fine as long as the gecko is comfortable, you don't want to stress it out or it might drop its tail.
michelle is offline   Reply With Quote
10 2nd September 00:55
leopard geckos pet
External User
 
Posts: 1
Default New leopard gecko help, please (gecko)


We just bought a Leopard Gecko last weekend for my son. We were
advised by several that s/he would be the best first reptile for us.
Got it at PetCo and advise on care from them as well, but I have more
questions and am finding conflicting information on-line. I'd really
appreciate any help. Our gecko is about 5" from nose to tip of tail.

What should we have in the bottom of the tank? Four of the PetCo
people that we talked with while trying to determine whether or not we
should get this pet advised the extremely fine sand so that's what we
have. Now, I'm reading that sand may cause juvenilles to impact. Do I
need to worry and switch it out?

How many baby crickets each day should it eat? Will it over-fill its
belly? It has quite an appetite and is eating at least 10 baby
crickets each day. It also is pooping each day. The PetCo staff
advised me not to give mealworms to such a young one since mealworms
have a harder exoskeleton than crickets have. What products or fruits/
veggies are best for gut-loading the crickets?

I also bought wax worms for it. I was told only one or two per week.
So far it hasn't eaten any.

Can we handle the baby too much? I've been holding it about 20 minutes
each day. I think that it is getting used to me. It likes to crawl up
my arms and sit on my neck. My children's excitement still scares it
so the kid's are learning to be calmer around it.

It's tank is about 30" wide x 14" deep x 18" high. We have the heat
lamp and undertank heat pad on one end and water and food dish on the
other. Tank is not near a window. Sand is about 1" to 1-1/2" deep. I'm
concerned that the tank may be too cold or vary too much in
temperature over the course of the day. Warm end reads 88-100 degrees
in direct line with the heat lamp, cool end reads 72-74 degrees. I've
touched the hiding rock and it's warm, but not that warm. Our house
has at least a 10 degree change throughout the day. I don't want to
accidentally have the tank too hot. Any suggestions on how to better
regulate the temperature?

We were told to mist the gecko everyday to help with shedding. I've
also read that their hiding spot should have materials that rub
against the skin to help with shedding. We currently don't have
anything and the gecko can easily move through the hole to the hiding
spot without rubbing. It likes to climb in the water dish to drink so
I've only misted it once. How often do they shed?

Last night I noticed that it looked like it had a white-ish tint to
the black stripes. I don't know if it's shedding, normal or sick. This
morning its color looks fine, but its moving slow. I don't know if
that's normal for the morning. I have observed that dusk is when it
likes to hunt and is most active. Do I need to worry?

Is there anything else I need to know or watch?
  Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools
Display Modes




Copyright 2006 SmartyDevil.com - Dies Mies Jeschet Boenedoesef Douvema Enitemaus -
666